Ahuatanga Ako

The student is intellectually stimulated within an environment conducive to learning.

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

The student is actively engaged in learning

Active engagement promotes student achievement and success.

  • Students are happy and involved.
  • Students are calm and settled.
  • Students appear quiet and attentive.
  • Students appear eager to learn.
  • Students listen intently and understand kaupapa.
  • Students listen to kaumātua.
  • Students enjoy different experiences.
  • Students use all senses when learning
  • Students question, discuss, analyse, synthesise, test, hypothesise.
  • Students create and explore.
  • Students display curiosity.Students are thinkers, planners and doers.
  • Students are motivated and willing to learn new things.
  • Students are passionate about learning.
  • Students appear focused and on task.
  • Students are aware of those around them.
  • Students encourage others.
  • Students share and cooperate with others in groups.
  • Students honour kaumātua as repositories of knowledge.
  • Students willingly attend school
  • Students appreciate whānau involvement in the learning programme.
  • Students contribute to decision making.
  • Students show an aptitude for learning.
  • Students use their creativity to support them with new learning.
  • Students use their intuition when learning.
  • Whānau promote happiness and calm.
  • They promote positive interactions and relationships in the learning environment.
  • They provide stimulating learning experiences that are of interest to students.
  • They combine different teaching modes to enhance learning.
  • They provide activities and resources to enhance learning.
  • They encourage, prompt and praise discussion and questioning.
  • They guide and support students in analysing, synthesising, testing and hypothesising.
  • They provide opportunities for students to create and explore.
  • They encourage curiosity.
  • They create opportunities for students to demonstrate thinking, planning and action.
  • They use a range of strategies to motivate all students.
  • Whānau model passion for teaching and learning.
  • They involve a wide range of people including kaumātua in the learning programme.
  • They provide new learning experiences.
  • They are actively involved in the learning programme.
  • They encourage active participation in decision making.
 

Research conducted by Cooper et al (2004) found that most children attending kōhanga reo and kura kaupapa were positive about their experiences and enjoyed learning te reo Māori.

Bishop et al (2001) found that effective teachers used a variety of techniques to foster oral language learning including movement, singing, listening, and hearing.

Hemara in Salter (2003) advocates placing children and adults at the centre of the learning process, while recognising the individual’s special abilities.

The individual child’s self-confidence… attitudes to particular classroom contexts and/or particular activities are important in the child’s learning. (Cooper et al, 2004)

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

Students’ individual learning needs are catered for.

Individual students have different interests and learn at different rates and in different ways. Teachers need to consider these.

  • Students talk about their abilities and successes.
  • Students discuss their talents and their potential.
  • Students define their learning needs.
  • Students celebrate their differences.
  • Students talk about their learning interests.
  • Students discuss learning objectives
  • Students link known learning to new learning.
  • Students talk about and set learning goals.
  • Students explain their learning objectives.
  • Students talk about the purpose of learning.
  • Students are happy with their learning progress.
  • Students discuss learning relevance.
  • Students demonstrate a keen interest in learning.
  • Students use a range of teaching and learning resources.
  • Students use classroom routines daily.
  • Students work independently.
  • Students work in groups.
  • Students actively participate in a range of activities.
  • Students know their roles and responsibilities in the learning environment.
  • Students identify and follow their defined learning path.
  • Students acknowledge their creative learning needs.
  • Whānau use formal and informal assessment alongside purposeful observation to determine the learning needs of students.
  • They investigate the learning interests of students.
  • They use their knowledge of their students to support teaching and learning decisions.
  • They use a range of relevant and regular assessment strategies.
  • They share the learning abilities and needs.
  • They encourage students to celebrate their differences.
  • Whānau design and provide access to relevant programme content.
  • They plan the programme of learning to reflect the curriculum and respond to the individual needs of students.
  • They discuss and share the learning objectives with students.
  • They create links between known and new learning.
  • They encourage and support students to set learning goals.
  • They discuss learning objectives with students.
  • They provide appropriate teaching and learning resources.
  • Whānau establish clear classroom management routines.
  • They provide opportunities for students to work independently and in groups.
  • They encourage active involvement in a range of activities.
  • They support students to understand the part they play in their learning.
  • They support and guide students in defining their learning path.
 

Evidence shows that students respond to teachers who treat them as individuals. Students felt validated by teachers who took an active interest in students’ lives and wellbeing. (Abernathy and Gorinski, 2003)

Bishop et al (2001) found that effective teachers used mixed strategies to keep children interested and focused, incorporating activities and resources into the programmes that required students to use a range of senses in abstract and concrete situations.

           

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

The student is a confident learner.

Success in learning comes from the confidence to be an active participant, accept and fulfil educational challenges and advance as a risk taker.

  • Students use their imagination throughout their learning.
  • Students honour kaumātua and use their example as role models.
  • Students participate in a range of experiences in different learning environments.
  • Students demonstrate free, open and enquiring minds.
  • Students actively seek knowledge.
  • Students experience success with learning.
  • Students display personal integrity.
  • Students make choices about their learning experiences.
  • Students display their personal preferences and strengths.
  • Students actively use problem-solving skills.
  • Students initiate their learning experiences.
  • Students use their creative talent.
  • Students use their natural talents to advance their own learning.
  • Students display initiative
  • Students confidently take risks in learning.
  • Whānau encourage students to use their imagination throughout learning.
  • They include kaumātua in the learning programme.
  • They provide a range of challenging learning experiences.
  • They access the wider world to enhance the learning experience.
  • They provide a range of resources to support the learning experience.
  • They encourage independence in pursuit of knowledge.
  • They acknowledge and commend success.
  • They model professional and personal integrity.
  • They provide opportunities for students to use their problem solving skills.
  • They accept the diverse learning needs and preferences of students.
  • They praise those who show initiative in a range of situations.
  • They provide students with skills to support them with risk taking in learning.
  • They encourage risk taking in learning and affirm learning attempts.
 

Researchers found that effective teachers used positive feedback and praise to reinforce what the children had done or were doing resulting in on task behaviour and an effective independent learning environment. (Bishop et al 2001)

Effective teachers all used a range of traditional and contemporary approaches including culturally legitimate pedagogies such as peer tutoring, waiata, whakataukï, tauparapara, action songs, group learning, karakia, and whakapapa to engage students in learning. (Bishop, et al, 2001)