Ngā Iwi

The student is secure in the knowledge of ancestral links and the hopes and aspirations of whānau, hapū and iwi.

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

The student exhibits personal pride in their whānau, iwi and hapū.

Knowledge of whānau, iwi, hapū, and individual identity foster a strong sense of self and community.

  • Students explain their genealogy and acknowledge those of others.
  • Students explain their hapū and iwi connections and discuss the links with others.
  • Students explain the importance of Māori, whānau, iwi and hapū identity.
  • Students exhibit pride in their Māori, whānau, iwi and hapū identity.
  • Students demonstrate their understanding of iwi-specific tikanga and kawa through their actions.
  • Students discuss iwi differences and similarities.
  • Students discuss the aspirations of their whānau, hapū and iwi.
  • Students talk about and explore other societies.
  • Students discuss historical, cultural, political, social, religious and economic events and their link to Māori heritage.
  • Students attend a range of Māori, whānau, iwi and hapū events.
  • Students discuss tino rangatiratanga and consider the implications of it.
  • Students share their learning experiences with whānau.
  • Students work alongside their peers and other whānau.
  • Students appear happy in the whānau learning environment.
  • Students exhibit a caring and supportive manner toward whānau.
  • Students exhibit natural talent and are proud of their achievements.
  • Whānau acknowledge genealogy and guide all students to determine the links within whānau, hapū and iwi.
  • They provide opportunities for students to learn about their ancestral links.
  • They discuss the importance of Māori, whānau, iwi, hapū and individual identity.
  • They discuss and demonstrate iwi-specific tikanga and kawa.
  • They model pride in Māori, whānau, iwi, hapū and individual identity.
  • They introduce understanding of other iwi.
  • They promote discussions about whānau, hapū and iwi aspirations
  • They provide historical, cultural, political, social, religious and economic experiences that reflect links to Māori heritage.
  • They provide trips and events that enhance learning about iwi.
  • They prompt discussion about tino rangatiratanga.
  • Whānau are actively involved in school operations, administration and programme support.
  • They are actively involved in learning experiences.
  • They provide a supportive and caring environment.
 

Whānau are an integral element of Māori social structure and provide a potential mechanism for far reaching informal educational support. (Cunningham et al. 2005)

Constructive relationships between parents and children and with grandparents, siblings, uncles and aunts, cousins are important determinants of successful learning, and lay the foundations for positive relationships in later life. (Durie, 2006)

When Māori students are surrounded by their culture and language they are more likely to receive positive reinforcement of their self-identity. (Aspin, in Webber, 1996)

Research found that the use of pēpeha and karakia are used effectively as part of the ongoing learning process. (Cooper et al, 2004)

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

The student acknowledges the importance attached to different roles and responsibilities in Māoridom.

In Māoridom there is a range of significant roles and responsibilities.

  • Students understand their place in society.
  • Students define and accept the different roles and responsibilities of whānau, iwi and hapū.
  • Students explore and become familiar with kura roles and responsibilities.
  • Students actively pursue different roles and responsibilities in the kura.
  • Students understand the range of roles in the whānau.
  • Students make connections between roles and responsibilities and can explain the benefits of these.
  • Students carry out a range of different roles and understand the contributions that they make.
  • Students discuss the importance of clearly defined roles and responsibilities
  • Students discuss the status attached to different roles.
  • Students discuss the values, skills and knowledge required for different roles and responsibilities.
  • Students observe and experience different occasions where roles and responsibilities are clearly defined.
  • Students experience a range of supporting roles.
  • Students experience leadership opportunities.
  • Students demonstrate their tangata whenua role.
  • Students accept and take responsibility for delegated roles.
  • Students are creative in their approach to leadership roles and responsibilities.
  • Students show natural talent for leadership responsibilities.
  • Whānau explain the importance of society and prompt discussion about the part people play.
  • They provide opportunities for students to learn about the different roles and responsibilities in the whānau, iwi and hapū.
  • They model roles and responsibilities in the kura.
  • They provide opportunities for students to experience a range of roles and responsibilities.
  • They discuss whānau roles and responsibilities.
  • They discuss the connections and benefits of roles and responsibilities.
  • They provide opportunities for students to consider the status attached to different roles and responsibilities.
  • They prompt discussion about the values, skills and knowledge of those with different roles and responsibilities.
  • Whānau attend a range of occasions that demonstrate different roles.
  • They model different roles and responsibilities.
  • They provide leadership opportunities.
  • They encourage students to accept and take responsibility for delegated roles.
  • They praise students for their efforts.
 

“The cultural values, customs, and practices that organise around the whānau and ‘collective responsibility‘ are a necessary part of Māori survival and educational achievement.” (Pihama, Cram, Walker, 2002)

Indicator

Rationale

Observable behaviour

Whānau practices and beliefs

Research

The student demonstrates effective relationships with others.

Students that relate well to others in informal and formal situations in both Māori and non-Māori worlds will benefit their own learning and will contribute to the wider community well being.

  • Students define their place in their environment.
  • Students interact well with others in the kura, marae, the local and wider community.
  • Students interact positively as tangata whenua with manuhiri.
  • Students interact positively with whānau and kaumātua.
  • Students have experiences with the wider community and others.
  • Students discuss the differences between themselves and others.
  • Students discuss and are curious about traditional and contemporary societies.
  • Students develop an appreciation for learning about others.
  • Students develop a sense of inquiry as they learn about other societies.
  • Students demonstrate confidence when with other groups.
  • Students demonstrate positive relationships with other groups.
  • Students become aware of different values and beliefs.
  • Students compare the values and beliefs of others with their own.
  • Students accept differences and pursue positive relationships.
  • Students interact naturally in their environment.
  • Students relate to others in a unique fashion.
  • Students creatively pursue positive relationships.
  • Whānau provide opportunities for students to know their environment.
  • They model pride in the environment.
  • They provide opportunities to interact on the marae, in the kura, the local and wider community.
  • They model positive interactions as tangata whenua to manuhiri
  • They model positive interactions with whānau and kaumātua.
  • They provide opportunities for relationships to flourish.
  • Whānau prompt students to consider differences among people.
  • They provide experiences that demonstrate society's contemporary and traditional differences.
  • They provide learning opportunities that involve others.
  • They promote thinking about others.
  • They elicit discussion about relationships and how best to foster positive ones.
  • They provide opportunity to consider different values and beliefs.
  • They encourage acceptance of difference.
  • They model positive relationships.
 

Thoughtful understanding and positive attitudes, which demonstrate respect for the position of Māori parents as tangata whenua, enhance the self‑esteem of Māori children and provide a basis for future learning. (Ministry of Education report, 1998)

Whanaungatanga - building relationships - is a critical function that contributes to human potential and to successful engagement outside the whānau. (Durie, 2006)

Bevan-Brown (2003) advocates positive reinforcement that focuses on raising and affirming self-esteem and developing social skills including interacting cooperatively and positively with othe