Appendix Two: Evaluation framework and indicators

Context and Approach

Q1. What are the important aspects of the school and its community that have an impact on the need for, and provision of, guidance and counselling?

Q2. What is the school’s overall approach to providing guidance and counselling?

Indicators

  • There are clear delineations of roles and boundaries between behaviour management, counselling, academic guidance and pastoral care.
  • The school culture reflects a proactive, early intervention approach.
  • There is consensus across the school about services offered.
  • Guidance counsellors are included in significant student welfare decisions and planning.
  • There are clear partnerships with Māori / mana whenua around access to culturally responsive services / choice.
  • It is not a closed system – there is openness and appropriate communication with other relevant agencies, with a demonstration of real relationships over a period of time.
  • The school is known (by external reference points) for counselling / pastoral care strengths.
  • Students’ help-seeking behaviour is normalised, and attendance at counselling is seen as normal.
  • Leadership of the guidance team is clearly defined, with agreed protocols, good communication, and shared values.
  • Information from the guidance and counselling team informs annual and strategic planning.
  • School leadership understands counselling ethics.
  • There is a whole school ethos around ensuring that every student matters, is listened to, has people they can go to.
  • Guidance structures meet the identified needs of students.
  • The school prioritises the role of guidance and counselling and recognises possible conflicts of interest with a teaching role.
  • There is a specialist guidance counsellor with post-grad qualifications in counselling.
  • Guidance and counselling is seen as preventative rather than reactive.
  • There is sensitivity to different cultural groups.
  • Students participate fully in the life of the school – inclusive.

Implementation

Q3. How does the school implement its approach?

Indicators

  • Students and community accept that counselling is a healthy intervention.
  • There is a clear management structure regarding guidance activities.
  • There are high levels of self referral to guidance counsellors and referrals by deans, teachers etc. to counselling.
  • Guidance and counselling is guided by clear school-wide and specific policies and procedures.
  • There is effective public communication about guidance and counselling services, and clear access pathways.
  • There is community access to guidance and counselling services and there are responsive community relationships.
  • Guidance and counselling is inclusive of various ethnic communities and parents and there is GLTB support operating, and this is demonstrated by observable participation and positive feedback.
  • All involved have a shared understanding of risk management, protocols and referrals to appropriate agencies.
  • There are good referral pathways to mental health services, CYFs, Police, truancy, community agencies.
  • Every teacher knows what to do with information from students and how to support students.
  • Parents say:Their children know where to go if they have a problem.
  • They trust the services offered by the school, and accept the need for confidentiality except when there is serious risk of harm.
  • There are clear and effective organisational structures for guidance and counselling.
  • Guidance and counselling systems meet identified needs of students.
  • School management provides adequate staffing resources for guidance and counselling.
  • School management provides adequate physical resources for guidance and counselling.
  • There is appropriate record-keeping for guidance and counselling.
  • Guidance and counselling staff effectively assess student needs – individual crisis management (response).
  • Guidance counsellors, deans etc. are busy in their guidance and counselling roles.
  • There is effective public communication of guidance and counselling services and clear access pathways.

Professional practice

Q4. What does the school do to promote and maintain the ongoing professional practice and development of those providing guidance and counselling?

Indicators

  • Professional supervision is robust, well resourced, external (accessible).
  • Guidance counsellors are included in significant student welfare decisions and planning.
  • There is community access to services and responsive community relationships.
  • Guidance meetings, pastoral care and planning meetings around students are positive and constructive.
  • Guidance counsellors and others in similar roles have current and relevant job description.
  • School management provides adequate professional development resources for the guidance and counselling team, and to develop a school-wide shared understanding, including at induction of new staff.
  • The guidance and counselling team are able to network and meet with other professionals in a similar role.
  • The guidance and counselling team is qualified.
  • There are appropriate appointments and appraisal processes.
  • All staff understand and respect each other’s roles and collaborate.
  • All teachers understand the role of the guidance team and there are trusting relationships.
  • There is a shared understanding of guidance and counselling in the school.
  • Every teacher knows what to do with information from students and how to support students.
  • Intern guidance counsellors are utilised and monitored appropriately.

Relationships and Communications

Q5. How does the school manage its relationships both internally and externally for the benefit of the students?

Indicators

  • The guidance counsellor is seen as approachable and there are clear pathways for students to seek help.
  • The community has access to services and there are responsive community relationships.
  • The guidance and counselling system is not a closed system – there is openness and appropriate communication with other relevant agencies, demonstrated by real relationships over a period of time.
  • There are good referral pathways to mental health providers, CYFs, Police, truancy, and community agencies.

Self Review

Q6. What does the school know about the effectiveness and/or impact of its guidance and counselling?

Indicators

  • The school has low or improved rates of stand-downs and exclusions.
  • The school regularly self reviews at a school-wide level.
  • The guidance and counselling team regularly reviews the quality of other provision.
  • The school makes changes in response to self review.
  • The school has robust guidance and counselling data.
  • The data protects student confidentiality about their uptake of, and participation in, guidance and counselling.
  • The data includes ethnicity, gender, year level, presenting issues, referrer.
  • This data is shared with staff and board for feedback and transparency, but confidentiality is maintained.

Student perspective – consider across all questions

Indicators

  • Students know about the services guidance and counselling provided – part of induction process, and ongoing.
  • The guidance and counselling service has a high user-rate – it is well used.
  • There are high student self-referrals.
  • Every student believes:They have access to the support they need.
  • That all the teachers are on the same page.
  • That there are other students who will provide support.
  • That their safety is paramount (within and outside school).
  • Confidential surveys confirm the above and are done regularly.

Overall Judgement

Q7. How well does the school provide guidance and counselling to students?

  • Very well
  • Well
  • Somewhat well
  • Not at all well