Appendix 3: Evaluation indicators

Including students with high needs - indicator framework

Presence

Enrolment and

Induction

  • The school welcomes students with high needs
  • The school is prepared to make appropriate changes to support a student with high needs (i.e. has not suggested to parents that children would be better off elsewhere)The school’s induction process is organised and welcoming for students with high needs and their families
  • The induction programme works well at all times through the year

Identifying student needs and strengths

  • The school has high quality processes in place for identifying the educational needs of students with high needs
  • The school has sought and used the student’s point of view with regard to what supports their inclusion and learning (decision-making)
  • The school has used valid and reliable methods to identify the interests and strengths of students with high needs in order to fully support their learning and development
  • The school has processes in place for identifying the needs of students in relation to any physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, behavioural or intellectual impairments
  • School personnel understand that it is their role to adapt to the needs presented by a student – rather than ‘fit’ the student to their school

Participation and engagement

Links with families

  • The school respects and values the knowledge parents have of their child’s learning, development and achievement
  • Relationships are focused on building a constructive partnership between families and the school, and supporting the ongoing inclusion of a student with high needs
  • The school is proactive in creating positive links with families (ie regular home/school contact)
  • Feedback to families includes a celebration of success and is not (deficit) focused on negatives or a sense of ‘failure’
  • Parents are included in any IEP processes and provided with regular feedback about their child’s progress and how they might complement school-based learning at home

The coordination of services and support

  • The school has coordinated an appropriate range of services or personnel in support of any specialised needs presented by students with high needs, for example Special Education, RTLBs, therapists
  • The coordination and monitoring of specialist services and support for students with high needs is given high status in the school, e.g. it is overseen by an effective, senior member of staff (NB not all schools have a SENCO and some SENCO lack training)
  • The SENCO (or equivalent) provides support and guidance for teachers and teacher aides to include students with high needs
  • The SENCO (or equivalent) oversees the progress of students with high needs
  • Teachers share their knowledge of the needs, likes, interests and specialist support requirements of students as they progress through the school, from year to year (ie there is a formal process of planning for students as they progress from teacher to teacher)
  • Plans are in place to ensure that all students with high needs can attend school if a teacher-aide is absent

School-wide culture

  • The board of trustees and principal emphasise the importance of an inclusive culture through their comments, policies, processes, resourcing and planning
  • The principal provides ethical leadership for the school on the importance of meeting the diverse needs of all students, including students with high needs
  • There is a school-wide emphasis on meeting the needs of all students, including students with high needs
  • The board has invested in appropriate resources to support inclusion (this includes the board using special education funding and staffing (ORRS, Learning Support etc) to support students with high needs
  • The staff and students at the school are positive about the involvement of students with high needs at the school
  • Regular students have been provided with coaching, support and modelling to appropriately relate to students with high needs
  • Students with high needs are not seen in terms of their impairments, but are seen as students who are expected to achieve, contribute to school culture and have strengths worth nurturing
  • There is an absence of bullying (especially towards students with high needs)
  • There is evidence that the school has adapted its physical environment to meet the needs of current students with high needs
  • The success of students with high needs is celebrated
  • Teachers openly share with one another the success and challenges in their teaching of students with high needs (no blame approach)
  • The board has developed appropriate behaviour management plans for students with high needs

Relationships with peers

  • The relationships students with high needs have with their peers are supportive
  • Students with high needs have their social development supported as required
  • Students with high needs have friendships with regular students
  • Students with high needs are included in social events in and outside of the school (e.g. school socials, birthday parties)

Classroom teaching

  • Students with high needs learn alongside their peers in regular classes as much as possible
  • Learning programmes support the objectives identified in IEPs or other planning
  • Students with high needs have well-planned learning experiences, not just ‘busy work’
  • Teaching is planned and differentiated with the learning of all students in mind
  • Lessons encourage students with high needs to participate and interact
  • Students with high needs work cooperatively along with other students
  • There is evidence of student to student communication and teacher to student communication (and that the teacher aide is not the sole medium of information)
  • Teacher aides support teachers to include students with high needs
  • Classroom teaching underlines the importance of diversity

Extra-curricular involvement

  • Students with high needs take part in sporting and cultural activities alongside regular students at the school
  • Students with high needs take part in physical activity (where appropriate) and other learning activities outside the classroom

Learning supports

  • The school has resourced high quality physical and educational support for the range of needs demonstrated by students with high needs
  • The effectiveness of learning supports are monitored
  • Learning support is coordinated with IEPs, and well developed objectives for student learning and development

Professional development and support

  • Staff receive high quality professional development to understand and support the specific learning needs of particular students with high needs
  • Professional development and support is readily accessible
  • Professional development for teachers and teacher aides supports their ability to teach students with diverse needs (ie professional development for Autistic Spectrum Disorder has been available for the last few years)

Culturally responsive

  • The school has culturally responsive processes to identify and support the needs and aspirations of Māori and Pacific students with high needs and their whānau/families

Achievement

The achievement of students with high needs

  • There are high expectations for all students (Including students with high needs)
  • The achievements of students with high needs reflect deep and/or meaningful learning
  • Students with high needs are making progress in their IEPs and/or any particular academic, intellectual, behavioural, communication, social or physical goals agreed to be appropriate
  • Students with high needs succeed in a variety of contexts, academic, leadership, sporting and cultural

The benefits to mainstream students

  • Students without high needs demonstrate tolerance, warmth, understanding and friendship to students with high needs in their classrooms
  • Parents, whānau and the wider school appreciate the benefits for all students of their children working with students with high needs