What did ERO do?

What did ERO do?

In this evaluation, ERO wanted to learn about the experiences of Newly Graduated Teachers (NGTs) as they entered the workforce.

In Terms 2 and 3, 2016, ERO conducted semi-structured interviews with leaders in 109 early learning services, and 209 NGTs in these services. These teachers were also invited to complete an online survey. The survey was completed by 70 teachers across 36 services.

ERO also conducted semi-structured interviews with leaders and teachers in schools. ERO talked to leaders at 118 schools, and 379 NGTs at these schools. The survey was completed by 182 NGTs from 75 different schools.

Appendix 2 outlines ERO’s evaluation framework and approach to data gathering and synthesis. Further information about the services and schools in this evaluation is in Appendix 3.

ERO sought to answer the following evaluation questions:

  • How confident and prepared do newly graduated teachers in early learning services feel/think they were to use the early childhood curriculum Te Whāriki to:
    • design, implement and evaluate a curriculum that is responsive to the language, culture and identity of all of the children they are responsible for in their service, particularly those children at risk of poor educational outcomes
    • assess children’s progress and learning and use this information to develop teaching strategies to promote positive learning outcomes
    • work collaboratively with the parents and whānau of children to develop and maintain learner-centred relationships.
  • How confident and prepared do newly graduated teachers in schools feel/think they were in relation to:
    • having content and pedagogical knowledge appropriate to the learners and learning areas of their programme
    • having an understanding of the complex influences that personal, social and cultural factors may have on teachers and learners
    • using assessment tools to assess students’ progress and achievement
    • using assessment data to plan teaching strategies that respond to the identity, language and culture of all learners and accelerate the progress of students at risk of underachievement in their class
    • systematically and critically engaging with evidence to reflect on and refine their practice
    • working collaboratively with the parents and whānau of identified students to develop and maintain learner-centred relationships