Appendix 2: Sample and schools responding to survey

Sampling

An online survey about appointing a principal was provided for boards that had advertised for a principal between September 2011 and August 2012. A separate random sample of schools was selected for an online survey of principals about appointing staff.[33]

Responses were received from board chairpersons at 148 schools (68 percent response), and 199 principals (67 percent).

Table 2: Schools visited and schools responding to the surveys

 

Primary schools visited

Secondary schools visited

Number of trustees surveyed

Number of principals

surveyed

National percentage

 

N=173

N=27

148 responses

199 responses

N=2430

School type

   

%

%

%

Full primary

Contributing

Intermediate, middle school

Special

99

48

14

2

 

45

28

3

1

38

43

7

0

44

32

5

2

Composite (Years 1-15, Years 1-10)

Secondary (Years 7-15)

Secondary (Years 9-15, Years 11-15)

7

3

0

1

7

19

3

4

17

3

2

9

5

4

9

Location of school

         

Main urban

Secondary urban

Minor urban

Rural

80

13

18

62

19

1

5

2

51

5

15

30

51

9

12

28

53

7

12

29

Size of school

         

Very small

Small

Medium

Large

Very large

17

43

72

28

13

0

2

12

9

4

10

29

37

18

5

6

19

38

23

14

10

25

37

19

9

Decile grouping

         

Low decile (deciles 1-3)

Medium decile (deciles 4-7)

High decile (deciles 8-10)

40

83

50

6

10

11

28

39

33

24

44

32

31

40

29

Note: percentages do not always add to 100 because of rounding.

Differences between the responding schools and the national distribution of schools were tested using chi square tests. Differences that were statistically significant (P<0.05) are described below.

The primary school evaluation included seven composite schools, three Years 7 to 15 secondary schools, and two special schools. More of the primary schools included were full primary schools (Years 1 to 8) than nationally (61 percent compared with 54 percent), and fewer were contributing schools (Years 1 to 6) – 30 percent compared with 39 percent. The sample also included slightly fewer low decile and more medium decile schools than nationally. This is consistent with the exclusion of longitudinal reviews which occur more often in low decile schools.

The boards responding to the Board of Trustees’ Survey came from a similar range of schools to the national distribution.

The principals responding to the Principal’s Survey slightly under-represented full primary schools and small schools.

Note

Characteristics of schools tend to be linked. For example, most rural schools were small and secondary schools tend to be larger and in main urban areas.