Appendix 3: Judgements used for the evaluation

To what extent does this school promote and respond to student wellbeing?

 

4

The school’s promotion and response to wellbeing is extensive

The school’s culture, values and operations are well aligned with those of ERO’s Wellbeing Indicator Framework 1. The following features are evident:

  • The school’s approach to student wellbeing, including values, leadership, partnerships and inquiry processes contribute to students attaining the Desired Outcomesfor student wellbeing (figure 1), particularly those with high wellbeing needs.
  • There is a strong commitment and enactment of processes that promote and respond to student wellbeing, which align well with the Guiding Principlesfor student wellbeing 2 (or something equivalent) found in ERO’s Wellbeing Indicator Framework.
  • Inquiry processes inform the development of improved responses to wellbeing across the school, including processes for individual students with high wellbeing needs.
  • Learning, teaching and curriculum is focused on improving wellbeing. Wellbeing priorities are addressed through teaching and learning and this is integrated alongside (and complements) a school-wide focus on achievement.
  • The principles of the Health and Physical Education Curriculum are evident across the school’s teaching and learning.
  • Leaders are clear role models for promoting and responding to student wellbeing.
  • School partnerships with parents and whānau, as well as community health and social providers, greatly contribute to the students attaining the Desired Outcomes for student wellbeing.

3

The school’s promotion and response to wellbeing is good

The school’s promotion and response to student wellbeing reflects many of the aspects of the Wellbeing Indicator Framework, but there are areas where the school could improve. The following features are evident:

  • Although there are several positive aspects to the school’s approach to wellbeing, gains could be made by a more strategic focus, such as the school bringing its work together in terms of the Guiding Principles for student wellbeing (enhancing its collaboration and/or cohesion).
  • The school’s culture is focused on promoting student wellbeing, and it has good care systems and initiatives, but its curriculum does not yet have a strong focus on wellbeing.
  • There is some evidence that the school is contributing to many students attaining/working towards the Desired Outcomesfor student wellbeing.
  • The school has some information on student wellbeing, which it responds to, but inquiry and improvement for wellbeing is not as coordinated or robust enough to consistently and systematically improve the school’s promotion of and responsiveness to student wellbeing.
  • Some school partnerships make a contribution to student wellbeing, although there is potential for greater coordination between the school and health and social providers.

2

Some promotion and response to student wellbeing is evident

There are aspects where the school’s promotion and response to student wellbeing reflect the Wellbeing Indicator Framework, but there are several areas where the school could improve. The following features are evident:

  • The school has some good relationships, including those among many staff and students, but there some aspects of the school’s curriculum or care that do not yet support student wellbeing or engagement.
  • Most of the school’s approach to wellbeing is delegated to a minority of staff.
  • The school has some inquiry and improvement processes but does not consistently respond to the identified wellbeing priorities.
  • There are many other forms of data the school should use to expand the scope of its inquiry into wellbeing, including student voice and involving whānau to identify wellbeing priorities.

1

Promotion and response to student wellbeing is limited

There are a few aspects where the school is promoting and responding to student wellbeing, but there are significant limitations overall. The following features are evident:

  • The school has some staff who ‘care’, but overall, student wellbeing is not supported by significant elements of the culture, curriculum and systems of the school.
  • The school has not clearly identified wellbeing priorities and/or there are few strategies or initiatives for change.
  • Leadership for wellbeing lacks direction and commitment.
  • Lack of partnerships act as a barrier to promoting and responding to student wellbeing.
  • There is little to no engagement with inquiry and improvement processes connected to student wellbeing.