Useful wellbeing resources

This section includes information about resources your school might find useful in promoting and responding to wellbeing. It includes information about:

  • wellbeing in relation to the health and physical education learning area (from The New Zealand Curriculum)
  • hauora and Te Whare Tapa Wha
  • a 'circle of care' model adapted from Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth
  • sources of wellbeing-related data you could use in your evaluation and inquiry activities
  • online resources for schools.

Health and physical education learning area

The health and physical education learning area of The New Zealand Curriculum highlights the importance of student wellbeing. 1

In health and physical education, the focus is on the well-being of the students themselves, of other people, and of society through learning in health-related and movement contexts.

At the heart of this learning area are four underlying and interdependent concepts:

  • Hauora - a Maori philosophy of wellbeing that includes the dimensions taha wairua, taha hinengaro, taha tinana, and taha whanau, each one influencing and supporting the others.
  • Attitudes and values - a positive, responsible attitude on the part of students to their own wellbeing; respect, care, and concern for other people and the environment; and a sense of social justice.
  • The socio-ecological perspective - a way of viewing and understanding the interrelationships that exist between the individual, others and society.
  • Health promotion - a process that helps to develop and maintain supportive physical and emotional environments and that involves students in personal and collective action.

Hauora

Mason Durie describes four dimensions of hauora in the development of his widely used model of Maori health, Te Whare Tapa Wha. 2

Te Whare Tapa Wha is represented by the four walls of a wharenui, 3 or meeting house, where each wall symbolises the elements necessary to sustain hauora or health and wellbeing. These dimensions or elements are taha hinengaro, taha wairua, taha tinana, and taha whanau. Taha hinengaro focuses on mental health and emotions. taha wairua focuses on spiritual health. Taha tinana focuses on physical health and taha whanau focuses on the epicentre of one's wellbeing:whānau.

Te Whare Tapa Wha is represented by the four walls of a wharenui, or meeting house, where each wall symbolises the elements necessary to sustain hauora or health and wellbeing. These dimensions or elements are taha hinengaro, taha wairua, taha tinana, and taha whanau. Taha hinengaro focuses on mental health and emotions. taha wairua focuses on spiritual health. Taha tinana focuses on physical health and taha whanau focuses on the epicentre of one's wellbeing:whānau.

Circle of care

Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth suggests a 'circle of care' 4 approach that places the student at the centre surrounded by layers of care - of which a guidance and counselling team is only one layer. 
Figure 4 shows this idea, adapted for New Zealand schools. 5

Circle of care is a large cirlce which is made up of a centre circle and 4 rings. The centre is Student then going outward the first ring reads: Core team, Parents and whanau, Teachers. The second ring reads: In-school guidance and counselling team, Guidance counsellor, Form/whanau teachers, Gifted and talented, Senior leadership team, SENCO, Learning support, Deans and Principal. The third ring reads Education supports team, Therapists, School based health services, Social worker, Youth worker, RTLB, Psychologist. The fourth ring reads: External/community supports, Sexual health providers, District health board, Maori health providers, Police youth aid, Family GPs, Minsitry of Education, Counsellors, Iwi and maori elders, Youth services WINZ, Child protection team, CYF, Church, Psychiatrist, CAMHS, Drug and alcohol support and Child development services.