Appendix 6: Sharing with parents and whānau

ERO has shared the following information with the parents and whānau of students participating in Year 9 Plus.

Year 9 Plus 2016 - The 2016 learning journey

Three steps towards student engagement and success:

Graphic showing examples of three steps: Initial, Aspirational and Exceptional.

 

Key findings

ERO found there were three groups amongst the Year 9 Plus students:

1. Initial steps (the largest group of students)

What does success look like for the students who were in this group?

  • getting to school more often
  • staying at school the whole year
  • being more settled in class and playground
  • getting on better with other students.

What did the students in this group say worked for or helped them in 2016?

All students in this group said their champion was a big help with getting them to school and class, and helping them settle.

Some students in this group said that a teacher helped. This was usually a teacher who was teaching a subject they liked, or who showed an interest in helping them to do better in the things they found hard.

2. Aspirational (a smaller group of students)

What does success look like for the students who were in this group?

  • taking advantage of new educational opportunities such as learning new languages or trying new physical activity e.g. waka ama or carving
  • getting better grades
  • sporting or cultural successes over the year such as being selected for a representative sport team
  • doing well in school activities such as science or mathematics that they previously found too hard.

What did the students in this group say worked for or helped them in 2016?

Teachers who:

  • made learning relevant and interesting for them
  • checked in with them - about their understanding and then explained it in a way they found helpful
  • built on their strengths.

Champions and teachers who worked together to:

  • set goals and lift aspirations
  • regularly check up on their progress
  • share helpful feedback or recognise or reward their successes.

The champion helped them by:

  • connecting early with their whānau and forming a strong relationship with them
  • helping their whānau to understand that keeping their child in school is important
  • getting to know them well - who they are, their whānau/home background
  • being prepared to share with the school the whānau view on the students' behalf.

Some students said their champion was the main contributor to their successes.

3. Exceptional (a few students)

What does success look like for the students in this group?

  • changing what they think about themselves, what their future looks like, and what they can achieve
  • knowing themselves better, their strengths, where they want to be in the future and focusing on it
  • planning what they need to do to reach their goals and seeking help to get there
  • leading their own personal changes
  • actively arranging the support they need and being willing to share support with others.

What did the students in this group say worked for or helped them in 2016?

  • when whānau supported their aspirations they felt like they had their backing and they were proud of them
  • when other students looked to them for leadership it encouraged them to step up more and to encourage them to do well too.