Brooklyn School (Motueka) - 26/09/2017

Summary

Brooklyn School caters for children in Years 1 to 8 and has a roll of 105 children, 27 of whom identify as Māori.

School staffing is stable and an experienced chairperson leads the board. Succession planning and training has supported 3 new members in their role as trustees.

Considerable progress in addressing the recommendations outlined in the 2014 ERO report has been made. The curriculum has been completed and is now embedded. In practice, the strategic plans clearly reflect the school’s priorities and valued outcomes for children. The appraisal process is more rigorous and focused on ongoing improvement of teaching practice. Children have improved opportunities to experience te reo and tikanga Māori.

Achievement over time shows that most children maintain good levels of achievement against the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. School leaders and teachers use a range of effective programmes and interventions to reduce disparity, particularly in reading.

Leaders and teachers actively contribute to the Motueka Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school effectively responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Leaders and teachers are focused on improving student achievement and most students are achieving well. They have useful systems in place to support children to make a range of sufficient progress over their time at school. Leaders and teachers clearly identify the areas of the curriculum that need improving through professional learning and development.

A strength of the school is the learning children do across all areas of the New Zealand Curriculum within their unique location.

At the time of this review children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • evaluate the impact of interventions and changes to practice that are planned to raise children’s achievement

  • develop consistency of judgements with other schools through shared moderation

  • increase the consistency of how teachers report accelerated progress and rates of progress that individual children make over time.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school effectively responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The 2016 achievement information shows that most children achieved at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The disparity between some learners in mathematics is being addressed by teachers. This includes individual teaching and working with parents to support their children’s learning at home.

Māori children are achieving well against the National Standards in writing and mathematics. Targeted children are receiving appropriate learning support to accelerate their progress in these areas.

Teachers deliberately stimulate children’s curiosity through differing learning experiences in and beyond the school. They encourage children to actively research information and demonstrate ako by sharing their learning with each other. Teachers effectively use a range of assessments to identify children’s needs and strengths. Highly experienced teacher aides provide targeted learning support.

The next step is for teachers to moderate their overall teacher judgments across schools to ensure shared consistency of decisions between schools.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has a range of effective processes and practices that are enabling equity and excellence.

ommunity to refresh the school’s values, vision and strategic direction. The board is well informed about children’s achievement, needs and wellbeingThe board and school leaders work collaboratively to promote positive outcomes for children. They regularly consult with the c.

Teachers benefit from professional learning and development (PLD) opportunities that are clearly linked to building their capability and raising children’s achievement.

The school provides good opportunities for children to learn te reo and tikanga Māori with support from a specialist teacher of Māori. Children are able to participate in kapa haka, learn harakeke weaving, waiata, local stories and the protocols associated with visiting their local marae. Teachers are continuing to build their confidence in the use of te reo Māori.

Children experience a localised and authentic curriculum that provides rich and broad opportunities. The school engages in a culturally responsive approach focussed on promoting kaitiakitanga in caring for the local environment. Tuakana teina relationships where older children support their younger peers with their learning, is a feature of the school’s programme.

Children with additional needs are well supported in a positive, inclusive environment. Leaders and teachers follow useful processes to gather information about individual children’s learning and create individual pathways for success.

Strong learner-centred relationships between the school and parents, whānau and the local community promote equity and excellence for all children.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

Leaders and teachers have effective systems to ensure children are making sufficient progress over their time at the school and to identify the areas of the curriculum that need improving.

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school needs to:

  • evaluate the impact of interventions and changes to practice that are planned to raise children’s achievement

  • increase the consistency of how teachers report accelerated progress and rates of progress that individual children make over time.

  • develop consistency of assessment judgements with other schools through shared moderation.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

26 September 2017

About the school

Location

Motueka

Ministry of Education profile number

3185

School type

Full Primary Years 1 to 8

School roll

105

Gender composition

Boys 51%

Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 69%

Māori 26%

Samoan 1%

Asian 1%

Other 3%

Review team on site

July-August 2017

Date of this report

26 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review May 2014

Education Review April 2011