Burnside Primary School - 01/08/2017

Findings

The board, school leaders and teachers have made good progress towards addressing the priorities for improvement identified in the 2015 ERO report. While some actions are in the early stages of implementation, progress has been made in the key areas for promoting positive outcomes for children’s learning. The school is now in a better position to further develop internal evaluation practices, improve student achievement and reduce disparity in educational outcomes for all learners.

ERO will review the school on the regular review cycle. The next review will be in 2018. 

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

The 2015 ERO report identified a period of significant challenge resulting from rapid roll growth and the redefining of the school’s community. The board, school leaders and teachers needed to place more emphasis on raising student achievement and building internal evaluation capacity.

Since the 2015 review the school has been proactive in working with the Ministry of Education (MoE) and seeking advice from the New Zealand School Trustees Association (NZSTA).

The school roll has continued to increase. School and board leadership has remained stable. There have been changes in staff and some new trustees have been appointed. The school is to be rebuilt. The board is working with the MoE to plan for the new school.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

The 2015 ERO report identified the following priority areas for review and development:

  • student achievement
  • appraisal
  • internal evaluation practices
  • board induction. 

Progress

School leaders and teachers have made good progress in using student achievement information to raise student achievement.

The work of a student achievement advisor from the MoE has had a positive impact in developing a stronger shared vision for raising student achievement. This has supported school leaders and teachers to develop systems that are more strongly focused on children whose learning and progress needs to be accelerated.

Teachers use student achievement information in more focused ways to monitor children’s learning progress and achievement. School targets clearly identify children who need additional support with learning. Teachers focus their teaching on ways to accelerate achievement. Useful planning is supporting teachers to work towards the school targets.

The board regularly receives reports on the progress and achievement of children in the school target groups to inform the board in its decision making.

Key next steps

The school needs to improve the responsiveness of its processes and practices in raising the achievement of some groups of children. In particular, for its Māori and Pacific children and for boys. The interventions teachers have in place to respond to children whose learning needs acceleration are effective for some groups of children but not for all children.

Key priorities for the board, school leaders and teachers to support equity and excellence for all learners are to:

  • raise overall levels of student achievement
  • identify and address in-school disparity
  • develop a consistent shared understanding of effective practices for improving progress and acceleration, and to be clear about how this information should be reported to the board.

Appraisal

Progress

There has been considerable emphasis on professional learning to strengthen appraisal. There is evidence of:

  • an improvement in reflection on teaching practice
  • an alignment between achievement targets, student needs and annual planning
  • a clear framework to support teacher reflection
  • connections with charter goals in the principal’s appraisal.

Key Next steps

School leaders now need to ensure the appraisal and attestation processes are sufficiently documented for accountability purposes.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The school is sufficiently well placed to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance.

The school’s values are embedded in the curriculum and recognised across the school. A strong culture of collegiality and openness to learning is evident at governance, leadership and teaching team level. Teaching teams focus on the specific needs of identified groups of learners.

Internal Evaluation and Board Practices

The school has made progress in developing a sustainable cycle of planning, improvement and internal evaluation. There is evidence of:

  • clearer priorities for evaluation and planning to guide school development
  • external support to help guide a full evaluation of the school curriculum
  • improved teacher capability for evaluation and reflection, at individual and team levels, which is supported by a framework for teacher inquiry
  • governance support and documentation for effectively inducting new board members
  • a clear work plan for board work, which aligns with leadership work plans

NZSTA support for the board in developing governance practices.

Key next steps

The improvements to systems and practices are in the early stages of development. Important next steps for school leaders and the board are to improve and embed:

  • whole school knowledge and capability around effective evaluation (processes, practices and documentation)
  • the consistency and quality of teacher inquiries into their practice and impact on student progress and achievement
  • the evaluative thinking and quality of analysis of information in the school’s analysis of effectiveness in meeting school targets.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

4 Recommendations

Recommendations, including any to other agencies for ongoing or additional support.

ERO recommends that the school continues its work with NZSTA and the MoE to improve student achievement and promote equity and excellence for all learners.

Conclusion

The board, school leaders and teachers have made good progress towards addressing the priorities for improvement identified in the 2015 ERO report. While some actions are in the early stages of implementation, progress has been made in the key areas for promoting positive outcomes for children’s learning. The school is now in a better position to further develop internal evaluation practices, improve student achievement and reduce disparity in educational outcomes for all learners.

ERO will review the school on the regular review cycle. The next review will be in 2018.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

1 August 2017

About the School 

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

3305

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

265

Number of international students

0

Gender composition

Boys: 47%

Girls: 53%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
Chinese
African
Filipino
Indian
Middle East
Other Asian
Other Ethnicities

25%
31%
5%
5%
5%
4%
4%
4%
9%
8%

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

1 August 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Supplementary Review

September 2015
June 2012
October 2009