Fraser Crescent School - 12/09/2017

Summary

Fraser Crescent School in Upper Hutt, caters for 262 children in Years 1 to 6. Of the learners enrolled, 37% identify as Māori and 2% have Pacific heritage.

Experienced and newly elected members make up the board of trustees.Since the July 2014 ERO report, the roll has steadily increased. This has resulted in ongoing additions to staffing. A new deputy principal was appointed in 2016.

Teachers are regularly involved in a range of professional learning and development through external and internal initiatives to promote positive learner outcomes.

The school’s Fraser Values - Future Focused, Respectful, Active Adventurers, who are Striving for Success, Enthusiastic and Resourceful - are focus on supporting children’s learning and wellbeing and are well highly visible throughout the school. These valuesknown by them, staff and the community.

The school participates in a collaborative cluster of local schools with a focus on strengthening school developments, particularly student engagement.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is developing its capability to effectively respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Sound processes are in place for identifying, tracking and monitoring student progress and achievement.

Data for 2016, indicated that many students achieved at and above in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. In comparison with outcomes for girls, disparity for boys in writing was evident. Teachers’ inquiries are focused on writing in 2017, in response to this identified need.

Student wellbeing is a key focus for trustees, leaders and teachers. Parents and whānau have flexible opportunities to meet with teachers, discuss their child’s progress, and gain knowledge about how they can support learning at home.

Key next steps include: strengthening target setting; monitoring and reporting of accelerated learning; improving the use of teachers’ inquiry and school internal evaluation.Trustees and leaders recognise the need to sharpen the focus on accelerating student progress.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is developing its capability to effectively respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The school has yet to have a sustained upward trajectory of improved achievement for all students gender and ethnic .Achievement information, over time, indicates variable outcomes and disparities for differentgroups. Disparity between these groups has reduced significantly in 2016.

School achievement data for 2016, showed that the achievement of Māori learners was similar to that of their peers. School data also shows that a number of students have made accelerated progress.

Approximately two thirds of students achieve at or above the writing and mathematics National Standards. Slightly more students achieve at the expected level in reading. To achieve equitable outcomes, the school is taking a considered approach to reviewing boys’ achievement in writing.

Good systems are in place to support dependable teacher judgements in writing. The school has identified the need to strengthen moderation practices in reading and mathematics.Teachers know students well and use a range of assessment tools to identify, respond to and monitor individual learning needs.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

School trustees, leaders and teachers have a strong focus on improving the wellbeing of children, particularly those at risk of poor wellbeing outcomes.Student engagement and learning is supported by well-promoted school values and respectful, reciprocal relationships between children and with teachers.

Learners have differentiated programmes that target their identified needs.Emphasis is placed on teachers working collaboratively to address the diverse needs of children at risk of poor educational outcomes.

Children with additional learning needs are well identified and appropriately supported. External agencies are accessed when required.

Trustees receive a range of useful school information to support decision making and resourcing.

Through ongoing curriculum review, leaders and teachers have developed clear guidelines for effective teaching practice and assessment. These include expectations for culturally responsive teaching practice. Developing learning area implementation plans that include relevant local contexts, is an identified focus for 2017.

Leaders are taking a strategic approach to enhancing meaningful learning partnerships with families and whānau. Parents and whānau have flexible opportunities to meet with teachers, discuss their child’s progress, and gain knowledge about how they can support learning at home. A specific initiative introduced in 2017 is aimed at promoting positive outcomes for targeted Māori students through learning partnerships.

The development of teacher capacity and capability is well supported by an appropriate appraisal system and externally facilitated professional learning and development.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

School leaders, staff and trustees are further developing their understanding of accelerated progress. This should assist them to work towards achieving equity and excellence for all students. Trustees and leaders recognise the need to sharpen the focus on accelerating students’ progress.

ERO’s external evaluation affirms trustees’ and leaders’ identification of the need to continue to:

  • refine school targets to focus on accelerating the progress of students at risk of not achieving

  • focus teachers’ inquiry on effective practices to address the needs of target students

  • regularly track, monitor and report the rate of progress of target students

  • enhance internal evaluation to more effectively and formally analyse the impact and effectiveness of teaching programmes and initiatives on student outcomes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for boys in writing remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

12 September 2017

About the school

Location

Upper Hutt City

Ministry of Education profile number

2844

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

262

Gender composition

Male 54%, Female 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori 37%

Pākehā 43%

African 4%

Indian 3%

Pacific 2%

Other ethnic groups 11%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

12 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review July 2014

Education Review June 2011

Supplementary Review June 2008