Hataitai School - 28/11/2017

Summary

Hataitai School isa Years 1 to 8 primary in suburban Wellington.The roll of 353 children at the time of this review, includes two percent who are Māori, two percent Pacific and others from a diverse range of ethnicities.

senior leaders continue to promote a reflective and responsive organisational culture that supports developing practice and ongoing improvement. Regular property development has upgraded a number of teaching areas to better support modern learning practices.Since the September 2014 ERO evaluation,

Hataitai School is a member of the Wellington East Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Hataitai School is effective in achieving very good learning outcomes for children.

It responds well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Useful processes support children to achieve. There are some examples of reduced disparity of achievement between groups of students within the school. However, information for 2014 to 2016 shows that the school has not yet achieved equitable learning outcomes for Māori students in reading and writing.

Further developments to support the school’s ongoing improvement involve extending the use of innovative learning practices and refining strategic planning.

earners are achieving well. The school demonstrates some good progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.L

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Hataitai School responds well to those Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school’s 2016 student achievement data shows that most children achieve well in relation to National Standards and that all or almost all achieve at or above the Standards at Year 8. Overall achievement at or above the Standards in reading, writing and mathematics has remained consistently high from 2014 to 2016. In 2016, Māori children’s achievement in mathematics is similar to their peers in the school. Pacific children’s progress is tracked individually by senior leaders.

There are some examples of reduced disparity of achievement between groups of students within the school. However, the information for 2014 to 2016 shows that the school has not yet achieved and sustained in-school equity of learning outcomes for Māori students in reading and writing.

Students with additional learning needs are closely monitored. They benefit from well-designed programmes to meet their individual learning needs. Their progress is tracked to evaluate how effectively interventions are promoting their achievement.

Teachers use a variety of useful moderation processes to ensure the dependability of their assessment judgements about children’s achievement in relation to National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The inclusive culture of the school supports children’s wellbeing for success to reach their potential. Senior leaders and teachers value the importance of knowing children and families very well. This, and an ethic of care, is modelled by the senior leadership team.

Trustees and senior leaders attribute children’s success to the school’s ongoing connectedness with families, and the vision and values that underpin school operations. Parents have many opportunities for input to the strategic decision making and direction of the school and to know about their children’s learning. The school’s community provides strong support in a variety of ways.

Teachers use a range of useful, school-based and standardised assessment tools. Achievement information is used well by staff to plan learning programmes to respond to children’s individual learning needs. Specific learning goals are developed for each student and are shared with parents and whānau. Their progress is well monitored, tracked and reported.

Teachers are increasingly personalising learning. There is a strong emphasis on developing children’s awareness and management of their own learning. Their input is valued by staff and informs teaching programmes and the choice of activities offered.Ongoing review of the school curriculum includes the development and use of digital technology and inquiry learning to enhance engagement and achievement.

Children benefit from positive, affirming relationships with their teachers. The purposeful, settled and attractive environments promote learning. Children are highly engaged in, and talk knowledgeably about, their learning.

extensive opportunities to participate and celebrate success in cultural, artistic, sporting and leadership activities. Many activities and events enable students to learn about and celebrate Māori culture and language.The inclusive curriculum provides children with

Senior leaders encourage teachers to lead aspects of the curriculum. Professional development is appropriately focused on introducing new methodologies and growing teachers’ professional practice. Teachers use research and evidence to inquire into the effectiveness of strategies and approaches intended to enhance engagement and promote improved outcomes for children.

The board is well informed about the progress and achievement that children make over time. Trustees bring expertise and skills to their roles and undertake relevant board training. They scrutinise student achievement information and focus on enhancing learning and achievement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has many structures and processes in place to raise children’s achievement, and is well placed to continue making improvements that impact positively on children’s learning.

Next steps are to:

  • maintain the focus on identifying and reducing in-school disparity of learning outcomes for Māori and other students
  • refine strategic planning to include clear indicators of expected outcomes for learners that will support and enhance internal evaluation and continuous improvement
  • continue to extend and embed the schoolwide teaching philosophies and practices that promote innovative educational practices to extend student agency.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates some good progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Next steps are to:

  • maintain the focus on identifying and reducing in-school disparity of learning outcomes for Māori and other students
  • refine strategic planning to include clear indicators of expected outcomes that will support and enhance internal evaluation and continuous improvement
  • continue to extend and embed the school wide teaching philosophies and practices that promote innovative educational practices to extend student agency.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

28 November 2017

About the school

Location

Hataitai School, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2854

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

353

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Asian
Pacific
Other ethnic groups

  2%
79%
  6%
  2%
11%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

28 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

September 2014
September 2011
December 2008