Havelock North Primary School - 27/06/2016

Findings

Havelock North Primary School has made significant progress since the February 2015 ERO report. A robust policy framework and good systems and processes are now in place for promoting student wellbeing. The board, senior leaders and teachers are continuing to strengthen and embed improvements in their response to Māori students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

Havelock North Primary School caters for Year 1 to 6 students, in the centre of the village of Havelock North. The school has a growing roll, with 82% Pākehā, 12% Māori and an increasing number of students from other ethnic groups.

Since the February 2015 ERO report, the school has experienced significant changes in personnel including:

  • a new board chair and a number of trustees elected in 2015
  • a new principal appointed mid-2015.

The previous ERO review found many areas of strength related to learning, curriculum and sustainable practices. However, significant improvements were needed to school policies and practices related to student wellbeing and responses to support Māori learners. Following the 2015 ERO report, the then board and principal developed goals within their annual planning, in consultation with ERO. This has provided a framework to guide improvements in key areas.

External support was sought to build internal capability so that changes are sustained and enhanced.

This 2016 ERO report evaluates the progress made and how well placed the school is to sustain continuous improvement.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

The February 2015 ERO report identified the following as key areas for improvement:

  • systems and practices to support student wellbeing
  • school effectiveness in promoting Māori success as Māori
  • the board’s policy and procedural framework for guiding school operations in areas of personnel, health and safety and student wellbeing.

Progress

The school has successfully addressed the areas for development. The board and senior leaders have strengthened systems and structures that support sustainability. Significant improvements are evident.

The board has rigorously reviewed and subsequently developed a well-defined framework of policies and procedures for supporting:

  • health, safety and student wellbeing
  • good practices in relation to personnel
  • dealing with and reviewing traumatic experiences and critical incidents in the school.

Clear schoolwide guidelines for implementing wellbeing strategies, interventions and programmes are in place. These assist teachers to act with a sense of agency, based on the needs of students and their responsibilities under legislation. Active monitoring of the wellbeing of students supports timely responses.

Leaders respond to wellbeing needs of adults. Systematic processes for induction and professional learning and development assist teachers to develop skills to effectively support student wellbeing.

Evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building have significantly improved. Multiple sources of evidence are used to find out about student wellbeing, identify vulnerable students and recognise areas for improvement.

In response to evaluation findings, leaders and the board have strengthened curriculum programmes that support students to learn and develop skills in self-management and relationships with others. Leaders are actively promoting students' involvement in leading change.

School values are in the process of being redefined with the community and students. Students spoken to by ERO articulated important ways of behaving and treating others, well-aligned to the schools values in the charter. Notions of respect, aroha, resilience and excellence support students’ care and sense of belonging.

Since the previous ERO report, a more collaborative approach is being taken to improve school capacity to foster Māori success as Māori. A ‘think tank’ team of teachers and leaders is leading curriculum development to include additional Māori language and cultural references within learning programmes.

The board and senior leaders have used Hautū: Māori Cultural Responsiveness Self Review tool for Boards of Trustees to help decide how well the school is positioned and actions for the future. Next steps include:

  • further curriculum development to more explicitly reflect New Zealand Curriculum principles
  • continuing to deliberately and more strategically raise teacher capability in responding to Māori students
  • extending the growing relationships with whānau Māori into community empowerment and strong learning partnerships.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and continue to improve its performance. Significant progress is evident in strengthened policy and procedural frameworks, sound governance and systems that support student wellbeing and improved internal evaluation.

High levels of student achievement have been sustained and improved since the previous ERO review. Student progress, in relation to schoolwide targets, is more clearly reported to the board.

School leaders are developing further clarity in analysis, collaborative sense-making and evaluative commentary in reports to the board about student wellbeing. This should help target setting, strategic planning and internal evaluation for ongoing improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Havelock North Primary School has made significant progress since the February 2015 ERO report. A robust policy framework and good systems and processes are now in place for promoting student wellbeing. The board, senior leaders and teachers are continuing to strengthen and embed improvements in their response to Māori students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Joyce Gebbie Deputy

Chief Review Officer Central

27 June 2016

About the School

Location

Havelock North

Ministry of Education profile number

2573

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

534

Gender composition

Female 51%, Male 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

12%

82%

6%

Review team on site

May 2016

Date of this report

27 June 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

February 2015

October 2010

July 2007