Kimi Ora Community School - 29/06/2017

Summary

Kimi Ora Community School in Flaxmere caters for students in Years 1 to 8. The roll of 131 includes 36% who identify as Māori, and 60% who identify as Pacific. There has been considerable roll growth in the past 18 months. The school is currently undergoing major property redevelopment.

There have been several staff changes since the February 2014 ERO report. A new principal was appointed in Term 3, 2015. In response to roll growth further staff appointments have been made and leadership roles established. A new Board of Trustees was appointed in May 2016.

The school is participating in Ministry of Education (the Ministry) Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) and literacy professional development.

Meaningful progress has been made in addressing the areas identified for development in the previous ERO report.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

In the past 18 months there has been significant progress in establishing systems and processes that support productive learning underpinned by holistic wellbeing. The school reports that a large number of students made expected, or greater than expected, progress in writing and reading in 2016. The school is well placed to strengthen their understanding of accelerated progress and to continue to look at strategies to achieve equity and excellence.

Leadership is proactive in creating a supportive learning environment. Progress is evident in establishing a curriculum framework that gives priority to literacy and numeracy. Focused, needs-based teaching has been established. High expectations for positive behaviour, structured learning environments and student self-management skills contribute to purposeful engagement.

The board of trustees has developed a governance framework focused on raising student achievement. The board, principal and teachers should continue to refine and embed ongoing developments and sustain their emphasis on accelerating achievement.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, raising student achievement overall remains an urgent priority.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Considerable progress has been made to establish dependable achievement information. A shared understanding about the importance of lifting student achievement and progress is evident.

The school reports that in 2016, a large number of students made greater than expected progress in writing and reading. This occurred to a lesser extent in mathematics. Half of Māori learners made 18 months or more progress in reading and writing, and a quarter in mathematics. Half of Pacific learners experienced this level of progress in writing and to a lesser extent in reading and mathematics. Girls made more progress than boys overall.

The school is well placed to strengthen their understanding of accelerated progress and to continue to look at strategies to raise achievement and reduce disparity, particularly in literacy. This should assist the school to work towards achieving equity and excellence for all students.

Schoolwide moderation in writing has occurred, well supported by external literacy facilitators. Good progress has been made to ensure dependable teacher judgements in reading and mathematics. Further work is planned to strengthen this practice.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has made substantial progress in establishing systems and processes that support, productive learning underpinned by holistic wellbeing. Students’ culture, language and identity, and the uniqueness of each child is valued. Warm nurturing relationships are highly evident.

Building on students’ strengths and interests, through physical activity, the arts and cultural experiences is a deliberate focus. Accessing a broader range of local and community learning opportunities is highlighted.

Progress is evident in establishing a curriculum framework that gives priority to literacy and numeracy. There are consistent schoolwide expectations for teaching and learning in key areas. Teaching is informed by assessment data. There are regular opportunities for teachers to discuss and inquire into the data to inform teaching strategies.

Focused, needs-based teaching has been established. Students know what they are learning and are becoming clearer about its purpose. High expectations for positive behaviour, structured learning environments and student self-management skills contribute to purposeful engagement.

Staff professional learning and development is well considered and strategic. Literacy has been a priority and mathematics is the next key area for development. Skilled teacher aides are actively involved in school programmes and initiatives and are valued partners in learning. There is an understanding of the importance of how effective teaching practices support a positive learning culture.

Strategic, proactive leadership underpins a supportive school environment conducive to teaching and learning. Growing student and staff leadership is an ongoing priority. Solution-focused self review informs decision making and leads to positive changes for students.

The board of trustees has developed a governance framework focused on raising student achievement. The strategic plan appropriately recognises the importance of ongoing monitoring of progress to support improved achievement. A robust policy framework and review supports school operations and ongoing initiatives.

Flexible and responsive approaches to meet with parents, whānau and families led to full attendance at the most recent parent interviews. The board and staff recognise the importance of involving parents in their children’s learning.

An appropriate appraisal process has been established for the principal, teaching staff and support staff, aligned to strategic priorities. Further embedding of appraisal practices should support growth in teaching capability.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Trustees, leaders and teachers should continue to refine and embed ongoing developments in:

  • the school curriculum, including assessment practices, the role of the learner, and moderation
  • increasing community involvement in children’s learning and school governance
  • appraisal, inquiry and internal evaluation
  • sustaining the focus on accelerating student achievement
  • reporting to the board including the impact of special programmes and initiatives on student outcomes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, raising overall student achievement remains an urgent priority.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to continue to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child
  • need to continue to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop to support the school to further develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

29 June 2017

About the school

Location

Hastings

Ministry of Education profile number

2746

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

131

Gender composition

Male 50%, Female 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori 36%

Pacific 60%

Pākehā 4%

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

29 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review February 2014

Education Review December 2010

Supplementary Review April 2008