Ohoka School - 26/09/2017

Summary

The school has a roll of 223 children. Since the last review, the school and senior leaders have worked to embed and further develop effective teaching and learning strategies. Five new staff began at the school in 2017. This has meant that the teaching teams have had to revisit expectations for teaching and learning so that there continues to be consistency of practice across the school.

Leaders and teachers actively contribute to the Puketeraki Rangiora Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is highly effective in the way it responds to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school has many effective processes that are enabling achievement of equity and excellence.

Children participate and learn in caring, collaborative learning communities. Effective, culturally responsive teaching strategies support and promote children's learning.

School leaders ensure an orderly and supportive environment that is conducive to children's learning and wellbeing. Parents, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning.

The board effectively represents and serves the school and education community.

The board and school leaders need to continue to develop effective ways of identifying the impact of initiatives on learning and other outcomes for children.

At the time of this review, children were highly engaged in a curriculum with sufficient interest and challenge to meet their needs and interests.

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is highly effective in the way it responds to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Most children, including Maori and Pacific children, are achieving well against the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Identified groups of priority learners receive targeted learning programmes. The priority groups include children who would benefit from extension programmes. The progress of priority learners is regularly monitored and reported to the board.

The school has a strong focus on its vision and core values of being caring and creative, open-minded, optimistic leaders and learners. This is evident in the environment, and in the way adults and children behave.

Teachers’ judgements about children’s achievement are based on comprehensive, rigorous assessment processes.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s processes are very effective in supporting equity and excellence.

Children participate and learn in caring, collaborative learning communities. The core values include caring for others. All teachers work together for the benefit of all children and have collective responsibility for them. Children, teachers, parents and whanau participate in curriculum design and decision making.

Effective, culturally responsive pedagogy supports and promotes children's learning. The school's culturally responsive action plan details a number of initiatives that teachers are undertaking to recognise and celebrate biculturalism and cultural diversity. Maori perspectives are evident in the environment and planned for in curriculum programmes. Teachers have made good progress, and are aware that they need to continue to develop this aspect of the school.

School leaders ensure an orderly and supportive environment that is conducive to children's learning and wellbeing. Leaders are highly reflective, and strategic in their approach to school leadership. Teachers who are new to the school are well resourced and supported. Clear expectations for learning and teaching are easily accessible and evident in practice.

Parents, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning. Parents receive regular real-time updates on their children's learning and can easily provide comment. They have a wide range of ways that they can be involved in supporting children's learning at home. The school's communication plan provides a strategic approach to managing communication with the community.

The board effectively represents and serves the school and education community. Trustees bring a diverse and useful range of skills and experiences to the board. They actively participate in learning-based teams to promote their goal of every child having “the ultimate learning experience”.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school’s evaluative processes could be further developed to identify and build on the impact of its many initiatives.

The board and school leaders need to be more specific in identifying and recording the impact of their initiatives. While there is ongoing discussion among leaders and trustees about student achievement and the outcome of various programmes, there is little evidence of any conclusions reached about programme effectiveness, or decisions about next steps. Identifying success criteria at the start of an initiative and using them to evaluate outcomes would assure leaders and trustees that their initiatives are achieving the desired outcomes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

The agreed next step is to further refine the school’s evaluative processes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

26 September 2017

About the school

Location

North Canterbury

Ministry of Education profile number

3451

School type

Full primary (Year 1-8)

School roll

223

Gender composition

Girls 53%

Boys 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori 0.5%

Pākehā 87%

Other 12.5%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

26 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

2012

2009

2005