Parklands School (Motueka) - 28/09/2017

Summary

At the time of this review, the Parklands School roll was 240, including 76 Māori children.

Special features of the school include a Māori bilingual class and an attached technology centre for Years 7 to 8 children in the district.

A new principal was appointed to the school in Term 3, 2016. Staffing is stable with many long-serving leaders and teachers. The board is a mix of experienced and recently-elected trustees.

A Ministry of Education (MoE) advisor has worked with the school and some teachers have participated in MoE programmes to improve learning and teaching.

The school is a member of the Motueka Kāhui Ako| Community of Learning (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school has yet to achieve equitable outcomes for all children.

Since the beginning of 2017 the school has been strongly focused on accelerating the achievement of students who are at risk of underachievement. The school leaders have made effective use of internal evaluation to develop and implement a new organisational structure. This includes systems and practices to improve the quality of learning and teaching. These developments have been well accepted by staff and children. The school needs more time to embed and evaluate the effectiveness of these new approaches in accelerating student achievement, particularly for Māori and Pacific children, and for boys.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to embed recent initiatives to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted acceleration of student achievement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school has yet to effectively respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Māori and Pacific children and boys are achieving less well than their peers against National Standards in reading and writing. Children are making similar progress in the National Standards in mathematics.

Children with additional learning needs are well supported in their learning and the school environment. Their parents are kept well informed about their learning and wellbeing.

The school has made effective use of internal evaluation and external support to put in place systems and practices to accelerate children’s progress. These systems and practices identify, plan for and closely monitor the progress of children who need their progress accelerated.

Significantly more accurate and consistent assessment and moderation processes had been achieved by the end of 2016. This is due to school leaders’ effective use of internal evaluation, targeted professional development and robust monitoring practices. Some teachers are beginning to use a national evaluation tool to further strengthen their judgements. The school has yet to establish regular moderation with other schools to improve consistency across schools.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has a number of new processes that are in the early stages of implementation. It is too early to make judgements on their effectiveness in enabling equity and excellence.

The board and senior leaders have set a strong goal to improve student achievement and accelerate the progress of children at risk of not achieving success in their learning. The new operational structure is well aligned to achieving this goal and ensuring that the quality of learning and teaching significantly improves. Teachers support the implementation of the new structure. They are beginning to identify the ways changes to their teaching practices are improving outcomes for children.

Internal evaluation is effectively used to gather opinions from the many groups involved in the school, and to identify what is going well and where change needs to occur. The strategic plan goals are closely linked to the school’s vision and values, professional development and staff appraisal. Action plans are actively monitored and progress in implementing the plans is regularly reported to the board.

School leaders work together effectively. They share the same vision and goals for improving student achievement. They have put in place robust systems and practices to support teachers to improve their practice. Leaders closely monitor progress in teaching practice and children’s achievement.

The board, school leaders and teachers place a high priority on children’s wellbeing and physical safety. Children are well supported to develop strategies to help them manage their behaviour, work cooperatively with others and respect individual differences. Leaders and teachers know the children and their families well. They provide the resources for children to participate fully in the curriculum. Classrooms are calm and children are actively involved in their learning.

Te āo Māori is highly evident in classrooms and at school events. Many teachers have considerable skills in this area. They support the integration of te reo and tikanga Māori into all aspects of school life. Māori children are proud to be Māori. All children have many opportunities to understand and enjoy New Zealand’s bicultural heritage.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The board and school leaders have put a number of new systems and practices in place. It is too early for ERO to evaluate how well these systems and practices are supporting the school to achieve equity and excellence for all children.

Leaders need to extend internal evaluation practices to evaluate the impact of the new operational structure in improving student achievement, and the quality of learning and teaching.

The board, school leaders and teachers must improve student achievement and accelerate the progress of those children at risk of not achieving successful learning outcomes.

Leaders need to continue to build teachers’ capability so that children take more responsibility for their learning. In particular children need to be more involved in setting their own learning goals and contributing to curriculum decisions.

Leaders need to review the school curriculum document to ensure it provides sufficient guidance and clear expectations for teaching and learning. The school curriculum document also needs to reflect the school’s strong commitment to te reo and tikanga Māori.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory of the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

No International students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school is not yet well placed to accelerate the progress of children who need it. The school is developing capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to embed recent initiatives to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

The principal has advised ERO that the school will continue to work with the Ministry of Education (MoE) to:

  • embed recent improvement initiatives
  • address key priorities for further development such as strengthening internal evaluation practices, including curriculum and charter review.

ERO acknowledges and supports this ongoing improvement partnership between the school and MoE.

ERO also requires the school to report progress regarding achievement and other key priorities at identified times over the next 18 months.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer – Southern (Te Waipounamu)

28 September 2017

About the school

Location

Motueka

Ministry of Education profile number

3213

School type

Full Primary (Years 1-8)

School roll

240

Gender composition

Boys 55% : Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori 32%

Pakeha 53%

Pacific 4%

Other 11%

Provision of Māori medium education

Yes

Number of Māori medium classes

1

Total number of students in Māori medium (MME)

11

Number of students in Level 2 MME

2

Review team on site

July and August 2017

Date of this report

28 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014

Education Review October 2010

Education Review January 2008