Pembroke School - 12/09/2017

Summary

Pembroke School, on the outskirts of Stratford, caters for 63 learners in Years 1 to 8. This includes six children who identify as Māori and four as Pacific.

Since the March 2014 ERO report, the school has undergone significant changes that have had an impact on sustaining student engagement, progress and achievement. Some staff are new to the school. Some children have had several teachers over a short period of time.

A new principal was appointed in February 2017. Since this appointment, a range of improvement focused initiatives has been implemented, to accelerate the progress of those children at risk of not achieving in relation to the National Standards.

The previous ERO report recommended that the school review the curriculum. This review began this year. The current trustees have identified a need to clarify their roles and responsibilities.

The school participates in the Stratford Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school has well-considered plans and actions that respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. School information in 2016 indicated that a significant number of learners achieved below and well below in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori children had similar outcomes to their peers.

In 2017, using moderated information, achievement targets are clearly focused on addressing the disparity of boys’ achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. Effective professional guidance by the principal assists the implementation of carefully considered initiatives to support targeted learners.

Strengthening of te ao Māori in the curriculum, with external expertise, is having a positive impact on Māori children’s sense of belonging. This development also supports a bicultural curriculum for all learners.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for some remains.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school has begun to implement well-considered plans to respond to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Teaching strategies and assessment processes, with regular tracking and monitoring, are supporting classroom teachers to meet targets.

Some children achieve well. The school has yet to get a significant number of learners achieving as expected. The principal and teachers know learners well and have assessment information that helps them make appropriate decisions about teaching and learning.Boys feature in the group the school is targeting to accelerate progress.

All Māori children’s progress and achievement is well known by the principal, who has introduced efficient tracking and monitoring systems for all students. This includes the tracking of Pacific children.

In 2017, the moderation process has been strengthened to increase the dependability of the judgements teachers make about student achievement in relation to National standards. Teachers use a range of tools to assess achievement. Baseline data provides the school with clarity of where children are at and what their next steps may be.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

To achieve equity and excellence, school processes have been strengthened to focus on learner wellbeing, engagement and progress. The principal has facilitated appropriate improvements since being appointed and teachers have implemented the changes.

Deliberate actions for improvement include:

  • listening to student and family voices

  • engaging students in a range of activities that interest them

  • developing a collaborative culture between adults and students

  • implementing systems that are clear and student focused for ongoing improvement

  • building a strong sense of belonging

  • having high expectations that all will succeed.

The school has a positive climate. Relationships are respectful between children and with teachers. Māori children’s culture is valued. Families are welcomed into the school and their contribution is valued as partners in student learning.

Teachers use student information to inform teaching. They participate in:

  • professional learning opportunities to strengthen inquiry into their teaching practice
  • robust dialogue about children and their learning
  • the ongoing development and implementation of a new school curriculum.

Teacher aides, with the principal and external resource people, are integral in the plan for improvement of student achievement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

To achieve equity and excellence in learner outcomes, the school will need to continue with the direction now being taken to:

  • collaboratively improve the documented curriculum that includes expectations for teaching practice
  • further support teacher professional development through the appraisal system
  • extend the use of assessment information for classroom teaching and reporting to the board
  • improve the capability of trustees to provide effective governance, including financial management, through ongoing training to support their stewardship role
  • strengthen trustees’ capacity to seek information about student progress and achievement for resourcing decision making
  • embed current initiatives.

ERO’s evaluation affirms this direction and in addition identifies the need for capacity building in internal evaluation for accountability and improvement, focused on equitable and excellent outcomes for children.

Many newly implemented processes are likely to support improved student achievement. Regular evaluation to ascertain effectiveness is needed.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

In order to improve practice:

  • the school must prepare a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum, at least once in every two years, after consultation with the school community. [Section 60B Education Act 1989 ]

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for some children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to embed the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.
  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

12 September 2017

About the school 

Location

Stratford

Ministry of Education profile number

2220

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

63

Gender composition

Female 35, Male 28

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 53
Māori 6
Pacific 4

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

12 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, May 2014
Education Review, March 2011
Education Review, April 2008