Rangitoto School - 26/10/2017

Summary

Rangitoto School is located east of Te Kuiti and caters for children in Years 1 to 8. The current roll of 39 includes 21 Māori children. The roll has fluctuated over recent years.

Since the May 2014 ERO review, a number of trustees on the board have continued, and with new trustees they contribute a wide range of skills to their stewardship role. A new principal started at the beginning of 2017 and there has been some change to the teaching staff.

The school is involved in the Te Kuiti Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako, which is in the establishment phase of its development.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is effectively responding to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Processes in relation to the school’s curriculum, teaching practice, professional leadership and parent partnerships are effectively enabling achievement of equity and excellence in the school.

The school requires further developments in the use of achievement information, policy review and development, and internal evaluation capability.

At the time of this review most children were achieving at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO and the school have identified aspects of internal evaluation systems that need further development.

Agreed next steps are to strengthen:

  • the use of internal evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building for improvement and innovation

  • moderation processes to support teachers to make dependable overall teacher judgements in relation to National Standards

  • the use of learning progressions and exemplars that support children to better understand their achievement and determine their next steps for learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

The school is effectively responding to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

At the end of 2016, school achievement information showed that most children were achieving or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori children achieved at similar levels to their non-Māori peers at the school. The proportion of boys achieving at or above the National Standards in writing and reading is slightly below that of girls.

The school’s mid-year data shows that some children have already made accelerated progress and many others are tracking towards meeting the National Standards by the end of 2017.

The principal recognises that there is a need to strengthen processes for determining overall teacher judgements (OTJs) in relation to the National Standards. Participation in the Te Kuiti Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako to share moderation practices is also likely to strengthen OTJs.

There are currently no children with identified special learning needs, but the school has processes in place to support their needs as required.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Processes in relation to the school’s curriculum, teaching practice, professional leadership and parent partnerships are effectively enabling achievement of equity and excellence in the school.

The school’s curriculum is increasingly responsive to Māori children. An emphasis on te ao Māori, which includes whakatau for visitors, daily karakia and kapa haka is contributing to children’s cultural understandings, wellbeing and identity. All staff are supported by a knowledgeable teacher in the use of te reo and tikanga Māori.

Teachers are increasingly focused on providing learning programmes that aim to raise the achievement of all children and particularly those whose achievement needs acceleration. They use achievement information in reading, writing and mathematics to guide their planning and respond effectively to the learning needs at-risk learners and other children.

The principal is effectively leading professional learning in the school. He has a strong understanding and knowledge about modern education theory and practice. Teachers are well supported by the principal to implement effective teaching and learning practice. Teaching as inquiry is increasingly focused on accelerating the progress of children who are most at risk of not achieving.

Parents and whānau are informed about the progress and achievement of their children. They receive useful information about children’s progress and achievement in written reports and informal discussions. Parents are increasingly supported to be partners in their children’s learning and progress.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further development is needed in the use of achievement information, policy review and development, and internal evaluation capability.

  • The analysis and use of student achievement information requires further strengthening.

  • Trustees and the principal need to implement a strategic approach to the review of policies and procedures.

  • Trustees and teachers need to increase their ability to use internal evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building for improvement and innovation.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Actions required

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • implement a careers and guidance programme for students in Years 7 and 8 so that they are provided with appropriate career education and guidance that is designed to prepare them for future employment.
    [Section 77 Education Act 1989]

  • review and implement behaviour management processes
    [NAG 5; Good practice]

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to strengthen:

  • the use internal evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building for improvement and innovation

  • moderation processes to support teachers to make dependable overall teacher judgements in relation to National Standards

  • the use of learning progressions and exemplars that support children to better understand their achievement and determine their next steps for learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

26 October 2017

About the school

Location

Te Kuiti

Ministry of Education profile number

1920

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

39

Gender composition

Boys 20 Girls 19

Ethnic composition

Māori 21
Pākehā 18

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

26 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review May 2014
Education Review May 2011
Education Review June 2008