Tamariki Akoranga - 10/05/2011

1 The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Tamariki Akoranga provides early childhood education and care for tamariki from birth to school age. It is one branch of the Taumarunui Community Kokiri Trust (the Trust) based on whānau ora and aiming to support the education, health and social needs of the community throughout their lives. Tamariki Akoranga’s kaupapa/ philosophy is centred on te reo Māori me ona tikanga and is underpinned by the core values of the Trust and the principles of Te Whāriki. It uses Māori teaching and learning styles within traditional contexts.

Recent management support has resulted in improved systems for teaching, learning and centre operations.

Teachers work collaboratively to provide a programme strongly reflecting the bicultural values and goals of the centre. Te reo Māori me ona tikanga is soundly embedded in all aspects of the programme. Engagement in satisfying learning is fostered through access to an environment where tamariki select from a range of inviting, stimulating and varying resources and activities. They spend most of the time in child-initiated, play-based activities. The programme is underpinned by the emerging interests and curiosity of tamariki. Clear expectations for behaviour and positive guidance from teachers assist tamariki to relate well to others. Literacy and numeracy learning opportunities in te reo Māori and English are well integrated into daily activities. Tamariki learn to share, negotiate and manage conflict. They are busy and actively involved in learning.

A highly-effective programme supports older tamariki and their whānau to transition from the centre to school. It is based on ‘cultural learning’ where tamariki develop self-confidence through using their language, waiata, karakia and customs. Social and cooperative, life learning, self management and literacy and numeracy skills are also encouraged. Whānau and teachers share relevant information with schools and participate effectively to ease transitions.

Te reo Māori is used extensively in all interactions. Participation in the programme is fostered in a welcoming and inclusive environment featuring nurturing, responsive and respectful interactions between staff, whānau and tamariki. Adults show curiosity, interest and attention to tamariki, who are comfortable in their surroundings.

The identity, language and culture of tamariki Māori and their whānau are highly valued through the philosophy, programmes, interactions and actions of all people associated with the service. Intergenerational involvement and strong whnau links between staff and tamariki contribute to the wairua of the centre.ä

Partnership with whānau is meaningfully enhanced by teachers’ understanding and valuing the aspirations whānau have for tamariki, and the cultural knowledge and expertise of all staff in the centre.

Te reo Māori me ona tikanga strongly support tamariki Māori and their whānau to engage in learning and “stand in their own mana”.

Future Action

ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

2 Review Priorities

The Focus of the Review

Before the review, the management of Tamariki Akoranga Bilingual Early Childhood Learning Centre was invited to consider its priorities for review using guidelines and resources provided by ERO. ERO also used documentation provided by the centre to contribute to the scope of the review.

The detailed priorities for review were then determined following a discussion between the ERO review team and the management and staff. This discussion focused on existing information held by the centre (including self-review information) and the extent to which potential issues for review contributed to positive outcomes for tamariki atTamariki Akoranga Bilingual Early Childhood Learning Centre.

All ERO education reviews in early childhood focus on the quality of education. For ERO this includes the quality of:

  • the programme provided for tamariki;
  • the learning environment; and
  • the interactions between tamariki and adults.

ERO’s findings in these areas are set out below.

The Quality of Education

Background

Tamariki Akoranga provides early childhood education and care for tamariki from birth to school age. It is one branch of the Trust based on whānau ora and aiming to support the education, health and welfare needs of the community throughout their lives. Tamariki Akoranga’s kaupapa/philosophy is centred on te reo Māori me ona tikanga, is underpinned by the core values of the Trust and the principles ofTe Whāriki. It uses Māori teaching and learning styles within traditional contexts.

Staff access high quality expert knowledge and motivation through the annual Trust symposium where renowned leaders in Māori Education present their ideas. They report that this symposium powerfully inspires and stimulates them.

Recent management support has resulted in improved systems for teaching and learning and centre operations.

Areas of strength

Programme

Teachers work collaboratively to provide a programme strongly reflecting the bicultural values and goals of the centre. Te reo Māori me ona tikanga is soundly embedded in all aspects of the programme.

Engagement in satisfying learning for tamariki is fostered through:

  • accessing an environment where they select from a range of inviting, stimulating and varying resources and activities;
  • spending most of the time in child-initiated, play-based activities;
  • participating in imaginative, creative, dramatic and physically challenging endeavours;
  • providing a programme underpinned by the emerging interests and curiosity of tamariki;
  • having clear expectations for behaviour and positive guidance from teachers to assist tamariki to relate well to others; and
  • integrating literacy and numeracy learning opportunities in te reo Māori and English into daily activities.

Tamariki learn to share, negotiate and manage conflict. They are busy and actively involved in learning.

Nutritious meals provided in a social setting, support tamariki to develop their selfhelp and self-care skills.

A highly-effective programme supports older tamariki and their whānau to transition from the centre to school. It is based on ‘cultural learning’ where tamariki develop self confidence through using their language, waiata, karakia and customs. Social and cooperative, self-management and literacy and numeracy skills are also encouraged. Whānau and teachers share relevant information with schools and participate effectively to ease transitions.

Environment

Tamariki access indoor and outdoor areas, including a large covered deck, in the well-designed, purpose-built centre. Their participation in play is nurtured through:

  • appropriate, stimulating and accessible resources; and
  • a rich and varied curriculum.

Tamariki make choices that reflect their needs and interests.

Interactions Te reo Māori is used extensively in all interactions. Participation in the programme is fostered through:

  • a welcoming and inclusive environment for tamariki and their whānau;
  • nurturing, responsive and respectful interactions between staff, whānau and tamariki;
  • sustained conversations; and
  • teachers’ praise and affirmation of the developing competencies of tamariki.

Adults show curiosity, interest and attention to tamariki, who are comfortable in their surroundings.

Self review

Strong involvement of whānau in consultation processes contributes to effective review for improvement. A mixture of planned and spontaneous review guides practice.

Appraisal of teachers focuses on improvement and provides opportunities for teachers to reflect on their practice and receive feedback and support from managers.

Areas for development and review

Assessment

Teachers discuss and make plans to respond to the emerging interests of tamariki. However, assessment processes are fragmented and teachers need to develop their confidence and competence to:

  • record and celebrate significant learning;
  • encourage parent participation in assessment ; and
  • make links from current learning to future directions.

Routines

Some children do not engage well with planned large group activities. Teachers should review these times to ensure that routines do not unduly interfere with children’s opportunity to play and learn.

3 National Evaluation Topic

Overview

ERO provides information about the education system as a whole through its national reports. This information will be used as the basis for long term and systemic educational improvement.

Partnerships with whānau of tamariki Māori in early childhood services

As part of this review ERO evaluated the extent to which:

  • this service understands and values the identity, language and culture of Māori tamariki and their whānau, particularly when the child and whānau transition to the service;
  • managers and educators have built relationships with whānau of Māori tamariki;
  • this service works in partnership with whānau of Māori tamariki.

Background

Tamariki Akoranga’s kaupapa/philosophy states a commitment to “provide ongoing learning opportunities for all; underpinned by te reo Māori me ona tikanga, which identify and enhance the learning of Ngā Tamariki/ Mokopuna Māori, with whānau participation; in the dual cultures of Aotearoa”. The educational programme is based on whakapapa, waiata, whakatauki, korero tawhito and whaikorero.

Areas of strength

The identity, language and culture of Māori tamariki and their whānau are highly valued through the philosophy, programmes, interactions and actions of all people associated with the service. This is evident through:

  • the welcoming environment where Māori language and culture is highly and meaningfully visible;
  • warm, respectful relationships based on whanaungatanga and manaakitanga;
  • a strong sense of belonging and ownership expressed by whānau;
  • an emphasis on knowing about, understanding and acknowledging the whakapapa and iwi connections of tamariki; and
  • valuing and respecting the competencies and understandings of tamariki and whānau.

Responsive and reciprocal relationships are effectively built by:

  • teachers’ understanding of, and connection to, local contexts, whānau and iwi histories;
  • a shared responsibility, with whānau, for the education and care of tamariki;
  • a collaborative, consultative approach to decision-making; and
  • mutual trust and confidence between whānau and staff in the centre.

Intergenerational involvement and strong whänau links between staff and tamariki contribute to the wairua of the centre.

Partnership with whānau is meaningfully enhanced through:

  • teachers’ understanding and valuing the aspirations whānau have for tamariki;
  • active encouragement for enrolment of children not currently receiving early childhood education;
  • strong support for whānau and children as they transition to school; and
  • the cultural knowledge and expertise of all staff in the centre.

Te reo Māori me ona tikanga strongly supports tamariki Māori and their whānau to engage in learning and “stand in their own mana”.

4 Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff of Tamariki Akoranga Bilingual Early Childhood Learning Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • administration;
  • health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management; and
  • financial and property management.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s documentation, including policies, procedures and records of recent use of procedures. ERO also checked elements of the following areas that have a potentially high impact on outcomes for tamariki:

  • emotional safety (including behaviour management, prevention of bullying and abuse);
  • physical safety (including behaviour management, sleeping and supervision practices; accidents and medication; hygiene and routines; travel and excursion policies and procedures);
  • staff qualifications and organisation; and
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

5 Future Action

ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

Kathleen Atkins

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

About the Centre

Type

Education and Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Centres) Regulations 1998

Number licensed for

48 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Roll number

57

Gender composition

Girls 29

Boys 28

Ethnic composition

Māori 38

New Zealand European/Pākehā 19

Review team on site

March 2011

Date of this report

10 May 2011

Previous three ERO reports

Education Review November 2007

Supplementary Review April 2004

Education Review April 2003

To the Parents and Community of Tamariki Akoranga Bilingual Early Childhood Learning Centre

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Tamariki Akoranga Bilingual Early Childhood Learning Centre.

Tamariki Akoranga provides early childhood education and care for tamariki from birth to school age. It is one branch of the Taumarunui Community Kokiri Trust (the Trust) based on whānau ora and aiming to support the education, health and social needs of the community throughout their lives. Tamariki Akoranga’s kaupapa/ philosophy is centred on te reo Māori me ona tikanga and is underpinned by the core values of the Trust and the principles of Te Whāriki. It uses Māori teaching and learning styles within traditional contexts.

Recent management support has resulted in improved systems for teaching, learning and centre operations.

Teachers work collaboratively to provide a programme strongly reflecting the bicultural values and goals of the centre. Te reo Māori me ona tikanga is soundly embedded in all aspects of the programme. Engagement in satisfying learning is fostered through access to an environment where tamariki select from a range of inviting, stimulating and varying resources and activities. They spend most of the time in child-initiated, play-based activities. The programme is underpinned by the emerging interests and curiosity of tamariki. Clear expectations for behaviour and positive guidance from teachers assist tamariki to relate well to others. Literacy and numeracy learning opportunities in te reo Māori and English are well integrated into daily activities. Tamariki learn to share, negotiate and manage conflict. They are busy and actively involved in learning.

A highly-effective programme supports older tamariki and their whānau to transition from the centre to school. It is based on ‘cultural learning’ where tamariki develop self-confidence through using their language, waiata, karakia and customs. Social and cooperative, life learning, self management and literacy and numeracy skills are also encouraged. Whānau and teachers share relevant information with schools and participate effectively to ease transitions.

Te reo Māori is used extensively in all interactions. Participation in the programme is fostered in a welcoming and inclusive environment featuring nurturing, responsive and respectful interactions between staff, whānau and tamariki. Adults show curiosity, interest and attention to tamariki, who are comfortable in their surroundings.

The identity, language and culture of tamariki Māori and their whānau are highly valued through the philosophy, programmes, interactions and actions of all people associated with the service. Intergenerational involvement and strong whnau links between staff and tamariki contribute to the wairua of the centre.ä

Partnership with whānau is meaningfully enhanced by teachers’ understanding and valuing the aspirations whānau have for tamariki, and the cultural knowledge and expertise of all staff in the centre.

Te reo Māori me ona tikanga strongly support tamariki Māori and their whānau to engage in learning and “stand in their own mana”.

Future Action

ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

When ERO has reviewed an early childhood centre we encourage management to inform their community of any follow up action they plan to take. You should talk to the management or contact person if you have any questions about this evaluation, the full ERO report or their future intentions.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the centre or see the ERO website, http://www.ero.govt.nz.

Kathleen Atkins

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT REVIEWS

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve quality of education for tamariki in early childhood centres; and
  • provide information to parents, communities and the Government.

Reviews are intended to focus on outcomes for tamariki and build on each centre’s self review.

Review Focus

ERO’s framework for reviewing and reporting is based on four review strands.

  • Quality of Education – including the quality of the programme provided for tamariki, the quality of the learning environment and the quality of the interactions between staff and tamariki and how these impact on outcomes for tamariki.
  • Additional Review Priorities – other aspects of the operation of a centre, may be included in the review. ERO will not include this strand in all reviews.
  • National Evaluation Topics – This strand contributes to the development of education policies and their effective implementation. The information from this strand is aggregated by ERO for its national evaluation reports. Topics for investigation are changed regularly to provide up-to-date information.
  • Compliance with Legal Requirements – assurance that this centre has taken all reasonable steps to meet legal requirements.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of centre performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for tamariki and useful to this centre.

Review Recommendations

Most ERO reports include recommendations for improvement. A recommendation on a particular issue does not necessarily mean that a centre is performing poorly in relation to that issue. There is no direct link between the number of recommendations in this report and the overall performance of this centre.