Te Kura o Kokohuia - 22/03/2011

1. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Kokohuia School known to the school community as Te Kura o Kokohuia is an urban composite school located in Whanganui. The kura caters for students from Years 1 to 13. Strong partnerships with whānau, hapū and iwi provide the foundation for teaching and learning. Te ao Māori is central to all learning.

A strong emphasis on transmitting the culture of tangata whenua permeates the curriculum. A desire to empower iwi, through an integral weaving of Ngā Kai o Te Puku Tupuna (Whanganui Education Plan) in the school’s curriculum is evident in practice.

Strategic direction provides a useful framework to build capability, deliver the school’s curriculum and sustain effective practice. A useful framework to consider how well the school is performing against the strategic plan, Te Inu Wai Mohio, and goals set out in the charter supports ongoing development.

The school environment effectively provides for Māori learners. Te raukura tuakana teina sets high expectations for on-task learning behaviour and positive interactions between students. Each class replicates whānau, and respectful relationships are evident throughout the kura.

Kura-a-waho provide tamariki with highly authentic learning contexts. Opportunities to learn about marae in the rohe and high expectations for students to realise their potential, contributes positively to student success. Many complete their schooling as tribal graduates.

Student achievement information in Years 1 to 8 demonstrates that they progress in numeracy and literacy. Termly reports to trustees show students make good progress towards meeting writing targets in Years 4, 5, and 7.

Moving toward providing for National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) achievement standards rather than unit standards is a positive response to students’ academic aspirations. Raising achievement at Years 9 and 10 is a priority for teachers as a foundation for success in the NCEAs. Summative data indicates this process has a positive impact on student achievement. Most make good progress. Tamariki who complete their school year experience high levels of success at all levels of the NCEAs.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

2. Kokohuia School Curriculum

How effectively does the curriculum of Kokohuia School promote student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

School context and self review

Self-review processes continue to develop. Poari matua (trustees) have in place a planned cycle of self review. The focus on strategic review includes reflection against strategic goals and the National Administration Guidelines (NAGs). A useful framework to consider how well the school is performing against the Kura Strategic Plan Te Inu Wai Mohio and goals set out in the charter supports ongoing development. The principal reports regularly to trustees about the efficient and effective day-to-day operation of the kura. Self-review processes are tailored to be responsive to unplanned issues and events.

Student achievement information in Years 1 to 8 clearly shows how well students are progressing in numeracy and literacy. Overall, students achieve comparably with school-wide and national benchmarks. Pouako (teachers) use a range of relevant assessment tools to identify students learning strengths and needs in these areas. Progress against annual achievement targets is reported to the board each term. Students are making good progress towards meeting writing targets in Years 4, 5, and 7.

Raising student achievement at Years 9 and 10 is a priority as a foundation for success in the NCEAs. Pouako monitor students’ achievement in literacy and numeracy using nationally normed assessment tools. Annual targets in these areas are set. Progress towards the targets is monitored throughout the year. Information is shared amongst pouako and used for grouping in classes. Summative data indicates that this process has a positive impact on student achievement, with most students making good progress.

The kura is moving towards providing for achievement standards rather than unit standards to respond to student’s academic aspirations. In 2009, 70% of NCEA assessments were through unit standards, in 2010 this has reduced to 50% and it is intended to further reduce this to 30% in 2011. Aspects of analysis of NCEA data, such as comparison from year to year, or with schools nationally, should be treated with caution and can only be indicative because of the small numbers of students involved. However, students who complete their school year experience high rates of success at all levels of the NCEAs.

Areas of strength

Curriculum design and review Te Tunga Ahurei articulates the Kokohuia curriculum well. It reflects the intent of the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC), Te Mārautanaga o Aotearoa, and national priorities for literacy and mathematics. Strong partnerships with whānau, hapū and iwi provide the foundation for teaching and learning. Te ao Māori is central to all learning. A strong emphasis on transmitting the culture of tangata whenua in the curriculum is evident. A desire to empower iwi, through an integral weaving throughout the school’s curriculum of Ngā Kai o Te Puku Tupuna is evident in practice.

Review of the curriculum is supported by well-expressed guiding documents. The deliberate development of curriculum delivery statements and methods of assessment deemed appropriate to Māori, are in place. Te Arapikinga ki ngā Taonga Tuku Iho provides a means for students and adults to self assess and evaluate their ability to acquire tikanga Whanganui and ‘tikanga Te Atihaunui-A-Paparangi. These with Te Wātaka Kuapapa Atua are reviewed in a three year cycle and are integral for teaching and learning.

Kura-a-waho provide tamariki with highly authentic learning contexts. Pouako planning includes students actively engaging with whānau, hapū and iwi on their marae. Opportunities to learn about marae in the rohe and high expectations for students to realise their potential, contribute positively to ngā tamariki success. Many complete their schooling as tribal graduates. Teina view their tuakana as role models and set goals for their own success at a young age.

Building capability and sustainable practice. Poari matua and whānau work collaboratively to develop innovative practice. Strategic direction is a useful framework to build capability, deliver the school’s curriculum and sustain effective practice. Clear links between the strategic and annual plans, curriculum delivery and implementation plan are evident. These contribute positively to shared understandings and collective responsibility among whānau to realise the vision and values for the kura.

Student engagement and achievement The school environment effectively provides for Māori learners and strengthens their identity. Te raukura tuakana teina sets high expectations for the behaviour of students in the school. Each class replicates whānau, and respectful relationships are evident throughout the school.

Pae mahi work collaboratively within their pou. Programme planning is consistent in both the junior and senior school. Teachers are responsible for developing programmes and timetables that reading tutors and teacher aides capably implement.

Pouako in poutahi model learning. Adults rove the classroom offering support and scaffolding the developing understandings of ngā tamariki. Students receive immediate oral feedback and feed forward.

Good coverage of curriculum areas includes specialist teachers in music and art across the school. Ng tamariki identified as requiring additional support are well catered for.ā

Students in the senior school benefit from the ratio of pourua paemahi to tamariki. Feedback and feed forward are almost immediate in the senior school. Students receive timely attention and prompt clear explanations that assist their developing ideas and understanding.

Areas for development and review

  • Self review Poari matua and pae mahi should consider ways to develop better understandings of the use of self review to raise student achievement. Supporting pouako to better analyse and use raw or aggregated data should assist them to reliably inform decision making and further improve evidencebased evaluation in the school.

  • Data, information and evidence Pouako should reflect on how to make better use of student achievement data to plan appropriate programmes to: respond to the composite nature of each class; and, adapt teaching to support next-steps learning for students in literacy and mathematics.

3. Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of Kokohuia School completed an ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • board administration;
  • curriculum;
  • management of health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management;
  • financial management; and
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO looked at the school’s documentation, including policies, procedures and records. ERO sampled recent use of procedures and ERO also checked elements of the following five areas that have a potentially high impact on students’ achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment);
  • physical safety of students;
  • teacher registration;
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions; and
  • attendance.

During the course of the review ERO identified an area of non-compliance. In order to address this, the board of trustees must:

  1. After consultation with the school community, adopt a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum. [Section 60B Education Act]

4. Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Kathleen Atkins

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

22 March 2011

About The School

School type

Composite (Years 1 – 13)

School roll

79

Gender composition

Female 44,

Male 35

Ethnic composition

Māori 79

Special features

Immersion classes, Years 1 - 8 Bi-lingual classes, Years 9 - 13

Review team on site

November/December 2010

Date of this report

22 March 2011

Previous three ERO reports

Supplementary Review January 2008

Supplementary Review March 2005

Special Review March 2004

To the Parents and Community of Kokohuia School

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Kokohuia School.

Kokohuia School known to the school community as Te Kura o Kokohuia is an urban composite school located in Whanganui. The kura caters for students from Years 1 to 13. Strong partnerships with whānau, hapū and iwi provide the foundation for teaching and learning. Te ao Māori is central to all learning.

A strong emphasis on transmitting the culture of tangata whenua permeates the curriculum. A desire to empower iwi, through an integral weaving of Ngā Kai o Te Puku Tupuna (Whanganui Education Plan) in the school’s curriculum is evident in practice.

Strategic direction provides a useful framework to build capability, deliver the school’s curriculum and sustain effective practice. A useful framework to consider how well the school is performing against the strategic plan, Te Inu Wai Mohio, and goals set out in the charter supports ongoing development.

The school environment effectively provides for Māori learners. Te raukura tuakana teina sets high expectations for on-task learning behaviour and positive interactions between students. Each class replicates whānau, and respectful relationships are evident throughout the kura.

Kura-a-waho provide tamariki with highly authentic learning contexts. Opportunities to learn about marae in the rohe and high expectations for students to realise their potential, contributes positively to student success. Many complete their schooling as tribal graduates.

Student achievement information in Years 1 to 8 demonstrates that they progress in numeracy and literacy. Termly reports to trustees show students make good progress towards meeting writing targets in Years 4, 5, and 7.

Moving toward providing for National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) achievement standards rather than unit standards is a positive response to students’ academic aspirations. Raising achievement at Years 9 and 10 is a priority for teachers as a foundation for success in the NCEAs. Summative data indicates this process has a positive impact on student achievement. Most make good progress. Tamariki who complete their school year experience high levels of success at all levels of the NCEAs.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Review Coverage

This report provides an evaluation of how effectively the school’s curriculum promotes student learning - engagement, progress and achievement. ERO’s evaluation takes account of the school’s previous reporting history and is based on:

  • what is known about student achievement information, including the achievement of Māori and Pacific students;
  • decisions made to improve student achievement using assessment and selfreview information; and
  • teaching strategies and programmes implemented to give effect to the school’s curriculum.

ERO also gathers information during the review to contribute to its national reports. The national reports are published on ERO’s website.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the school or see the ERO website, www.ero.govt.nz.

Kathleen Atkins

National Manager Review Services

Central Region