Waiuku College - 01/11/2017

Summary

Waiuku College is a co-educational secondary school located in Waiuku, catering for students from Years 9 to 13. At the time of this ERO review there were 801 students enrolled, 182 of whom identify as Māori, and 19 international students.

A positive, student-centred tone contributes to the strong sense of belonging and pride that reflects the Waiuku Way. Students are empowered to accept responsibility, support their peers and actively participate in learning.

Students engage successfully in a range of cultural and sporting activities, both within school and as part of the community. Student leadership opportunities are widely promoted and supported.

Waiuku College has participated in the Kia Eke Panuku initiative in 2015 and 2016. In 2017, leaders and teachers are engaging in externally provided professional learning about culturally responsive practice and teaching as inquiry.

The school has a good reporting history with ERO and has responded positively to the findings of the 2014 ERO review.

The school is an active member of the Waiuku Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds well to Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Clear strategic direction supported by a well-considered change-management approach is improving equity and excellence schoolwide.

The school has identified embedding culturally responsive pedagogy, extending the effective use of data, and implementing the enhanced appraisal process as priority areas for development to achieve equity and excellence.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improve teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds well to Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Overall, students are achieving well in the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA). The 2016 roll-based data shows that the proportion of students who achieved Levels 1, 2, and 3 were above national averages. Levels of disparity have remained overtime between Māori learners and their peers.

School leaver’s data shows that the proportion of Māori learners leaving school with at least NCEA Level 2 shows significant improvement overtime and is comparable with their peers. The school provides a range of learning programmes to support meaningful pathways beyond school. A newly developed analysis tool is enabling further information to be gathered about leavers’ destinations. This should better support a responsive curriculum to continue to improve learner outcomes.

A wide range of information is collected, collated and analysed for students in Year 9 and 10. Data is used well to identify students’ levels of learning and achievement ability. Teachers regularly discuss students’ learning needs to design meaningful programmes that support engagement. This is fostering higher levels of collaboration to identify effective strategies that support those learners who require acceleration.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Clear strategic direction supported by a well-considered change-management approach is improving equity and excellence schoolwide.

The board is strongly focussed on improvement and positive outcomes for learners. Trustees are well informed through a wide range of information about student achievement and wellbeing. They seek and participate in professional learning opportunities to build their understanding of their roles and responsibilities. Trustees actively support and contribute well to improving the strategic direction of the school.

Leaders are resolute in promoting and achieving equity and excellence for all learners. The improvement-focused leadership team regularly engages in professional learning to extend effective leadership knowledge and practice. Purposeful appointments have strengthened leadership capability and capacity. Opportunities for leadership development are fostered, explored and promoted schoolwide. Raising students’ learning and wellbeing outcomes are at the forefront of strategic planning and ongoing improvement.

The authentic use of te reo and tikanga Māori throughout the school is increasingly evident. Strengthening partnerships with Ngāti Te Ata is deepening understanding of the local history and environment and enriching the curriculum. A strategic, well-considered plan is in place to build culturally responsive practice, further supporting the raising of Māori achievement.

Learners with additional needs are well supported. An inclusive approach to involving parents and whanau as partners in their children’s learning is highly evident. A well-considered transition process for learners into the school promotes a strong sense of belonging and confidence in their new environment. A flexible approach to supporting students ensures they experience personalised learning programmes that best meet their needs and aspirations.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further development is needed in processes to:

  • develop a school-wide understanding of culturally responsive practice to ensure a more consistent approach

  • extend the use and understanding of data to inform teaching and learning programmes to better respond to students’ needs.

The school has recently reviewed and refined the appraisal process to focus on enhancing leadership and teacher practice. Trustees and leaders need to ensure this new process is well understood by all staff and is fully embedded.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were 19 international students attending the school, including one exchange student.

Students are well supported to participate, learn and thrive in the life of the school community. Highly-effective systems and practices are in place to encourage them to maximise the opportunities offered and engage in the wide range of rich learning and cultural experiences available.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improve teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

1 November 2017

About the school

Location

Waiuku

Ministry of Education profile number

105

School type

Co-educational Secondary School (Year 9-15)

School roll

801

Gender composition

Girls 53% Boys 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori 23%
Pākehā 61%
Other 16%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

1 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review October 2014
Education Review August 2011
Supplementary Review May 2009