Warrington School - 24/05/2017

Summary

The school has a roll of 38 children, 9 of whom are Māori. There is 1 Pacific child and 3 children of other ethnicities.

Since the last ERO evaluation, the school has made good progress in some of the areas identified for development. There is still a significant amount of work for school leaders to complete in relation to monitoring progress and analysing data to determine how effective learning support has been in raising achievement. Internal evaluation remains an area for further development.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is not able to clearly identify how well it is achieving equitable outcomes for all children.

Although the school has several well-established processes that support equitable outcomes, leaders and teachers need to complete further work on processes to ensure that children are appropriately challenged and supported in their learning. Individualised planning to support learners whose progress requires accelerating need to be more detailed. Internal evaluation needs to be embedded.

At the time of this review children were benefiting from a strong culture of care and a strongly localised curriculum.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other children remains. Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child
  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement
  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school does not know how effectively it responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The school was not monitoring whether progress was sufficient, or identifying effective strategies and interventions that accelerate progress.

The school’s National Standards (NS) data for the period 2014 to 2016 indicates that most students are achieving well in reading, writing and mathematics. The 2016 end of year data indicates that most Māori children are achieving at or above NS for reading, writing and mathematics. The writing programme is not serving some boys well.

Assessment practices and procedures for the way teachers make judgements about how well children achieve need significant improvement. Processes to ensure consistency of judgement are not documented and there are no guidelines to support teachers in making judgements about children’s achievement and progress. Assessments are not a balance of standardised, curriculum-based assessments and teacher observations. There is an over-reliance on standardised assessments.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has some processes in place which are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence.

The curriculum is rich, responsive and authentic to the children’s lives. Leaders and teachers actively involve parents, whānau and the community in the everyday life of the school.

Teachers and leaders have established a strong culture of care and relational trust. Relationships of care and connectedness are evident throughout the school.

There are some effective governance and leadership practices in place. The principal and trustees seek the perspectives and aspirations of students, parents and whānau, and incorporate them into the school’s vision, values, goals and targets.

Well-considered strategic planning processes effectively support equity and excellence. There is clear alignment between the strategic key plans and systems. School priorities and targets link through to classroom programmes and to teachers’ appraisal goals.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

There are several processes which are either not in place or require further development.

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Achievement data is not analysed in a way that allows judgements to be made about the sufficiency of children’s progress. Analysing rates of progress will support the board, leaders and teachers in making better decisions about how effective teaching is supporting equitable outcomes for all.

Assessment procedures and practices for making judgements about how well children are progressing and achieving are not robust. More rigorous procedures for assessment and teachers’ judgements will give the board and community assurance that judgements are reliable and can withstand scrutiny.

Individual plans for children who need extra help with learning do not give enough detail or a sense of urgency. Plans that clearly identify teaching strategies and monitoring will help teachers be more targeted in their teaching.

Internal evaluation processes are not sufficiently robust. Better internal evaluation will support the board, leaders and teachers to judge how well decisions, resourcing, and actions to support learning are working.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other children remains.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Recommendations

ERO recommends that the school seek further support from their Ministry of Education adviser in order to bring about sustainable improvements in moderation processes and practices. This will ensure that children, teachers, leaders and the board are confident in the reliability of progress and achievement information in relation to NS and NZC expectations.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

24 May 2017

About the school 

Location

Warrington

Ministry of Education profile number

3862

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

37

Gender composition

Boys: 21

Girls: 16

Ethnic composition

Māori: 11

Pākehā: 22

Pacific: 1

Other: 3

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2017

Date of this report

24 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review: February 2014

Education Review: February 2011

Education Review: November 2007