Results for "ece"

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  1. Appendix 1: Approved ITE providers 2016

     Appendix 1: Approved ITE providers 2016 ITE Provider Sector Current qualifications   Te Pū Wānanga o Anamata Primary Bachelor Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Primary Bachelor The University of Auckland   ECE   Bachelor Graduate Diploma Primary   Bachelor Graduate Diploma Master's Secondary Bachelor of Physical Education Graduate Diploma Postgraduate Diploma (Field based) Master's Auckland University of Technology              ECE ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/newly-graduated-teachers-preparation-and-confidence-to-teach/appendix-1-approved-ite-providers-2016/

  2. Participation in early childhood education

    In each primary school ERO asked what the school knew about Pacific students’ early childhood education (ECE) attendance. Fourteen percent of the 173 primary schools said that all their Pacific students had attended ECE. In a further 30 percent of schools most Pacific students had participated in ECE, and 18 percent of schools reported that some had. In three schools no Pacific students had attended ECE. There was no information about this in the remaining 32 percent of primary schools....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/promoting-pacific-student-achievement/participation-in-early-childhood-education/

  3. Overview

    Supporting vulnerable children is one of the Government’s priorities within Better Public Services (BPS). As part of the BPS goal, a Government priority for education is that every child has the opportunity to participate in quality early childhood education (ECE). This significantly increases a child’s chance of future educational success, particularly for children from vulnerable families. The Government has a target that in 2016, 98 percent of children starting school will have participat...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-early-childhood-services/overview/

  4. Introduction

    Equity Funding was introduced in March 2002 with a budget of $8.5 million. The objectives are to: reduce educational disparities between different groups in New Zealand reduce barriers to participation faced by under-represented groups in early childhood services support services to raise levels of educational achievement for these children. Equity Funding is ‘tagged’ and identifiable as an amount additional to a service’s ECE Funding Subsidy and 20 Hours ECE. It must be spent with the equ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-early-childhood-services/introduction/

  5. Next Steps

    ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education considers the findings of this report to: inform decisions about Equity Funding in its current review of ECE funding identify ways to increase early childhood services’ awareness of the expectations for use and requirements for reporting by early childhood services that receive Equity Funding. ERO recommends that early childhood services use the findings of this report to discuss and evaluate their use of Equity Funding....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-early-childhood-services/next-steps/

  6. How ERO approaches health and safety during reviews in ECE

    As part of each review, services attest that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet legal requirements. Self-Audit Checklists cover key requirements in four areas: Curriculum, Premises and Facilities, Health and Safety Practices, and Governance, Management and Administration.ERO looks in more depth at the service’s systems for managing areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing: motional safety physical safety suitable suitability of staffing evacuation procedures...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/meeting-requirements-for-childrens-safety-and-wellbeing-in-ece/how-ero-approaches-health-and-safety-during-reviews-in-ece/

  7. Introduction

    This report highlights how early childhood services keep up to date with changing regulations and legal requirements in order to effectively manage for children’s safety and wellbeing.Service owners/leaders may find this report useful when considering how to effectively and proactively stay informed about regulations and requirements. This report illustrates the various ways services ensure staff practices meet new regulations, and shares the resources they use to stay up to date.ERO investiga...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/meeting-requirements-for-childrens-safety-and-wellbeing-in-ece/introduction/

  8. Next steps

    ERO recommends that early childhood services: work in partnership with whānau to ensure programmes appropriately promote children’s language, culture and identity use the report’s findings self- review questions and Best Practice Indicators to review the quality of their partnerships with whānau identify and respond to the professional development educators require to improve partnerships with whānau. ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education identify ways to: develop professional l...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/partnership-with-whanau-maori-in-early-childhood-services/next-steps/

  9. Introduction

    BackgroundThe early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki,has its development embedded in the post education reform period of the early 1990s. Its development spanned a period from 1991 to 1996. Extensive consultation with diverse groups in the early childhood education (ECE) sector led to a draft document, Te Whāriki: Draft guidelines for developmentally appropriate programmes in early childhood services [5] being published in 1993. The final curriculum document, Te Whāriki, He Whāriki Mātauran...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-te-whariki/introduction/

  10. Metholdology

    ERO evaluated how ECE services work in partnership with whānau of Māori children in 374 early childhood services. The sample was representative of the national profile of service types.[15] The data was gathered during each service’s regular education review in Term 4, 2010 and Term 1, 2011.ERO’s framework for this evaluationThe evaluation focussed on three questions: To what extent does the service understand and value the identity, language and culture of Māori children and their whāna...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/partnership-with-whanau-maori-in-early-childhood-services/metholdolgy/

  11. Northern Region - Te Tai Raki

    Scheduled Reviews for Term 1 2020Includes schools and early childhood services for the Far North and Auckland region. Updated February 2020ECE ACG Strathallan Preschool Centre Active Explorers Blockhouse Bay Adventure Valley Childcare Agape Community early Learning Centre Akoteu To'o Lelei Amanda's HomeBased ECE 3 Aranui Montessori Preschool Aro Arataki Children's Centre Arohanui Early Childhood Learning Centre Aspire Learning Home Based Childcare AUT Early Childhood Centre BestStart Apirana Be...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/forthcoming-reviews/northern-region-te-tai-raki/

  12. Improvement focused journey for one Pacific service

    The example below highlights how the leaders of one service managed the changes to improve learning outcomes for the Pacific children in their service.ContextThis centre is governed by a management committee that includes church members, staff and parent representatives. ERO’s previous supplementary reviews in 2009 and 2010 identified areas for improvement in aspects of management processes and the quality of the programme. During this period, the centre also had a number of staff changes. ERO...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/how-do-leaders-support-improvement-in-pacific-early-childhood-services/improvement-focused-journey-for-one-pacific-service/

  13. Conclusion

    Effective employment practices aim to develop, strengthen and make the best use of staff skills and knowledge to enhance teaching practice and maximise the safety and learning for all children. The quality of the early childhood education workforce, in particular staff performance, impacts on the extent to which services have the capacity to promote positive learning outcomes for all children.ERO found that many services had a good working knowledge of employment policies and procedures and used...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/improving-quality-employment-responsibilities-in-kindergartens-and-education-and-care-services/conclusion/

  14. Appendix 3: References

    Alvestad, M., Duncan, J. and Berge, A. (2009). New Zealand ECE teachers talk about Te Whāriki. New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work, Volume 6, (1): 3-19. Cullen, J. (1996). The challenge of Te Whāriki for future developments in early childhood education. Delta, 48 (1): 113-125. Dalli, C. (2011). A curriculum of open possibilities: a New Zealand kindergarten teacher’s view of professional practice. Early Years 31 (3): 229-243. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/095...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-te-whariki/appendix-3-references/

  15. Effective leadership for improvement

    ERO found that strong relationships and a sense of stewardship were the cornerstones of the improvements made by the leaders. Leaders understood their responsibility for managing the resources allocated for the children’s education. They knew that they had to be accountable and were courageous in talking about these improvements with children’s parents and families, the local Pacific community, and relevant government agencies. They also knew that they could not do it alone and used extern...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/how-do-leaders-support-improvement-in-pacific-early-childhood-services/effective-leadership-for-improvement/

  16. Conclusion - part one

    Strong learning foundations and a sense of identity and belonging can contribute to transition being a successful experience. Successful transition from early childhood education to school can help maintain continuity of learning. ERO found that the most effective practices supporting children as they approach transition to school included: a responsive and holistic curriculum focused on dispositional learning, independence and social competence as outlined in Te Whāriki assessment information...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/continuity-of-learning-transitions-from-early-childhood-services-to-schools/conclusion-part-one/

  17. Appendix 4: Prescribed Curriculum Framework

    Clauses 1-5 of this Gazette Notice published in September 2008 signalling the requirement to implement the Early Childhood Education Framework are set out below.Education (Early Childhood Education Curriculum Framework) Notice 2008[22]Pursuant to section 314 of the Education Act 1989 (as amended by the Education Amendment Act 2006), the Minister of Education gives the following notice:Notice Title and commencement – (1) This notice may be cited as the Education (Early Childhood Education Curr...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-te-whariki/appendix-4-prescribed-curriculum-framework/

  18. Introduction

    The Government’s education sector goal is to have a world leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century. One of the education priorities to achieve this goal focuses on increasing opportunities for children to participate in high quality early childhood education. Early childhood services that provide high quality education and care are effective in supporting children’s developing social competence...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/positive-foundations-for-learning-confident-and-competent-children-in-early-childhood-services/introduction/

  19. Background

    The importance of early mathematicsChildren's early experiences of mathematics form the foundation for their future mathematics learning and success. Mathematics enables children to think logically, strategically, creatively and critically. Mathematical knowledge and skills provide building blocks for success in many areas of life and work.1New Zealand and international research on children's learning in the early years confirms the importance of early experiences in mathematics for future educa...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/early-mathematics-a-guide-for-improving-teaching-and-learning/background/

  20. Overview and next steps

    Overview and next stepsGood quality early childhood education and care for infants and toddlers has lasting benefits for children and their parents and whanau. 1 This time is a critical and fundamental period of development for children as it lays the foundations for lifelong learning. The communication and exploration strands of Te Whāriki, the Ministry of Education’s curriculum for early childhood, are crucial to these foundations. 2The number of infants and toddlers participating in earl...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/infants-and-toddlers-competent-and-confident-communicators-and-explorers/overview-and-next-steps/