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  1. Executive Summary

    What did we find overall?Evaluation insights by the Education Review Office (ERO), alongside contributions from the Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust (Te Kōhanga Reo Trust) and kōhanga reo whānau, inform our overall findings which: create the conceptual framing that underpins success in kōhanga reo clarify the exemplary outcomes for children and affirm the positive influence of whānau values, beliefs and practices in kōhanga reo acknowledge how whānau positively influence success highlight t...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/unearth-our-ancestral-treasures-so-that-we-may-prosper-2018/executive-summary/

  2. Findings

    This section includes ERO's findings from fieldwork in Terms 1 and 2, 2016 and then Term 4, 2016. Findings from Terms 1 and 2, 2016 Student selection During Terms 1 and 2, 2016, ERO asked schools about the basis on which students were nominated and selected to become participants in Year 9 Plus. This was to determine: the criteria schools used to calculate the degree of risk to later learning what schools thought about the nomination and selection process whether the process could be improved....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/year-9-plus-2016-the-first-year-year-9/findings/

  3. Good Practice Narratives

    ERO visited ten schools that had been identified by external stakeholders as having good practice in sexuality education, and/or doing a good job of including sex-, gender- and sexuality-diverse students. 1.   Culturally responsive sexuality education                                                                 2.   Drawing on student voice                                                                             ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/promoting-wellbeing-through-sexuality-education/good-practice-narratives/

  4. Findings

    Engagement with schools: what parents and whānau told EROThis evaluation sought to find out about home-school engagement from the perspective of parents. ERO asked parents and whānau for their views in order to understand their expectations of schools, what made engagement work well, what made it difficult, and what schools could do to improve. The findings are organised under the following groups of parents: Māori parents and whānau; Pacific parents; refugee and migrant parents; parents of...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/partners-in-learning-parents-voices/findings/

  5. Findings

    ERO has identified three key interrelated issues that need to be addressed to significantly lift the achievement of students, particularly for priority learners. These broadly relate to how well schools are focussing on providing education that addresses the needs of students.The fact that the issues are: apparent in both primary and secondary schools; involve many learning areas and contexts; and have been identified in a range of national evaluations, means we simply cannot ignore them. In add...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/evaluation-at-a-glance-priority-learners-in-new-zealand-schools/findings/

  6. Findings

    From 2011 to 2014Since the inception of secondary-tertiary partnerships (STPs) in 2011, there has been significant progress in establishing a programme that is clearly meeting the needs of a large number of students.In 2011, students, teachers and tutors talked about students going from school ‘to the Trades Academy’. The term ‘Trades Academy’ became synonymous with going to the tertiary education organisation (TEO). The ‘Trades Academy’ was viewed as a separate add-on to the school...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/secondary-tertiary-programmes-trades-academies-what-works-and-next-steps/findings/

  7. Findings

    ERO found that leaders of the 12 schools we visited were all continually looking for ways to improve outcomes for their students and to make learning relevant for the future. They were striving to develop students who were both academically successful, in relation to New Zealand education standards and qualifications, as well as confident, connected and actively involved learners. Fullan’s ‘right drivers’ were clearly in evidence in the effective schools that we visited.Schools meeting the...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/leading-innovative-learning-in-new-zealand-schools-april-2018/findings/

  8. Māori to English W

    A E I O U H K M N P R T W NG WH W wā (i ētahi wā kua kōwhiri noa iho): choose (often) wā (i ngā wā ake nei): any time, on any occasion wā (i te wā e tika ana): appropriate (where appropriate) wā (i te wā huinga): during the session wā (mō tēnei wā): interim wā (ngā wā āhuatanga ohorere): emergency (times of emergency) wā (te wā kei reira rātou): attendance period wā ako: session wā kikī: full time (work) wā ohorere: emergency wā ohoreretang...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-kupu-arotake-list-of-maori-english-education-term/maori-to-english-a/maori-to-english-w/

  9. Successful engagement: good practice

    This section discusses the practices in each of the eight schools that supported successful engagement with parents, whānau and the wider community.Aranui School: Responsive relationshipsAranui School is a decile 1, Year 1 to 6 contributing school in Wanganui. In 2007 the school’s roll was 118, of whom 58 percent were Māori, 41 percent were New Zealand European/Pākehā and one percent were Pacific students.The principal knows the school’s community well, having been in this role for some...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/partners-in-learning-good-practice/successful-engagement-good-practice/

  10. What ERO found

    Awareness and confidenceERO’s findings show a high level of awareness of, and growing confidence among leaders and kaiako in working with, Te Whāriki. Leaders and kaiako like the simplicity, layout and user‑friendly language of the updated curriculum.Leaders and kaiako in all of the early learning services reported they were aware of the updated Te Whāriki, with just over half reporting they were already considering how to use the curriculum document. Attendance at, and engagement with,...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/awareness-and-confidence-to-work-with-te-whariki-2017/what-ero-found/

  11. Oral language learning and development: birth to eight years of age

    ERO’s findings, particularly in relation to what well-focused early learning services and schools were doing to support children’s oral language learning and development, are described in this next section. The findings are presented in a way that shows a learner pathway from infancy through to eight years of age. They include some broad expectations for oral language learning and development for each group of learners, as well as examples of practice from the well-focused services and scho...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/extending-their-language-expanding-their-world/oral-language-learning-and-development-birth-to-eight-years-of-age/

  12. Part 6: ERO's evaluation indicators for education reviews in hospital-based education and care services

    Introduction ERO’s evaluation indicators are about the factors that contribute to children’s learning and promote their wellbeing in hospital-based services. The evaluation indicators: help to determine if high quality is being achieved are indicative of quality – they do not represent quality practice on their own are statements that can be verified through data collection and analysis. They are not requirements and hospital-based services are not expected to demonstrate that they have...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-methodology-for-ero-reviews-in-hospital-based-education-and-care-services/part-6-eros-evaluation-indicators-for-education-reviews-in-hospital-based-education-and-care-services/

  13. PART 6: ERO’s Evaluation Indicators for Education Reviews in Early Childhood Services

    Indicators are statements that indicate whether a goal has been achieved. In this document, ERO’s evaluation indicators are about the factors in an early childhood service that contribute to positive learning outcomes for children.The indicators provide a framework that allow for judgements to be made about what is being practised and the difference between what is enacted and high quality practice.ERO’s evaluation indicators for early childhood services: help to determine if high quality is...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-early-childhood-services/part-6-eros-evaluation-indicators-for-education-reviews-in-early-childhood-services/

  14. Part 6: ERO's evaluation indicators for education reviews in home-based education and care services

    IntroductionIndicators are statements that indicate whether a goal has been achieved. In this document, ERO’s evaluation indicators are about the factors in a home-based service that contribute to positive learning outcomes for children. The indicators provide a framework that allow for judgements to be made about what is being practised and the difference between what is enacted and high quality practice.ERO’s evaluation indicators for home-based services: help to determine if high quality...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-home-based-education-and-care-services/part-6eros-evaluation-indicators-for-education-reviews-in-home-based-education-and-care-services/

  15. Findings

    The above are eight examples of schools working well with the National Standards. All of these schools took a positive approach to the standards, started developing their understanding and implementation of the standards early, and built this implementation on good assessment practices. Direct quotes from trustees, school leaders, teachers and students are included in italics.School AContextSchool A is a medium-sized school with students in Years 1 to 8. At the time of the ERO review, a fifth of...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-national-standards-good-practice/findings/

  16. High quality education and care - an overview

    ERO has found that in good quality early childhood services, managers and educators hold high expectations for all children and keep their focus on what really matters. In these services, educators are interested in children - who they are and what they bring to their learning. Educators’ interactions with children create opportunities for meaningful conversations that provoke and extend children’s thinking. Assessment practice enables educators to notice, recognise and respond to children...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/quality-in-early-childhood-services/high-quality-education-and-care-an-overview/

  17. Transition from Primary to Secondary School

    Students’ wellbeing and learning must be maintained as they transition from primary to secondary schools. A student’s transition can be complicated by the social, emotional and physiological changes that can negatively impact on their learning. Teachers that understand how these changes impact on their students are better placed to help students make positive adjustments to their new school. This section shares research that explains transitions.Understanding education transitionsWhat are ed...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/evaluation-at-a-glance-transitions-from-primary-to-secondary-school/6-transition-from-primary-to-secondary-school/