Results for "diversity"

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  1. Enhancing ERO’s internal capability and capacity

    Review of ERO’s operating modelIn December 2017, ERO undertook a review of its operating model with a view to determining the best way to improve: the value we add for schools and early learning services the quality and timeliness of our reporting and consistency of our work the effectiveness of our evaluation process in the long term our ability to be agile in the way we operate our responsiveness to our stakeholders and contribution to their confidence in the system. The review included...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/annual-report-20172018/enhancing-eros-internal-capability-and-capacity/

  2. How is Auckland responding to increasing diversity?

    Taking advantage of ERO’s regular cycle of reviews, the evaluation investigated how a group of early learning services (74) and schools (38) in Auckland responded to increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in their learning community. ERO key findingsMost of the services and schools knew who their learners were, and to some extent, had taken steps to respond to the learners’ language and culture. These services and schools had: acknowledged the learners’ home languages developed rela...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/how-is-auckland-responding-to-increasing-diversity/

  3. ERO’s internal capability and capacity

    The year has been spent implementing ERO’s new operating model to amplify its benefits across the organisation. Strengthening Evaluation and Professional Practice ERO has strengthened the infrastructure that supports evaluation methodology and professional practice. The newly established Methodology and Professional Practice Team leads and supports the development continuum for external evaluation, from ERO’s frameworks and approaches (what we do) to the quality and effectiveness of our eva...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/annual-report-201819/eros-internal-capability-and-capacity/

  4. Conclusion

    The schools in this evaluation were at various stages in their provision. Many had established a shared understanding of gifted and talented education (GATE), and had implemented programmes that were beneficial to gifted and talented students. A few schools were just beginning to make special provision for gifted and talented students.School leaders were enthusiastic about supporting the achievement of gifted and talented students in just over half the schools. This foundation was beneficial to...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-gifted-and-talented-students/conclusion/

  5. Conclusion

    ERO’s reports of 2011 and 2012 indicate similar pictures of the enactment of the curriculum principles into schools’ and classrooms’ curricula. It is clear that in some schools, leaders and teachers have not considered the curriculum principles to be a high priority in curriculum review and design. In many schools the initial response to curriculum review had been to develop the school’s expectations for individual curriculum areas. Many of these schools were still in the early stages...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/the-new-zealand-curriculum-principles-foundations-for-curriculum-decision-making/conclusion/

  6. Findings

    The findingsThe curriculum principles are expected to be the foundation of curriculum decision-making at each school. They are intended to be used for planning, prioritising and reviewing the school’s curriculum. When they are used well the principles put students at the centre of teaching and learning by fostering the design of a curriculum that engages and challenges them.There continued to be considerable variability in the extent that the curriculum principles were evident in the schools r...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/the-new-zealand-curriculum-principles-foundations-for-curriculum-decision-making/findings/

  7. Foreword

    The Education Review Office (ERO) is an independent government department that reviews the performance of New Zealand’s schools and early childhood services, and reports publicly on what it finds.The whakataukī of ERO demonstrates the importance we place on the educational achievement of our children and young people:Ko te Tamaiti te Pūtake o te KaupapaThe Child – the Heart of the MatterIn our daily work we have the privilege of going into early childhood services and schools, giving us a...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-international-students/foreword/

  8. Recommendations

    ERO recommends that teachers: communicate, consult, and collaborate with parents, whānau, and the school community to develop a shared understanding of gifted and talented education; provide challenging and differentiated programmes for gifted and talented students in the regular classroom; provide appropriate feedback and support for gifted and talented students to achieve in and make progress with their gifts or talents; develop an understanding that every teacher has responsibility to teach...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-gifted-and-talented-students/recommendations/

  9. Equity and excellence in student outcomes

    The number one challenge facing the New Zealand education system is to achieve equity and excellence in student outcomes. Our school system is characterised by increasing diversity of students and persistent disparities in achievement. Although many young people achieve at the highest levels in core areas such as reading, mathematics and science, the system serves some students less well. Young people attending the same school can experience widely divergent opportunities to learn. This within-...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/equity-and-excellence-in-student-outcomes/

  10. Te Aho Matua Indicators

    Wāhanga The diagrams on the following pages show the inter-relationships between the Te Aho Matua wāhanga. Te Tino Uaratanga in this document is the section of Te Aho Matua that sets out the English interpretation of the long term outcomes for students. The visual representation, using colour, denotes how each of the other five wāhanga links to Te Tino Uaratanga. Depicting the wāhanga in this way shows the clear links between the indicators and the long-term outcomes defined in Te Tino Uar...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/evaluation-indicators-for-education-reviews-in-te-aho-matua-kura-kaupapa-maori/te-aho-matua-indicators/

  11. Responding to linguistically diverse learners

    Most people in the world speak two or more languages. Although New Zealand has three official languages, including New Zealand Sign Language, many children do not have the opportunity to develop competency in more than one language.Two or more languages are learned relatively easily in the first three years of life, which is a sensitive period for language learning. Babies are born with the innate ability to recognise every sound in any language, but this ability declines after about the age of...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/extending-their-language-expanding-their-world/responding-to-linguistically-diverse-learners/

  12. Glossary D

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D Word Definition Related terms Dashboard In information technology, a dashboard is similar to a car's dashboard, as it organises and presents information in a diagramatic way that is easy to read. A computer dashboard may be interactive. Interactive Data Information that has been turned into a form that is more convenient to move or process. For a class, the data could include assessment records, attendance informat...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/modern-new-zealand-learning-practice-glossary/glossary-a-z/glossary-d/

  13. Methodology

    ERO reviewed 15 of New Zealand’s 24 Secondary-Tertiary Programmes (STPs, also known as ‘Trades Academies’). The Ministry of Education and ERO selected these as representative of the different models of operation and diversity within the models. ERO visited nine mixed model providers (five TEO-led and four school-led), three single school model providers, one national provider and two STP Pilots. In total these 15 STPs provided opportunities for 75 percent of all the students enrolled in...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/secondary-tertiary-programmes-trades-academies-what-works-and-next-steps/methodology/

  14. Next steps

    ERO has recommendations for school leaders, teachers and the Ministry of Education to make the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum and teaching as inquiry a useful and integral part of everyday teaching practice in New Zealand classrooms.ERO recommends that school leaders and teachers: review the extent to which each principle of The New Zealand Curriculum, and the elements inherent in them, are represented in their policies and plans and in the curriculum that is enacted in classrooms read...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/directions-for-learning-the-new-zealand-curriculum-principles-and-teaching-as-inquiry/next-steps/

  15. Part 2: Outcomes for children in early childhood education

    IntroductionAll licensed early childhood services are required to meet regulated standards, employ qualified teachers or meet other qualification requirements, and implement a bicultural curriculum. While unified at a policy level, the early childhood education sector in Aotearoa New Zealand is diverse.This diversity includes: different cultural perspectives structural differences (sessions or full day programmes) organisational differences (kindergartens or education and care services) differen...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-home-based-education-and-care-services/part-2-outcomes-for-children-in-early-childhood-education/

  16. Introduction

    Early childhood education has evolved to meet the needs of the diversity of New Zealand’s children, parents, whānau, and communities. In line with this, the many different types of early childhood services display: structural differences, such as sessional or all-day programmes; different ownership and organisational arrangements - services may be run by private individuals, government organisations, cooperatives, or trusts; different learning environments such as home‑based or centre-based...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/the-quality-of-assessment-in-early-childhood-education/introduction/

  17. National evaluations - what's new and coming soon....

    Coming soon...Activity Centres cater for secondary school students (Years 9 - 13) who are at risk of disengaging from mainstream schooling and at risk of low educational, social and vocational outcomes. ERO evaluated all 14 Activity Centres to assess how effective they were in promoting positive outcomes for students. The findings will be published in a report out later this year.Keeping children engaged and achieving through rich curriculum inquiries is the latest in a series of reports by ERO...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/news/ero-insights-july-2018/national-evaluations-whats-new-and-coming-soon/

  18. Introduction

    The period of schooling commonly referred to as the middle years (Years 7 to 10) can be particularly challenging for many students. Firstly, it is in these years that many students face the increased social, emotional and physiological changes of adolescence. Secondly, the period coincides with many students moving from primary to secondary school. While students report that moving to secondary school is something they are looking forward to (Kennedy & Cox, 2008), the primary to secondary...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/evaluation-at-a-glance-transitions-from-primary-to-secondary-school/introduction/

  19. Introduction

    Pacific student achievement 2009 and 2010All students have the right to a high quality education regardless of their cultural, linguistic or socio-economic backgrounds. Students with varying identities, language, backgrounds, abilities and talents need to be recognised and affirmed and have their learning needs addressed in an inclusive school environment. (ERO’s Evaluation Indicators for School Reviews 2011: The diversity of students and their education). [2]ERO is committed to building sch...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/improving-education-outcomes-for-pacific-learners/introduction/

  20. Part 2: Children's learning and wellbeing in hospital-based services

    Context of hospital-based servicesHospital-based early childhood education and care services operate from hospital premises and provide education and care to children who are patients of that hospital. Aotearoa New Zealand is the only country internationally to have an education curriculum in hospital settings.3The hospital play specialists’ profession is a niche field, emerging in New Zealand as a professional practice in the 1960s.4 Hospital play specialists (HPS) work as members of interdis...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-methodology-for-ero-reviews-in-hospital-based-education-and-care-services/part-2-childrens-learning-and-wellbeing-in-hospital-based-services/