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  1. How is Auckland responding to increasing diversity?

    Taking advantage of ERO’s regular cycle of reviews, the evaluation investigated how a group of early learning services (74) and schools (38) in Auckland responded to increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in their learning community. ERO key findingsMost of the services and schools knew who their learners were, and to some extent, had taken steps to respond to the learners’ language and culture. These services and schools had: acknowledged the learners’ home languages developed rela...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/how-is-auckland-responding-to-increasing-diversity/

  2. Effective practices: what works in different settings

    Learners should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.For the final section, ERO visited and talked with the leaders, teachers and learners of the selected services and schools. They all celebrated diversity and saw it as an opportunity for everyone to learn. By investigating effective practice in these settings ERO wanted to find out: how these leaders and teachers got to know their learners how l...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/effective-practices-what-works-in-different-settings/

  3. Findings

    The information for this evaluation was gathered during regular ERO reviews of 93 schools. All these schools were signatories to the Code. The findings are not separated into primary and secondary, as there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups.[6]School reviewingERO evaluated how effectively schools undertook self review of their provision for international students. Figure 1 shows that half of the schools were highly effective and just over a third were generally...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-international-students-2/findings/

  4. Addressing cultural and linguistic diversity

    Diversity is a defining feature of our world in this time of increasing globalisation and migration, and it is reflected in our communities. The learning environment is no exception. New Zealand ranks third among OECD countries for the highest proportion of overseas born residents (OECD, 2017) and Auckland city now has one of the highest proportions of immigrants of any city in the OECD.Part 1 of this report defines diversity, its benefits and challenges, describes who are our diverse learners,...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/addressing-cultural-and-linguistic-diversity/

  5. Appendix Three: Self-review questions

    1. How effectively is the school reviewing its provisions and outcomes for international students? We review our performance annually and record the outcomes in a form that can be made available to the Ministry of Education if requested (s28.3 of the Code). Our review process is ongoing and is based on analysis of a range of information about students’ welfare, academic progress, and social integration. Our BOT receives annual reports based on self review and strategic planning of the internat...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provisions-for-international-students/appendix-three-self-review-questions/

  6. Appendix 2: Self review questions for your school

    1. How effectively is our school reviewing its provision for international students? we monitor compliance with the Code effectively to ensure all requirements are met we report annually to the Ministry of Education on the results of our self review our BOT receives annual reports based on self review and strategic planning of the international programme our review process is based on analysis of a range of information about students’ welfare, academic progress, and social integration. 2. Wh...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-international-students-2/appendix-2-self-review-questions-for-your-school/

  7. Executive summary

    Diverse New ZealandIncreasingly diverse communities are evident throughout New Zealand. Auckland is New Zealand’s most culturally diverse city, with over 100 ethnicities and more than 150 languages spoken on a daily basis. Thirty‑nine percent of Auckland residents were born outside of New Zealand and 51 percent of Auckland’s population are multi‑lingual. The learner population in Auckland and New Zealand is rapidly becoming heterogeneous, as is evident through the diversity of lea...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/executive-summary/

  8. Findings

    ERO evaluated the provision of education for international students in all schools with international students that were reviewed during Terms 3 and 4, 2011. The evaluation included 51 schools (state, integrated and private). The average number of international students in these schools was five for primary schools and 15 for secondary schools.Reviewers made judgements on six aspects of the provisions and outcomes for international students. Overall, 29 percent of schools were judged to be highl...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provisions-for-international-students/findings/

  9. Appendix Two: Key evaluative questions, indicators of good practice, criteria for judgements

    Q1. How systematic is the school’s overall approach to enrolling international students? Indicators of good practice The school has: a rationale and objectives for enrolling IS a strategic plan for developing their provisions for IS/ international programme planned strategies and effective systems for providing for IS school understands its obligations and responsibilities for IS professional learning and development provided on cross-cultural understanding and supporting IS recog...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provisions-for-international-students/appendix-two-key-evaluative-questions-indicators-of-good-practice-criteria-for-judgements/

  10. Context and rationale for this evaluation

    Context and rationale for this evaluationNew Zealand has an ageing teacher workforce. Data from Education Counts shows that 8,343 of the 53,861 staff in schools are aged 60 and over (about 16 percent of the workforce). This data is not available for early learning services. There has also been a decline in the number of students commencing, or graduating from, ITE programmes since 2008. Given the likely shift in the teacher workforce profile over the next few years, it is important that teacher...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/newly-graduated-teachers-preparation-and-confidence-to-teach/context-and-rationale-for-this-evaluation/

  11. Discussion and implications

    Aotearoa mosaic: valuing cultural and linguistic diversityThe early learning and schooling population in New Zealand is rapidly becoming more diverse. This trend is most apparent in Auckland, which remains New Zealand’s most culturally and linguistically diverse city and region. Migration trends also show that Auckland is poised to grow more diverse in the years to come.Supporting culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners to achieve and succeed is important for two reasons.Foremos...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/responding-to-language-diversity-in-auckland/discussion-and-implications/

  12. Māori to English R

    A E I O U H K M N P R T W NG WH R rā (mō ngā rā kei te heke mai): further; long term rahi (ka rahi rawa atu ngā ... i ...): enhance rahinga (te rahinga o ...): maximum rahinga (te rahinga ōrau): high percentage raihana-ā-noho: licence to occupy raihana-ā-wā: sessional licence raimatia (kua raimatia): paved rangahau-ā-tatau: quantitative research rāngai: sector rāngai ahumahi: industry sector rangapū: collective(ly) rangatiratanga (tino rangatiratanga):...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-kupu-arotake-list-of-maori-english-education-term/maori-to-english-a/maori-to-english-r/

  13. 04 Making sure all teachers have the knowledge to enable literacy success for every child

    ERO’s report Accelerating the progress of priority learners in primary schools (2013) identified the need for ongoing professional learning and development (PLD) to build teachers’ confidence to understand and use strategies to accelerate learning for children needing additional support. Teachers at HOKOWHITU SCHOOL demonstrated a well considered commitment to accelerating learning for these children by implementing new practices, particularly in classrooms. Leaders and teachers were reflect...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/keeping-children-engaged-and-achieving-in-writing/04-making-sure-all-teachers-have-the-knowledge-to-enable-literacy-success-for-every-child/

  14. Exemplar Review - Papatoetoe Kindergarten - June 2018

    BackgroundIntroductionUnder Part 28 of the Education Act 1989 the Chief Review Officer has the power to administer reviews either general or relating to particular matters, of the performance of applicable (pre-tertiary) organisations in relation to the applicable services they provide, and prepare reports on the undertaking and results of such reviews.An exemplar report may be produced when ERO finds an organisation demonstrates effective practice in relation to specific aspects of performance....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/exemplar-reports/exemplar-review-papatoetoe-kindergarten-june-2018/

  15. Responding to linguistically diverse learners

    Most people in the world speak two or more languages. Although New Zealand has three official languages, including New Zealand Sign Language, many children do not have the opportunity to develop competency in more than one language.Two or more languages are learned relatively easily in the first three years of life, which is a sensitive period for language learning. Babies are born with the innate ability to recognise every sound in any language, but this ability declines after about the age of...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/extending-their-language-expanding-their-world/responding-to-linguistically-diverse-learners/

  16. St. Joseph's School (Onehunga) - Oracy review

    A distributed leadership approach to school internal evaluation at St Joseph's Onehunga means that one staff member takes responsibility and is given release time for leading a review of a particular curriculum area or a particular initiative. This has helped to build capacity to undertake review. Teachers also analyse and respond to assessment data in their own classes. They set class targets which are reported each term to the senior leadership team. Reviews at different layers of the school a...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/internal-evaluation-good-practice/st-josephs-school-onehunga-oracy-review/

  17. Key features necessary to support students in STPs

    ERO identified key features that contributed to overall success of the STPs in raising student engagement, achievement and effective transitions. Leadership and partnershipERO found several aspects of leadership within the STPs that were working well and some aspects that could be strengthened. These came under four broad headings: leadership in schools, leadership in the TEO, partnership and self review.School leadershipWhen TEO and school leaders were closely involved in the STP decision maki...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/secondary-tertiary-programmes-trades-academies-what-works-and-next-steps/key-features-necessary-to-support-students-in-stps/

  18. 1. Achieving excellence and equity to reduce disparities

    Papatoetoe North School is a Years 1 to 6 Auckland school. In July 2016, the roll of 821 students included 397 children from different Pacific groups, 231 Asian (mostly Indian), 171 Māori and 14 Pākehā/ European or other ethnic groups. Three hundred children were funded as ESOL (English as a second language) students. The school’s leaders and teachers had focused on giving the children, who come from a relatively low socioeconomic area, the rich social capital that is their right. They h...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/teaching-approaches-and-strategies-that-work/achieving-excellence-and-equity-to-reduce-disparities/