Results for "inclusive"

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  1. New ERO national report - Inclusive practices for students with special needs in schools

    05 March 2015The Education Review Office (ERO) has released a new national report. This report is available online only – use the link below to read it online or download a copy.Inclusive practices for students with special needs in schoolsYou can also read the news release on this report from Education Minister Hekia Parata....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/news/new-ero-national-report-inclusive-practices-for-students-with-special-needs-in-schools/

  2. Including Students with High Needs

    ERO evaluated how well schools included students with high needs. Approximately three percent of the student population have significant physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, behavioural or intellectual impairment. ERO’s evaluation showed that approximately half of the schools in the study demonstrated inclusive practice, while 30 percent had ‘pockets of inclusive practice’ and 20 percent had few inclusive practices. Schools that had an ethical, committed, innovative, informed and coordinated approach to including students with high needs provide the examples of good practice for others to follow.

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs/

  3. National Report Summary - Including students with high needs primary schools

    This is the Education Review Office (ERO)’s latest report about inclusive practice in schools. The report focuses on students with high needs in primary schools and the school-level changes made to support inclusion since ERO reported in 2010. This new evaluation builds on ERO’s 2010 findings using information collected in Term 4, 2012.For the purposes of this report, high needs students are those with significant physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, behavioural or intellectual impa...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/national-report-summary-including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/

  4. Conclusion

    This evaluation found that approximately half of New Zealand schools demonstrate inclusive practice. This judgement was made, in part, considering how these schools responded to the needs of the students who were at the school at the time. These schools may be less inclusive should they enrol different students with high needs, especially students whose behaviour, or medical needs are not understood by staff. Significant proportions of schools had some or few inclusive practices. For the 30 pe...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs/conclusion/

  5. Overview

    In 2010 the Ministry of Education completed a review of special education and subsequently Success for All[1] was launched. Success for All included a target that, by 2014, 80 percent of schools would be doing a good job and none would be doing a poor job of including students with special needs. This target was informed by ERO’s 2010 report – Including Students with High Needs.[2] High needs students are those in the top three percent of need for support for learning. ERO’s 2010 report fo...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/overview/

  6. Foreword

    Inclusive education is not just about getting the child or young person into the classroom, it’s about making sure that the student has the opportunity to learn and achieve. It’s about sharing information to understand what’s working and what’s not and to identify the links between inclusive practice and educational achievement. It is ERO’s job to evaluate and report on the education and care of students in schools and early childhood services. This is our fourth national report on i...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusive-practices-for-students-with-special-education-needs-in-schools/foreword/

  7. Appendix 1: ERO's recent reports on students wih special educaion needs

    Including students with high needs (2010) The 2010 evaluation focused on students with significant physical, sensory, neurological, psychiatric, behavioural or intellectual impairments. These students with high needs make up approximately three percent of the student population. The evaluation defined inclusion as students with high needs successfully enrolling, participating and achieving in the academic, extracurricular and social life of their school. The evaluation found that approximately...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusive-practices-for-students-with-special-education-needs-in-schools/appendix-1-eros-recent-reports-on-students-wih-special-educaion-needs/

  8. Appendix 3: Inclusive schools matrix

    In the table below are three categories related to levels of school inclusiveness for high needs students. These have been developed from ERO’s 2010 report Including Students With High Needs. Mostly inclusive practice Schools in this category will show strong inclusive practices in most areas. There may be some aspects of school performance that could be improved – but the performance of a school overall sees students with high needs happy, socially engaged and learning in line with the...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/appendix-3-inclusive-schools-matrix/

  9. Overview

    This evaluation examined how well schools include students with high needs. Approximately three percent of students identified as high needs. For the purposes of this evaluation, inclusion involved students with high needs successfully enrolling, participating and achieving in the academic, extra-curricular and social life of their school. This evaluation found that approximately half of the 229 schools reviewed demonstrated mostly inclusive practice. This judgement is based on the context and...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs/overview/

  10. Introduction

    Success for AllThe Ministry of Education (The Ministry) launched Success for All – Every Child, Every School in October 2010 as a result of its review of special education. Success for All included some significant initiatives, for example: extending Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS) funding to an additional 1,000 students extending the Communications Service to 1,000 students aged 5 to 8 years with communication needs who don’t qualify for ORS publishing and distributing best practice guideli...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/introduction/

  11. Conclusion

    In this evaluation, ERO found that a higher proportion of schools were mostly inclusive, compared with the 2010 evaluation. The majority of schools were found to have a welcoming and inclusive tone, and fewer schools expressed overtly exclusionary attitudes towards students with high needs than previously. Self review continues as an area needing development in many schools. Trustees, leaders and teachers need more than informal anecdotal evidence about what is working for these high needs stu...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/conclusion/

  12. Appendix 2: Ministry of Education developments in special education since 2010

    Success for All – Every School, Every ChildIn 2010 the Ministry of Education led a review of special education. More than 2000 people made submissions about the qualities required for inclusive schools, effective transition processes, funding, resources, professional learning and development and system-wide accountability and responsiveness. ERO’s 2010 report, Including Students with High Needs, was one of the documents that informed the review’s overall findings.Some significant initiativ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusive-practices-for-students-with-special-education-needs-in-schools/appendix-2-ministry-of-education-developments-in-special-education-since-2010/

  13. Findings

    Overall judgementsERO found that 77 percent of schools were mostly inclusive, 16 percent demonstrated some inclusive practices and seven percent demonstrated few inclusive practices. This is compared to the results from the 2010 evaluation in Figure 1 below.Figure 1: Comparison of school inclusiveness judgements 2010-2012Changes at the school level since 2010ERO investigated what key changes schools had made since October 2010 with their approach to including students with high needs.Many of the...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs-primary-schools/findings/

  14. Commentary

    Legislation, Ministry of Education expectations, and the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, all send clear and strong messages to early childhood services about inclusion of children with special needs. ERO’s evaluation of services’ inclusion of children with moderate to severe special needs indicates that many services are doing a good job, but that leaders and educators also face challenges in doing so. New Zealand research on inclusion in early childhood services, and anecdotal ev...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusion-of-children-with-special-needs-in-early-childhood-services/commentary/

  15. Introduction

    IntroductionThis evaluation examines how well students with special education needs are included in New Zealand schools. It focuses on their enrolment, participation, engagement and achievement and includes students with both high and moderate needs.These students may have a range of educational needs, some short-term and some long-term. They include learning needs as a result of communication, behavioural, social, sensory, physical, neurological, psychiatric or intellectual impairments.The eval...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusive-practices-for-students-with-special-education-needs-in-schools/introduction/

  16. Introduction

    A 2010 Education Review Office (ERO) report, Including Students with High Needs,[2] found that half of schools demonstrated mostly inclusive practices for students with high needs. Thirty percent of schools were found to have some areas of good performance, and 20 percent had few inclusive practices. ERO recommended that school staff should: use the report’s findings, case studies, self-review questions and inclusive teaching indicators to review the extent to which students with high needs ar...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-special-needs-school-questionnaire-responses/introduction/

  17. Overview

    A Government priority is that every child has the opportunity to participate in early childhood education (ECE). This Education Review Office evaluation of how well early childhood services include children with moderate to severe special needs supports this priority.ERO undertook this evaluation in 268 early childhood services (ECS) reviewed in Terms 3 and 4, 2011. Just over a third of services (104) had children with moderate to severe special needs[1] enrolled. The evaluation focused on the f...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusion-of-children-with-special-needs-in-early-childhood-services/overview/

  18. Overview

    ERO’s 2010 report Including Students with High Needs [1] found that half of schools demonstrated mostly inclusive practices for students with high needs, 30 percent had some inclusive practices, and 20 percent had few inclusive practices. Subsequently, the Government, through the Success for All policy, requires all schools to demonstrate inclusive practice by the end of 2014, with a goal to have 80 percent of schools doing a good job, and none doing a poor job, of including and supporting s...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-special-needs-school-questionnaire-responses/overview/