Results for "internal evaluation"

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  1. Publications update February 2017

    New publications School trustees booklet: helping you ask the right questionsThis booklet is for boards of trustees. It focuses on student achievement and wellbeing, and the role the board plays in these two areas. The booklet includes questions and information that will guide discussions with school leaders and trustees. Online only.  Extending their language - expanding their world: Children’s oral language (birth-8 years)Research evidence shows early in a child’s life is a critical tim...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/news/publications-update-february-2017/

  2. Conclusion

    This collection of narratives shows how some schools 'do and use' effective internal evaluation for improvement. In all of the 13 schools, internal evaluation was valued by leaders and trustees, who made sufficient time and resources available for genuine, improvement-focused inquiry into the areas that mattered most for their learners. Through widespread participation in internal evaluation, supported by access to internal and external expertise, these schools were building the capacity and cap...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/internal-evaluation-good-practice/conclusion/

  3. PART 3: Complementary evaluation in early childhood service reviews

    Complementary evaluation is the purposeful interaction between internal and external evaluation. It implies a mutually beneficial relationship that recognises the distinct purposes of each and where the overlap lies.ERO’s external evaluation process is both proportional and responsive to the service’s self review. It responds to the early childhood service’s overall capacity and capability to evaluate its own performance. ERO’s external evaluation also has a role to play in building the...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-early-childhood-services/part-3-complementary-evaluation-in-early-childhood-service-reviews/

  4. Foreword

    The Education Review Office (ERO) first introduced evaluation indicators in 2003, revising them in 2010. This new version reflects a deepening understanding of how schools improve, and the role that evaluation plays in that process. It also reflects a strengthened relationship between ERO’s approaches to evaluation in English-medium and Māori-medium settings. The evaluation indicators and supporting materials will evolve and change over time in the light of new research and evaluation finding...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/school-evaluation-indicators/foreword/

  5. Getting the most out of external evaluation

    Reflecting on these questions will provide you with an overview of your internal evaluation findings to discuss with ERO.  You do not need to provide any written response to these questions ahead of the onsite evaluation.We will use your school’s learner outcome information and internal evaluation to work with you to design the external evaluation for your school context. This will happen on the first day of the evaluation.Outcomes for learners What are the outcomes that are valued for all le...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/how-ero-reviews/ero-reviews-of-schools-and-kura/getting-the-most-out-of-your-external-evaluation/

  6. Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako: Working towards collaborative practice

    An additional resource to Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako: Collaboration to Improve Learner Outcomes. This resource is designed to support CoL | Kāhui Ako as they work towards effective collaborative practice. It is framed around key questions in each of the seven effective practice areas and is able to be used both as evidence-based progressions and as a useful internal evaluation tool.

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-working-towards-collaborative-practice/

  7. Processes and reasoning

    Internal evaluation requires those involved to engage in deliberate, systematic processes and reasoning, with improved outcomes for all learners as the ultimate aim. Those involved collaborate to: >    investigate and scrutinise practice >    analyse data and use it to identify priorities for improvement >    monitor implementation of improvement actions and evaluate their impact >    generate timely information about progress towards goals and the impact of actions taken....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/effective-internal-evaluation-for-improvement/processes-and-reasoning/

  8. Sources of wellbeing data for internal evaluation

    Schools already collect data that can deepen knowledge of student wellbeing and the processes supporting it.Data sources may include, but are not limited to: teacher observations in the classroom, the playground and assemblies Wellbeing@School and Me and My School survey results including student, teacher, parent, whanau and community voices. student profiles or portfolios interviews and meetings with parents and whanau student management systems achievement data - national standards, NCEA traum...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-success-a-resource-for-schools/sources-of-wellbeing-data-for-internal-evaluation/

  9. Foreword

    This report reinforces the importance for schools to identify the specific needs of individual students and to build a plan around those needs to raise student achievement for all.The biggest challenge for the New Zealand education system is the persistent disparities in achievement. Setting effective targets and creating the conditions in which all kids can excel will reduce these disparities. When this happens, the focus is on the students with leaders and teachers adapting their practice to r...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/raising-student-achievement-through-targeted-actions/foreword/

  10. Engaging in effective internal evaluation

    The whole point of internal evaluation is to assess what is and is not working, and for whom, and then to determine what changes are needed, particularly to advance equity and excellence goals. Internal evaluation involves asking good questions, gathering fit-for-purpose data and information, and then making sense of that information. Much more than a technical process, evaluation is deeply influenced by the school's values and how it sees its role in the community. Effective internal evaluation...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/effective-school-evaluation/engaging-in-effective-internal-evaluation/

  11. Appendix 1: ERO reports referred to in this publication

    2016  Vocational Pathways: Authentic and Relevant Learning (May)   2015 Raising Student Achievement Through Targeted Actions (December)   Effective School Evaluation: How To Do and Use Internal Evaluation for Improvement (November) Internal Evaluation: Good Practice (November) Educationally Powerful Connections with Parents and Whanau (November) Secondary-Tertiary Programmes (Trades Academies): What Works and Next Steps (June) Continuity of Learning: Transitions from Early Childhood Servic...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/school-leadership-that-works/appendix-1-ero-reports-referred-to-in-this-publication/

  12. The outcome and process indicators

    The following sections set out the outcome indicators and the process indicators. The learner-focused outcome indicators are derived from the valued outcomes identified in The New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. They assume a holistic approach to learners’ wellbeing, development and success.  They also support the three goals identified by Mason Durie as critical for the educational advancement of Māori: enabling Māori to live as Māori, facilitating participation as citiz...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/school-evaluation-indicators/the-outcome-and-process-indicators/

  13. Scope, depth and focus

    Internal evaluations vary greatly in scope, depth and focus depending on the purpose and the context. An evaluation may be strategic, linked to vision, values, goals and targets; or it may be a business-as-usual review of, for example, policy or procedures. It could also be a response to an unforeseen (emergent) event or issue.Figure 1 shows how these different purposes can all be viewed as part of a common improvement agenda.FIGURE 1. TYPES OF INTERNAL EVALUATION  Strategic evaluation Strategi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/effective-internal-evaluation-for-improvement/scope-depth-and-focus/

  14. Leaders and kaiako in half of the 290 services were not yet focused on deciding what learning matters here as they implemented Te Whāriki

    Many services had taken some steps to identify prioritiesSteps included: philosophy review or development consultation with parents and whānau (usually through surveys) considering kaiako interests, knowledge and strengths recognising children’s strengths, interests and needs. Priorities varied in their focus on children’s learning and learning outcomes; few priorities considered the learning outcomes in Te Whāriki.Service leaders and kaiako generally only considered a narrow set of infor...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/te-whariki-2017-awareness-towards-implementation/leaders-and-kaiako-in-half-of-the-290-services-were-not-yet-focused-on-deciding-what-learning-matters-here-as-they-implemented-te-whariki/

  15. Te Manakotanga - Enrichment Evaluation Review

    This is carried out four-to-five years after the previous ERO review.Te Manakotanga - Enrichment Evaluation will be carried out where the whānau has highly effective self review, the kura is high performing and students attain high levels of achievement. ERO will provide an external evaluation that complements the internal self review of the kura. Leadership will also be considered as a contributor to the effectiveness of these kura.ERO offers the kura whānau options for how their evaluation w...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-anga-arotake/te-manakotanga-enrichment-evaluation-2/

  16. Bluestone School - Embedding teaching as inquiry

    This school was able to show a range of successful school internal evaluations and improvements including mathematics achievement, reducing bullying through restorative justice, and improving the quality of social science programmes.This evaluation took a long-term approach to creating the enabling conditions that support both school-level internal evaluation and teaching as inquiry. The review and subsequent changes deliberately built teachers' evaluative capacity and developed a more collabora...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/internal-evaluation-good-practice/bluestone-school-embedding-teaching-as-inquiry/

  17. Awareness of Te Whāriki 2017: Early Insights

    In the second half of 2017, we gathered data from 290 early learning services about their awareness of the updated early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki 2017. A questionnaire was completed by service leaders and kaiako, in addition to the data we collected during the scheduled review of these services.Our initial analysis of the data indicates a high level of awareness of Te Whāriki 2017. Leaders and kaiako like the simplicity, layout and user‑friendly language and told us about their grow...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/news/ero-insights-term-1/awareness-of-te-whariki-2017-early-insights/

  18. Collaboration to improve learner outcomes

    The Government introduced its Investing in Educational Success policy in 2014 with the aim of raising student achievement by promoting effective collaboration between schools and strengthening the alignment of education pathways. The policy provided for new leadership and teaching roles in and across schools and for the deployment of expert partners, both academic and practitioner.It is expected that up to 250 Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako will be in place by 2017, with the leaders of eac...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/