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  1. Appendix One: ERO’s other reports about the National Standards

    ERO has published a series of reports about the implementation of the National Standards:Working with the National Standards within The New Zealand Curriculum,August 2010.Working with the National Standards: Raising Student Achievement in Reading, Writing and Mathematics, March 2011.Working with the National Standards to Promote Students’ Progress and Achievement, March 2012.These reports are available on ERO’s website at http://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/category/national-evaluationsERO i...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-national-standards-good-practice/appendix-one-eros-other-reports-about-the-national-standards/

  2. Next steps

    To improve their understanding and implementation of self review, ERO recommends that early childhood services: improve processes for the gathering, analysis and use of information in self review; seek professional development to improve their understanding and implementation of self review [2]; use existing Ministry of Education publications to increase their understanding of self review; and use external review to complement their self review. ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education co...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/implementing-self-review-in-early-childhood-services/next-steps/

  3. Next steps

    ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education supports schools to: better use student achievement information to review and adapt their school’s curriculum so that it is responsive to all learners access and use research findings, such as that in the Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) publications, particularly the BES exemplars, to introduce different teaching practices that have been shown to accelerate learners’ progress in New Zealand schools. ERO recommends that school trustees, leaders...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/mathematics-in-years-4-to-8-developing-a-responsive-curriculum/next-steps/

  4. Introduction

    This overview of the processes and reasoning involved in effective internal evaluation for improvement draws on a recently published resource Effective Internal Evaluation – How to do and use internal evaluation for improvement (2015).1 This resource was jointly published by the Education Review Office and the Ministry of Education. Section Two of the resource – “Engaging in effective internal evaluation” describes both the ‘how to’ and the evaluative thinking that contributes to imp...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/effective-internal-evaluation-for-improvement/introduction/

  5. Videos

      The collection of videos and publications is called Improvement in Action and illustrates what works to achieve successful outcomes for all children and young people in the education system.The video sequences bring to life ERO’s School Evaluation Indicators. E whakatairanga ana tēnei rauemi ā-ipurangi i ētahi kura e tino whai hua nei ā rātau mahi mō ā rātau ākonga. E kīia ana tēnei kohinga ataata, pānuitanga hoki ko Te Ahu Whakamua, ā, ka whakaatuhia he mahi e tutuki momoho...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/videos/

  6. Resources to support trustees and principals

    The Ministry, NZSTA and other education agencies provide many resources and tools to support trustees in their role as employer. Key resources are described in Appendix 1.Key findings The education agencies provide detailed resources for boards and trustees about their role as employer. Many schools do not know about these resources or use them. Approximately 60 percent of board chairpersons and half the principals surveyed had used the Ministry publication Effective Governance: Recruiting and M...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/student-safety-in-schools-recruiting-and-managing-staff/resources-to-support-trustees-and-principals/

  7. Background

    Priority learners are groups of students who have been identified as historically not experiencing success in the New Zealand schooling system. These include many Māori and Pacific learners, those from low socio-economic backgrounds, and students with special education needs.Their “success in education is essential to the Government’s goal of building a productive and competitive economy...[and helping them develop] the skills needed to reach their full potential and contribute to the econo...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/evaluation-at-a-glance-priority-learners-in-new-zealand-schools/background/

  8. Overview

    This good practice report shows the range of ways schools have effectively done and used internal evaluation for improvement. ERO visited 13 schools in Terms 3 and 4, 2014, that had been identified during their regular ERO reviews as having effective internal evaluation.1ERO investigated: how the schools knew what and how to improve how the schools knew how they were going what conditions and actions supported the schools' internal evaluation activities how the schools had developed capability a...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/internal-evaluation-good-practice/overview/

  9. Conclusion

    Through our national evaluation reports, ERO has built up a body of knowledge about what the implementation of Te Whāriki currently looks like in New Zealand early learning settings. This retrospective study provides a synthesis of the findings of these reports, highlighting what is important and what is working well, and giving examples of effective practice in each area.The depth and richness of Te Whāriki is internationally recognised, however, the holistic and interpretive nature of this c...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/early-learning-curriculum/conclusion/

  10. Next steps

    ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education supports schools to: improve their assessment practices to more effectively identify the student’s next teaching steps and to monitor how well their interventions or strategies have accelerated the progress of priority learners access and use research findings, such as those in the Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) publications, particularly the BES exemplars, to introduce different teaching practices that have been shown to accelerate learners’ pr...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/accelerating-the-progress-of-priority-learners-in-primary-schools/next-steps/

  11. Foreword

    How children and young people feel at school has a major impact on how confident they are and how well they learn. There is no single measure for wellbeing, but the factors that contribute to it are interrelated and interdependent.Most children and young people enjoy school, thrive and succeed. But for some, negative experiences, behaviours or emotions during the passage from childhood to adulthood can affect their wellbeing and lead to long-term negative consequences.In 2012 the Prime Minister...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-success-effective-practice/foreword/

  12. Promoting collaboration through Kāhui Ako

    The opportunity to form and collaborate through Kāhui Ako was first implemented by the Ministry of Education (the Ministry) in 2014. The aim was to bring together schools, kura, early learning services, tertiary providers, and the wider community to raise learners’ achievement and strengthen education pathways.The Ministry had previously promoted collaboration between schools through initiatives such as Building Evaluative Capability in Schooling Improvement, Kia Eke Panuku Building on Succe...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/collaboration-in-practice-insights-into-implementation/promoting-collaboration-through-kahui-ako/

  13. About ERO reviews

    The purpose of an ERO review An ERO review looks at how an early learning service or school reaches positive learning outcomes - knowledge, skills, attitude and habits - for all children and young people. We’re interested in what’s working well and where improvements can be made.Our review process works with an early learning service or school’s own evaluation processes. It also supports a culture of ongoing improvement.View our step by step guide to the review process.Why we make reports...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/how-ero-reviews/information-for-parents/

  14. Introduction

    The evaluation questionsIn 2011 ERO evaluated the literacy and mathematics assessment and planning practices used in schools to support students’ learning at Years 9 and 10. The evaluation sought to answer the question: How effectively do schools use literacy and mathematics achievement information to improve learning for Years 9 and 10 students?Understanding what students know and can do, and making use of it as the basis for classroom and school planning, is fundamental to students’ learni...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/literacy-and-mathematics-in-years-9-and-10-using-achievement-information-to-promote-success/introduction/

  15. Contact us

    General informationMain contacts: Choose from the regions listed below.Local enquiries: Contact an office from your region, using details below. Or ring ERO's National Office on 04-499 2489.General enquiries: You can email info@ero.govt.nz. If you need to call us, phone 04 499 2489.Publications: Please check our individual publications to see if printed copies are available. If print copies are available, there will be a link on the individual publication's main page to 'order a print copy'...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/contact-us/

  16. Conclusions

    Managers and educators in early childhood services are developing a growing awareness of the importance of self review in the context of their day-to-day practice. The purpose of self review and how it can be implemented are increasingly recognised and understood as a result of professional development and recent Ministry of Education initiatives such as the publication of Nga Arohaehae Whai Hua: Self-review Guidelines for Early Childhood Education in 2006. However, ERO found considerable var...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/implementing-self-review-in-early-childhood-services/conclusions/

  17. Foreword

    The Education Review Office (ERO) first introduced evaluation indicators in 2003, revising them in 2010. This new version reflects a deepening understanding of how schools improve, and the role that evaluation plays in that process. It also reflects a strengthened relationship between ERO’s approaches to evaluation in English-medium and Māori-medium settings. The evaluation indicators and supporting materials will evolve and change over time in the light of new research and evaluation finding...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/school-evaluation-indicators/foreword/

  18. Next steps

    ERO recommends that leaders and teachers in early learning services and schools: use resources such as Effective School Evaluation: how to do and use internal evaluation for improvement4 and those about teaching as inquiry5 to evaluate the extent to which their curriculum strengthens oral language learning and provides evidence of children’s progress and achievement make better use of existing resources, such as Much More Than Words6 and Learning Through Talk7 to promote and support children...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/extending-their-language-expanding-their-world/next-steps/

  19. Appendix 1: Reviewing quality in your service

    High quality programmes that contribute to positive outcomes for childrenHow well does our service promote and extend each child’s learning and development through providing a high quality programme?How effective is our: programme planning? assessment? What is the quality of the programme children experience?What expectations do we have about children’s learning and development?How well do we promote positive outcomes for children through acknowledging and supporting: tikanga Māori and te r...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/quality-in-early-childhood-services/appendix-1-reviewing-quality-in-your-service/

  20. Conclusion

    The summary document for Ka Hikitia, (2009), notes that “the system must fit the student rather than the student fitting the system. Such an approach requires students, educators, families, whānau, iwi, communities and government to work together in partnership and learn from each other”.This evaluation highlights the need for managers and educators in early childhood services to think about what this means for their work with Māori children and their whānau. While some services are highl...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services/conclusion/