Results for "self review"

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  1. Te Rākeitanga - Expansion Evaluation

    Te Rākeitanga - Expansion Evaluation is the basis for all ERO’s evaluations. The methodology is adapted for Te Pupuketanga and Te Manakotanga according to what is needed and most constructive for individual kura. There is a strong focus on self review, and on information from the kura and its whānau, to enable ERO to evaluate and report in a way that will be of ongoing use to the kura. Criteria for scheduling a Te Rākeitanga - Expansion Evaluation The majority of kura will be in this catego...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-anga-arotake/te-rakeitanga-expansion-evaluation/

  2. Conclusion

    A large majority of schools are providing effectively for their international students. Almost all schools are providing effective pastoral care, social integration and education programmes for their international students. Self review continues to be a concern in 36 percent of schools. As noted in ERO’s previous reports, this was the weakest aspect of provision for international students. ERO rarely found sufficient information from the school’s own review on which to reliably base their...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provision-for-international-students/conclusion/

  3. Te Manakotanga - Enrichment Evaluation Review

    This is carried out four-to-five years after the previous ERO review.Te Manakotanga - Enrichment Evaluation will be carried out where the whānau has highly effective self review, the kura is high performing and students attain high levels of achievement. ERO will provide an external evaluation that complements the internal self review of the kura. Leadership will also be considered as a contributor to the effectiveness of these kura.ERO offers the kura whānau options for how their evaluation w...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-anga-arotake/te-manakotanga-enrichment-evaluation-2/

  4. Appendix 3: Self-review tool for Partnership with Whānau

    Theme Self-review questions Culture of the service To what extent does the service recognise and build on the knowledge and expertise Māori children and their whānau bring to the service? Service philosophy How well are the aspirations and goals of whānau understood by educators and reflected in the learning of Māori children? To what extent does the service value and implement Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles? Self-review To what extent are whānau involved in th...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/partnership-with-whanau-maori-in-early-childhood-services/appendix-3-self-review-tool-for-partnership-with-whanau/

  5. Appendix 4: Self-review questions

    Self review questions for your school School culture and leadership for including students with high needs To what extent do the staff at your school expect to adapt their practice to support the achievement of students with high needs? How caring is the culture of your school towards students with high needs? To what extent do staff at your school have access to a wide range of knowledge, strategies and networks to support students with high needs and their whānau/families? Self review...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/including-students-with-high-needs/appendix-4-self-review-questions/

  6. Part 7: Process guidelines for reviews

    NotificationERO begins the process with an email notification that gives the home-based early childhood service time to prepare for the external review.In the email, ERO includes links to electronic versions of this document, the Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists, a hard copy of the Self Report and links to electronic versions of other relevant documents.ERO gives the service information to distribute to coordinators/visiting teachers, parents, families, whānau and educators ab...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-home-based-education-and-care-services/part-7-process-guidelines-for-reviews/

  7. Conclusion

    At least 90 percent of schools were highly or mostly effective in their overall approach, pastoral care, education programme, and social integration of students. However, only three‑quarters of schools were able to show that their international students were progressing and achieving very well or well. When schools were judged to be less effective this was often because they did not have evidence about the effectiveness of the provisions they made. As in ERO’s 2010 report, self review was...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/schools-provisions-for-international-students/conclusion/

  8. Part 7: Process guidelines for reviews

    Notification ERO begins the process with a notification email that gives the hospital-based service time to prepare for the external review. In the notification email ERO includes links to electronic versions of He Pou Tātaki (this document), the Hospital-based Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists, the Self Report and links to electronic versions of other relevant documents. Self report The self report plays a significant part in the ERO review. ERO’s evaluation builds on the inform...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-methodology-for-ero-reviews-in-hospital-based-education-and-care-services/part-7-process-guidelines-for-reviews/

  9. Next steps

    On the basis of this report, ERO recommends that schools: use the self-review questions and science teaching indicators in this report to review the quality of science education for students in Years 5 to 8; and review the quality of their assessment of science in Years 5 to 8 and the usefulness of the information for reporting to: a) the board of trustees to use in making their decisions; andb) parents about their children’s achievement and progress in science. ERO also recommends that prov...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/science-in-years-5-to-8-capable-and-competent-teaching/next-steps/

  10. Conclusion

    Teacher appraisal has two purposes: improvement - appraisal supports personal development and school capability to meet student outcome goals professional accountability - appraisal provides assurances to the wider community that teaching standards are rigorously applied. Twenty percent of schools in the sample had high quality appraisal systems that contributed to both of these purposes. Many schools have all the mandated components of an appraisal system but haven’t fully understood how to p...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/supporting-school-improvement-through-effective-teacher-appraisal/conclusion/

  11. PART 7: Process Guidelines for Reviews

    NotificationERO begins the process with a notification letter that gives the early childhood service time to prepare for the external review.With the notification letter ERO sends He Pou Tātaki (this document) the Guidelines, Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists, a hard copy of the Self Report and links to electronic versions of relevant documents.ERO gives the service information to distribute to teachers, parents and whānau about the review.Self reportsThe self report plays a...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-how-ero-reviews-early-childhood-services/part-7-process-guidelines-for-reviews/

  12. Next steps

    ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education supports schools to extend the focus of appraisal to include both accountability and improvement by: providing learning opportunities for school leaders to build the expertise needed for effective teacher appraisal, including the use of appraisal as a professional tool within an improvement culture ensuring policy coherence - so that the cycle of school planning and reporting, including goal-setting, is informed by the cycle of appraisal, and data ab...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/supporting-school-improvement-through-effective-teacher-appraisal/next-steps/