Results for "services"

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  1. Our leadership team

    Chief Executive/Chief Review OfficerNicholas PoleDeputy Chief Executive Review and ImprovementJane LeeDeputy Chief Executive Evaluation and PolicyHead of The Education Evaluation CentreRuth ShinodaDeputy Chief Executive Methodology and Professional PracticeDr Ro ParsonsDeputy Chief Executive Evaluation and Review MāoriLynda Pura-WatsonDeputy Chief Executive Corporate ServicesJeremy FranceDirectors Review and Improvement ServicesOur directors have responsibility for leading review and improvemen...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/footer-upper/about-ero/our-leadership-team/

  2. Next Steps

    ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education considers the findings of this report to: inform decisions about Equity Funding in its current review of ECE funding identify ways to increase early childhood services’ awareness of the expectations for use and requirements for reporting by early childhood services that receive Equity Funding. ERO recommends that early childhood services use the findings of this report to discuss and evaluate their use of Equity Funding....

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-early-childhood-services/next-steps/

  3. Appendix 2: Sample

    Data for this evaluation was gathered from 268 services reviewed in Terms 3 and 4 2011. Table 1 shows the types of services in the overall sample.Table 1: Service types for overall sample Service type Number Percentage of sample National percentage[37] Education and care 159 59 62 Kindergarten 53 20 17 Playcentre 37 14 12 Home‑based Network 18 7 9 Casual Education and Care 1 <1 <1 Total 268 100 100 The types of servi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/inclusion-of-children-with-special-needs-in-early-childhood-services/10-appendix-2-sample/

  4. Appendix 4: Characteristics of services and preparedness

    Table 1: Characteristics of the 45 well‑prepared services Service type # Ownership # Change factors  # Education and Care  27 (of 237)[11] Private 25 (of 201) None 32 (of 176)[12] Kindergarten  10 (of 54) Community  20 (of 161) Staff  8 (of 95) Home‑based 7 (of 40) Leadership 10 (of 108) Education and Care Ownership  1 (of 51) Casual Education and Care 1 (of 1) Other factors Six were having their first ERO review and 20 services were part o...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/preparedness-to-implement-te-whariki-2017/appendix-4-characteristics-of-services-and-preparedness/

  5. Digging deeper into the findings

    This section looks deeper into the information ERO collected from early learning services. It explores services’ involvement in and the impact of PLD, the use of appraisal, and the steps services have taken in reviewing and designing their local curriculum based on priorities for children’s learning.Better use could be made of professional learning and development and appraisal to support leaders and kaiako to implement Te WhārikiLeaders and kaiako in 88 percent of the early learning servic...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/preparedness-to-implement-te-whariki-2017/digging-deeper-into-the-findings/

  6. Methodology

    ERO identified early childhood services for this report from education reviews in 576 services undertaken in Term 4, 2008 and Terms 1 and 2, 2009. Eight services were selected for a further visit to gather more in-depth information about specific practices that underpinned their provision for Māori children and their whānau. A kindergarten association, reviewed when ERO was undertaking a pilot study for its report Māori Children in Early Childhood: Pilot Study, July 2008, was also included in...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/methodology/

  7. Conclusion

    The examples of good practice from the nine services described in this report show the many and varied ways services work with the parents and whānau of Māori children to build respectful relationships and develop partnerships for learning. Each service responds to its community in different ways. The examples highlight how services shape their curriculum and associated teaching and learning practices to enable Māori children to become competent and confident learners. All services, regardl...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/conclusion/

  8. Next steps

    ERO recommends that Pacific early childhood services that receive Equity Funding use self review to evaluate the effectiveness of their use of this funding. ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education: investigates the publication of baseline Pacific language resources to support Pacific children’s language, culture and identity, particularly for those Pacific services that receive Component C of Equity Funding considers the findings of this report in relation to the PEP target of increasi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-pacific-early-childhood-services/next-steps/

  9. Conclusion

    Effective employment practices aim to develop, strengthen and make the best use of staff skills and knowledge to enhance teaching practice and maximise the safety and learning for all children. The quality of the early childhood education workforce, in particular staff performance, impacts on the extent to which services have the capacity to promote positive learning outcomes for all children.ERO found that many services had a good working knowledge of employment policies and procedures and used...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/improving-quality-employment-responsibilities-in-kindergartens-and-education-and-care-services/conclusion/

  10. Foreword

    The Education Review Office (ERO) independently reviews and reports on the quality of education in schools and early childhood services. The focus of ERO’s reviews in hospital- based services is on the capacity of the service to contribute to children’s learning and promote their wellbeing.He Pou Tātaki: How ERO reviews hospital-based education and care services provides resources for ERO and hospital-based services to use during reviews. The resources included in this document reflect ERO...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-pou-tataki-methodology-for-ero-reviews-in-hospital-based-education-and-care-services/foreword/

  11. Introduction

    This report highlights how early childhood services keep up to date with changing regulations and legal requirements in order to effectively manage for children’s safety and wellbeing.Service owners/leaders may find this report useful when considering how to effectively and proactively stay informed about regulations and requirements. This report illustrates the various ways services ensure staff practices meet new regulations, and shares the resources they use to stay up to date.ERO investiga...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/meeting-requirements-for-childrens-safety-and-wellbeing-in-ece/introduction/

  12. Methodology

    ERO identified examples of good practice in some of the 387 early childhood services reviewed in Terms 1 and 2, 2012. The five services selected for this report had good practices for developing and responding to priorities for children’s learning. The services include an education and care service, a Pacific early childhood service, a Māori immersion centre, a kindergarten and a playcentre. Each example highlights the priorities that teachers have identified for the children at their servi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/priorities-for-childrens-learning-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/methodology/

  13. National Report Summary: Priorities for childrens learning in early childhood services and good practice

    Priorities for Children’s Learning in ECEs: Good Practice (November 2013) This good practice report presents examples from five early childhood services where priorities for children’s learning were well considered and reflected on. The five services were part of a national evaluation that ERO undertook in 2012 about curriculum priorities. They were subsequently chosen to feature in this good practice report. Their priorities were clear, reflected the context and philosophy of each service...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/priorities-for-childrens-learning-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/national-report-summary-priorities-for-childrens-learning-in-early-childhood-services-and-good-practice/

  14. Appendix 2: Sample of early childhood services

    ERO evaluated the provision for Māori children in all services that had a regular scheduled education review in Term 4, 2008 and Terms 1 and 2, 2009. The types and locality of services are shown in Tables 1 and 2 below.Table 2: Service Types Service type Number in study Percentage of sample National percentage [19] Casual education and care 6 1 1 Kindergartens 125 22 18 Playcentres 66 11 14 Education and care 334 58 60 Home-based Networks 45 8...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services/appendix-2-sample-of-early-childhood-services/

  15. Leaders and kaiako in half of the 290 services were not yet focused on deciding what learning matters here as they implemented Te Whāriki

    Many services had taken some steps to identify prioritiesSteps included: philosophy review or development consultation with parents and whānau (usually through surveys) considering kaiako interests, knowledge and strengths recognising children’s strengths, interests and needs. Priorities varied in their focus on children’s learning and learning outcomes; few priorities considered the learning outcomes in Te Whāriki.Service leaders and kaiako generally only considered a narrow set of infor...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/te-whariki-2017-awareness-towards-implementation/leaders-and-kaiako-in-half-of-the-290-services-were-not-yet-focused-on-deciding-what-learning-matters-here-as-they-implemented-te-whariki/

  16. Findings

    Working with Te Whāriki: as part of each service’s curriculumERO was interested in the links between the prescribed framework of principles and strands (Te Whāriki) and each service’s curriculum. An analysis of the data showed the ways in which services were using the prescribed framework of principles and strands and highlighted where services were working beyond this framework and engaging with the full curriculum document. It also showed where services were working in a very limited way...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/working-with-te-whariki/findings/

  17. Conclusion

    ERO’s evaluation has highlighted the variability across early childhood services in how well they identify and respond to their priorities for children’s learning. While most services have identified their priorities, in many these were not reflected in their curriculum and associated assessment and self-review practices.ERO is concerned that assessment remains an area for improvement in many services. ERO’s report, The Quality of Assessment in Early Childhood Education, November 2007,[29]...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/priorities-for-childrens-learning-in-early-childhood-services/conclusion/

  18. Introduction

    Equity Funding was introduced in March 2002 with a budget of $8.5 million. The objectives are to: reduce educational disparities between different groups in New Zealand reduce barriers to participation faced by under-represented groups in early childhood services support services to raise levels of educational achievement for these children. Equity Funding is ‘tagged’ and identifiable as an amount additional to a service’s ECE Funding Subsidy and 20 Hours ECE. It must be spent with the equ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/use-of-equity-funding-in-early-childhood-services/introduction/

  19. Overview

    In 2012, the Education Review Office (ERO) undertook a national evaluation that investigated: How effectively are early childhood services across New Zealand determining, enacting and reviewing their curriculum priorities to support education success for every learner?ERO reported its findings from this evaluation in two reports in May 2013 - Priorities for Children’s Learning in Early Childhood Services and Working with Te Whāriki.1This latest report, Priorities for Children’s Learning in...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/priorities-for-childrens-learning-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/overview/

  20. Introduction

    Children’s development of strong early foundations in literacy begins in the home. They are grown and enriched through participation in high quality early childhood education. It is a key priority for Government that every child achieves literacy and numeracy levels that enable their success. In New Zealand, children in early childhood services are exposed to a multitude of resources and experiences that engage and support their literacy learning.ERO evaluated literacy teaching and learning in...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/literacy-in-early-childhood-services-good-practice/introduction/