Results for "stand"

Displaying Page 1 of 2

  1. Appendix 4: Stand-down and suspension rates

    Source: www.educationcounts.govt.nz/indicators/main/student-engagement-participation/80346 , retrieved 24 January 2014.Figure 1: Age standardised stand-down rates by ethnic group and school quintile (2012) Figure 2: Age standardised suspension rates by ethnic group and school quintile (2012)  ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/appendix-4-stand-down-and-suspension-rates/

  2. Appendix 3: Stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions

    The Education Amendment Act 1 (the Act) allows for schools to stand-down, suspend, exclude or expel students from a state school. 2 The Act’s purpose is to provide the school with a range of responses when students’ behaviour may result in serious harm or constitute a harmful or dangerous example to others. The intent is to deal with students in a way that is fair and minimises disruption to their learning. Every stand-down, suspension, exclusion and expulsion must be reported to the Min...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/appendix-3-stand-downs-suspensions-exclusions-and-expulsions/

  3. Next steps

    Next stepsThe report recommends Stand Children’s Services leaders: develop and implement a communication strategy for schools further investigate and resolve issues with referrals in two villages review the role of the education team leaders to work more with schools increase the teaching actions in the therapeutic care and education plans extend internal evaluation to include effective practice and the impacts of teaching simplify the appraisal process increase professional development opport...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/an-evaluation-of-stand-childrens-services-childrens-villages/next-steps/

  4. Conclusion

    ConclusionStand Children’s Services is effectively responding to the wellbeing of children that have experienced trauma. Children’s therapeutic care and education (TCE) plans are well known by all staff and identify clear actions to assist the child develop socially and emotionally. Now that all the education units are fully staffed in each village priority should be given to ensuring children’s learning needs are responded to and are evident in the TCE plans. Priority should also be given...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/an-evaluation-of-stand-childrens-services-childrens-villages/conclusion/

  5. Introduction

    IntroductionBackgroundPreviously children with behavioural and social needs were referred to and attended one of six health camps situated across New Zealand. Each of the health camps had an associated school attached. In 2008 ERO evaluated the quality of provisions for children at the health camps and found the following significant areas that needed to improve: The children referred to health camps had multiple needs. The separation of responsibilities between the Ministry of Education and th...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/an-evaluation-of-stand-childrens-services-childrens-villages/introduction/

  6. Overview

    OverviewUntil recently children with behavioural and social needs were referred to and attended one of six health camps situated across New Zealand. Each of the six health camps had an associated school attached. In 2008 ERO evaluated the quality of provisions for children at the health camps and identified significant areas that needed to improve. ERO recommended that the Ministry of Education examine the role of health camps and their schools within the wider network provision of services for...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/an-evaluation-of-stand-childrens-services-childrens-villages/overview/

  7. Appendix 3: The specific requirements of enrolling schools

    The Alternative Education guidelines state that enrolling schools have the following responsibilities for students placed in AE. Responsibility for the pastoral and academic care of ALL students on their roll including input into the IEP and transition plans for AE students. Ensure that providers receive pertinent information on students entering AE, e.g. academic records, reason for referral etc. Academic achievement of all students, including AE students, is reflected in the overall achieve...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/secondary-schools-and-alternative-education-april-2011/appendix-3-the-specific-requirements-of-enrolling-schools/

  8. C. The Whānau Assurance Statement

    An important component of the review process is compliance with legal and regulatory requirements (including the National Education Guidelines and National Administration Guidelines), and with the undertakings and obligations set out in the kura charter. Collectively these constitute the main compliance requirements for Te Aho Matua kura kaupapa Māori.ERO has developed a Whānau Assurance Statement (WHAS) for use in kura reviews. This document sets out and explains the legal requirements applyi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/he-anga-arotake/c-the-whanau-assurance-statement/

  9. Gisborne Boys’ High School, East Coast

    BackgroundGisborne Boys’ High School (GBHS) is a secondary school, decile 3, located in the provincial city of Gisborne. The roll of 750 boys, including 63 percent of students of Māori descent.Tū Tāne and learning initiativesTū tāne – Stand a manSenior leaders decided that one way to improve the overall performance of students at GBHS was to increase the boys’ engagement both in the school and in their learning. They wanted to achieve this by improving the boys’ sense of self worth,...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/gisborne-boys-high-school-east-coast/

  10. Appendix 3: Glossary of terms and programmes

    Te Reo Maori English meaning hapu sub-tribe, kinship group iwi tribe, wider kinship group karakia prayer, grace kaupapa Maori Maori way of being pepeha a statement that identifies the ancestral links of Maori te ao Maori the Maori world te reo the Maori language tikanga customary practices Turangawaewae a place to stand; places where we feel especially empowered and connected; our foundation, our place in the world, our home. waiata song(s) whakapap...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/continuity-of-learning-transitions-from-early-childhood-services-to-schools/appendix-3-glossary-of-terms-and-programmes/

  11. Conclusion

    This report investigated how well services were keeping up to date with changing regulations and legal requirements amid changes to the relicensing of early childhood services.In just under 20 percent of services, proactive monitoring of resources was not present, resulting in these services being non-compliant with regulations. Non compliances were discussed on review and remedial action taken by the service or, if necessary, reported to the Ministry of Education for their action.Owners of priv...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/meeting-requirements-for-childrens-safety-and-wellbeing-in-ece/conclusion/

  12. Findings

    FindingsAn overview of findingsIn most villages, the education, social workers and support teams work together well to consistently implement therapeutic and care programmes for children that have experienced trauma. Many of the children have a range of complex emotional and social needs that are carefully prioritised to focus on what is most important for the child to succeed in the future. Consistently applied information gathering and sharing processes, and selection and orientation procedure...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/an-evaluation-of-stand-childrens-services-childrens-villages/findings/

  13. Appendix 3: Self-review questions for schools – promoting the success of Māori students

    The use of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success How effectively do staff understand and apply the principles of Ka Hikitia - Managing for Success? What actions has the school taken to directly improve the success of Māori students (as a result of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success)? What evidence does the school have to show that these actions have made substantial improvements to the engagement and achievement of Māori students? How effectively does the board understand and apply Ka Hikitia ...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/promoting-success-for-maori-students-schools-progress/appendix-3-self-review-questions-for-schools-promoting-the-success-of-maori-students/

  14. Introduction

    In its education reviews of schools with Pacific students, ERO evaluates how well these students are achieving and what the schools are doing to improve education outcomes for them. By asking what and how well schools are doing, ERO highlights the need for them to develop effective strategies for improving their education of Pacific students. Critical to success for all students is their presence at school, their engagement and participation in learning, and their success in achieving good edu...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/promoting-pacific-student-achievement/introduction/

  15. Appendix 3: Developing capabilities using key competencies

    This appendix explains the purpose and meaning of capabilities and how they can be developed using KCs (Hipkins, 2017).The shift in focus from KCs to capabilities captures the increased complexity of more recent thinking about ‘weaving’. In NZCER’s Phase 3, ‘capabilities’ were re-defined to describe the learning outcomes of students practising KCs.Capabilities are developed from weaving together one or more KCs with learning area content. The capabilities approach recognises that the K...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/the-key-competencies-realising-the-potential-of-the-new-zealand-curriculum/appendix-3-developing-capabilities-using-key-competencies/

  16. Introduction

    Factors both inside and outside of school contribute to lower student engagement at school. Students from low income communities often face more barriers to learning than students from high income communities.National data on students’ achievement and engagement1 show that students in the lowest quintile2 schools are more likely to have poorer achievement levels and to be stood-down than students in the highest quintile schools. 3 Over 80 percent of all stand‑downs, suspensions and exclus...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/introduction/

  17. McAuley High School, Auckland

    BackgroundMcAuley High School is a decile 1, Catholic, integrated secondary school for girls, located in Otahuhu, South Auckland. Eighty-eight percent of the roll of 688 students are Pacific students. In keeping with the ethos of the Sisters of Mercy, McAuley High School aims to provide an education that enables young people to rise above the barriers of poverty and to achieve to their potential regardless of their background.The tone in the school is respectful and purposeful. The girls achieve...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/mcauley-high-school-auckland/

  18. Overview

    Links between schools in lower income areas and high rates of suspensions and stand‑downs1 with poorer academic results2 are evident in New Zealand. In keeping with international data, stand-down and suspension rates drop and achievement rises as the school decile rises.3Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)4 reporting recognises that many New Zealand students achieve well academically. However, there remains considerable disparity between the highest and lowest achi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/overview/

  19. Methodology

    The overarching question for this national evaluation was ‘to what extent do schools promote and respond to student wellbeing?’The evaluation involved 159 primary schools that had an education review in Term 1, 2014. The type of school, roll size and location (urban or rural) are shown in Appendix 2.ERO’s judgement 1 for each school was linked to ERO’s Wellbeing for Success: Draft Evaluation Indicators for Student Wellbeing(draft) 2013 2 and based on the: implementation of processes t...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-childrens-success-at-primary-school/introduction-2/