Results for "ako"

Displaying Page 5 of 5

  1. Conclusion

    Early learning success depends on children knowing where they come from, understanding how they learn, drawing on their interests and respecting their achievements. The cluster review of these immersion and kaupapa Māori early childhood centres highlights what contributes to early learning success. Where tikanga Māori, culture and identity, meaningful and loving relationships, language learning strategies, learning environments and learning expectations are strong, then children will: be confi...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/tuia-te-here-tangata-making-meaningful-connections/conclusion/

  2. Appendix One: Phase two investigative framework

    Evaluative Questions Investigative Prompts Data Gathering Ako Panuku vision To what extent do schools and teachers recognise the AP vision of “the ‘unique’ contribution as Māori to RMSA”? What do you know about the vision of Ako Panuku? How well is the vision for AP realised in your school? To what extent did the vision of AP influence your decision to be involved in the programme? Conversations with: Individual Māori teachers students school leaders/managers whānau...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/ako-panuku-an-evaluation-of-the-programmes-effectiveness/appendix-one-phase-two-investigative-framework/

  3. Naenae College, Lower Hutt

    BackgroundNaenae College is a decile 2, co-educational secondary school, located in Lower Hutt. The roll is nearly 750 and is ethnically diverse, including more than 40 different nationalities. Māori students make up 31 percent of the school roll and 22 percent of the roll are Pacific students.Te Whānau Tahi and timetablingIn 2007, a new principal was appointed and a new board of trustees elected, taking over from two statutory managers, appointed by the Ministry in 2004 and 2005. There remain...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/towards-equitable-outcomes-in-secondary-schools-good-practice/naenae-college-lower-hutt/

  4. Purpose and focus

    High performing Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako are characterised by their clear purpose and focus. The starting point for this clarity is effective internal evaluation at both the individual member and community levels. Analysis of student achievement data and investigation of practice leads to the identification of issues that provide a basis for shared purpose and direction. … a common goal has to be at the same time inspiring and measurable … goals without a link to outcomes are mea...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/purpose-and-focus/

  5. Appendix 4: Glossary

    Te Reo Māori English meaning Ako Both children and adults are learners and teachers Haka Māori ceremonial dance Hapū Subtribe, kinship group Hui forum for discussion which is underpinned by Māori values Iwi Wider kinship group Kai Food, to eat Karakia Prayer, grace, incantations Kaumātua Adult elder (usually male) Kuia Adult elder (female) Manaakitanga kindness, caring Marae Tribal gathering place where ceremonial events are held and issues are...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services/appendix-4-glossary/

  6. Sufficiency of resourcing and supportive infrastructure

    Coordination of resources and the provision of a supportive infrastructure are critical leadership responsibilities in a Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako. While the operational activities of communities need appropriate resourcing, the resources that matter most are those that create the conditions for effective collaboration. Above all, collaboration needs to be resourced with time.It takes expert leadership and facilitation skills to develop trust relationships in a group of self-managing...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/sufficiency-of-resourcing-and-supportive-infrastructure/

  7. Improving learner outcomes

    The research on the power of collaborative cultures to get results has been accumulating over 40 years. It points to the power of social capital – the agency and impact of strong and effective groups – to improve student learning.28 In the context of the Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako initiative, the primary purpose of collaboration is to improve student outcomes. To achieve equitable outcomes for those who have been under-served by the system, particularly Māori and Pacific students...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/communities-of-learning-kahui-ako-collaboration-to-improve-learner-outcomes/improving-learner-outcomes/