Jean Batten School

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Education institution number:
1322
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
322
Telephone:
Address:

6 Imrie Avenue, Mangere, Auckland

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Summary

Jean Batten School has a roll of 449 children, 14 percent identify as Māori, 31 percent Samoan, 19 percent Tongan, 13 percent Cook Islands Māori and 12 percent Fijian. The diversity of the school roll has increased over the last three years, and many children have home languages other than English.

Since ERO’s 2014 review, the school has experienced significant staffing changes. The board appointed a new principal in 2017 and a deputy principal in 2016. New trustees have joined the board and a new board chair was elected in 2016. There is a large number of recently appointed staff in the school, including a number of beginning teachers.

Children benefit from a settled and positive school environment. The school's active promotion of and support for children and their families’ wellbeing impacts positively on their engagement.

The school’s 2016 public achievement information shows that approximately 60 percent of all children are achieving the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. This is a 10 percent decline compared with the school’s 2015 achievement data.

The board has goals and plans to promote children’s learning. Recent initiatives, including significant teacher development, have yet to provide evidence of a positive impact on student learning.

Jean Batten School is one of 11 schools in the Mangere North Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). The CoL is at the early stage of setting achievement targets.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Jean Batten School is becoming effective in achieving equitable outcomes for all children.

The school is developing approaches to better respond to Māori children and others whose learning and achievement need acceleration. School leaders and teachers place children who need to make accelerated progress at the forefront of their interventions for equity and excellence.

Initiatives which are beginning to contribute to achieving equity and excellence for all children include the:

  • Mutukaroa programme which promotes successful transitions into the school for new entrants and their families and whānau
  • improvement of teacher appraisal systems and processes
  • well-resourced learning support programme and networks with external agencies.

At the time of this review the new principal has identified that a more urgent and relentless focus on improving the achievement and progress of all learners is a key priority. The school has the capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children and address the disparity in achievement between Māori and Pacific learners.

Agreed next steps include:

  • developing and documenting a more connected, thinking curriculum for the Jean Batten learner

  • strengthening the educational leadership roles of senior and middle leaders to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s progress

  • increasing children’s role in managing their own learning

  • improving the use of internal evaluation to guide and affirm the school’s direction.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Jean Batten School is partially effective in responding to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The board of trustees, senior leaders and staff prioritise and resource individual children who are at risk of not achieving.

The school’s 2016 achievement information shows that approximately 60 percent of all children are achieving the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. This is a ten percent decline compared to the school’s 2015 achievement data.

Of concern are the declining levels of achievement for Māori children and the resulting disparity evident between Māori and Pacific children’s achievement. Approximately half of all Māori children in 2016 did not achieve the National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics. Pacific children’s achievement also declined in 2016, by approximately ten percent in reading and writing.

Children who need to make accelerated progress participate in a range of additional, well-resourced programmes to support their learning. School leaders need to evaluate the effectiveness of these programmes and the impact they have on improving outcomes for these learners.

The National Standards achievement information shows the need to develop improvement plans with specific targets, goals and actions to accelerate children’s progress. School leaders and teachers need to develop a shared understanding of accelerated progress and introduce effective teaching practices that result in accelerated learning to enable all children to achieve equitable outcomes.

The school’s assessment and moderation processes are developing. To increase the reliability of teacher judgements, senior leaders should seek the support of a Ministry of Education Student Achievement Function Practitioner (SAF).

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has some goodsystems, processes and practices in place that support equity and excellence for learners. The principal is an experienced curriculum leader. She demonstrates capability to lead change in teaching and learning to improve outcomes for children.

Children experience a range of learning opportunities that draw on their strengths and interests. They participate enthusiastically in cultural and performing arts activities. Older children have good opportunities for leadership.

Teachers place a high value on knowing their learners well. This has led to increased learning-focused relationships with children and their families and whānau. Children experience positive, caring relationships with teachers.

Parents appreciate the welcoming approach of the school and their experience through the Mutukaroa initiative. They value the learning opportunities to be more informed about how they can take a shared role to improve their children’s achievement.

School leaders have improved performance management systems. Appraisal processes encourage teachers to inquire into the impact of their teaching. Increasingly, they are reflecting on how they can improve outcomes for children and share effective practices with other teachers.

The principal and trustees are undertaking a significant internal evaluation of the school’s vision and values. In consultation with students, staff and the school community they plan to set a future direction for school improvement. The principal clearly understands that a well-understood commitment and approach to accelerating children’s learning is needed.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Trustees and school leaders have identified the need to develop their collective capacity to use internal evaluation to develop and sustain school improvements. They agree that next steps for school development include:

  • developing and documenting a more connected, thinking curriculum for the Jean Batten learner

  • strengthening the educational leadership roles of senior and middle leaders to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s progress

  • increasing children’s role in managing their own learning

  • improving the use of internal evaluation to guide and affirm the school’s direction.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to health and safety. In order to address this the board must:

  • consult at least once in every 2 years with the school community and adopt a statement on the delivery of its health curriculum
    Section 60B of the Education Act, 1989.

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • ensure that police vetting of all non-teaching staff is carried out every 3 years
  • develop an annual performance agreement with the principal
  • document and implement an induction programme for all new teachers.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school is now better placed to accelerate the achievement of children who need it.

Leaders and teachers are capable of developing the capacity to accelerate learning for all children, particularly that of Māori children whose achievement is below that of other groups.

The principal has identified the need to develop a cohesive direction for improvement through a learner -focused plan targeted to strengthen teaching and leadership practices and improve outcomes for children.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child
  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement.
  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Recommendations

ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education consider providing a Student Achievement Function Practitioner (SAF) to support for the school in order to bring about improvements in assessment systems and processes and strengthen teachers’ and leaders’ assessment capability.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

14 July 2017

About the school 

Location

Mangere, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1322

School type

Contributing

School roll

449

Gender composition

Boys 51% Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Tongan
Cook Islands Māori
Fijian/Fijian Indian
Indian
Niue o
ther

14%
2%
31%
19%
13%
12%
2%
2%
5%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

14 July 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

May 2014
June 2011
February 2008

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Jean Batten School is located in Mangere, Auckland. The school caters for students in Years 1 to 6 and serves an ethnically diverse community, with most students of Māori or Pacific heritage. Teachers and students share a sense of pride in their school.

The principal and senior leaders provide effective professional leadership and management. They continue their focus on improving teaching and learning. Since the previous ERO review in 2011, there have been a number of changes in school staffing. A new appointment to the leadership team brings curriculum expertise to the school. Several new teachers, including beginning teachers, have also joined the staff. Leadership appointments in literacy, mathematics and the arts aim to support the sustainability of changes made through ongoing school-wide professional development.

The board of trustees, led by a new board chair, has acknowledged the need to undertake training to better understand governance roles and responsibilities. A range of new initiatives focused on involving parents and whānau in their children’s learning are in place for 2014. These initiatives should increase community involvement in the school.

ERO’s 2011 review noted a culture focused on improving student learning and achievement. This culture has been sustained and further developed. Significant progress has been made in the areas that were identified for development in the 2011 report. The board, principal, senior leaders and teachers have continued to place a deliberate focus on raising student achievement, and this has produced positive changes in learning outcomes for students. The involvement of external advisors has also contributed to the school’s development. School leaders agree that further inquiry into practice would help them in their ongoing focus on improvement.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Student achievement information is generally well used by staff to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. School leaders use data to set priorities, identify learning and development, and make resourcing decisions.

The school has continued to collate and analyse student achievement information in reading, writing and mathematics. Syndicate coordinators and teachers use assessment data to place students in classes and to group students for instruction. Some teachers use the analysis assessment information to guide specific and focused teaching.

The school’s data about achievement in relation to National Standards suggests that all students, including Māori and Pacific students, continue to achieve particularly well in reading compared with other local schools and with national achievement levels. Mathematics achievement reflects progress for some students, particularly for Māori. This year the school is implementing a school-wide focus on improving student achievement in writing which should help lift achievement in this area. Senior leaders report that their overall teacher judgements and practices for moderating assessment information help to ensure that school data are reliable.

Teachers have begun to inquire into the effectiveness of their teaching practices. They trial and use strategies and programmes aimed at raising the achievement of their targeted students. A next step identified by the school is to continue to further evaluate student data to promote more innovative approaches and programmes aimed at accelerating student progress in other curriculum areas. This work may also involve a deeper analysis of student needs for those currently achieving at levels below and well below the National Standards.

Student assessment portfolios supplement the school’s assessment and reporting procedures for National Standards. These portfolios provide students and parents with a comprehensive record of student learning and progress across the curriculum. Some student self assessments are included in these portfolios.

The school has a large number of students who are English as second language learners and, consequently, teachers plan to use the English Language Learning Progressions (ELLP) to track their progress. This will enable teachers to better support these students with English language learning while valuing their capability in their home language.

School leaders continue to make positive changes to learning outcomes for students. They are planning to review the concept of student engagement and explore the provision of deeper learning challenges for their students.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Some aspects of the school’s curriculum promote and support student learning particularly well. Students respond positively to the range of different learning opportunities they receive, including those linked to school sports, swimming, the cultural festival and school production.

The school’s curriculum has a clear emphasis on literacy and mathematics. Classrooms are settled environments and students are appropriately focused on their learning. They have opportunities for inquiry learning through different curriculum themes and a range of authentic contexts. Solo Taxonomy strategies are used by some teachers to help support students' understanding of their learning.

Considerable emphasis has been placed on involving parents and whānau in their children’s learning. Home-school partnership meetings with parents and programmes, including Mutukaroa, Reading Together and a summer reading programme, are extending the school’s learning partnerships with the community. These are new initiatives and it is too early to assess their impact on promoting and supporting student learning.

School leaders and teachers work together effectively with students, whānau and external agencies to support student learning and wellbeing. The school has good pastoral systems and social care programmes. Senior leaders agree it would now be useful to develop a greater inquiry focus in work linked to ensuring the school effectively promotes and responds to wellbeing matters for students and staff.

While the above good features are evident, the school’s curriculum overall would benefit from further development to promote and support student learning and wellbeing. School leaders have identified future priorities in this area. These include continuing to give learners more voice, choice and ownership of learning. They also agree to continue developments towards establishing a more bi-cultural curriculum.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students make good progress in their learning at Jean Batten School and generally achieve well overall. They take leadership roles in kapa haka performance, pōwhiri and assemblies. Māori staff mentor students to promote a sense of pride and success in being Māori.

Whānau views and perspectives are sought by the school leadership team to further enhance educational outcomes for Māori learners.

Senior leaders are planning new initiatives for the enrichment class for many of the Year 4 to 5 Māori students. A staff member has been newly appointed to further enrich tikanga Māori, waiata, and the use of authentic Māori contexts for learning in this class. Māori students at other year levels learn in mainstream classes.

School leaders, the board of trustees and staff are also considering ways they could respond more directly to the language, culture and identity of the school’s Māori students. They plan to use Ka Hikitia, the Ministry of Education’s Māori education strategy, as a tool for reviewing, planning and improving school strategies in this important area of their responsibilities.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve the school’s performance.

The principal and the senior leadership team are committed to continuing to raise student achievement and provide an environment the supports student wellbeing. They have implemented improvement focused processes which include:

  • an emphasis on children as successful learners
  • strategic appointments
  • ongoing school-wide professional development
  • leadership roles to sustain new learning
  • new initiatives to promote and improve community partnerships.

Trustees bring a variety of skills and expertise to their roles. They should now seek to become more proactive in their governance of the school. They should undertake training and develop improved processes for knowing about and implementing good practice in school governance. This would support the strategic direction of the school.

To further support sustainability and improvement the senior leadership team agree to develop greater levels of critical reflection, self review and monitoring processes, including those related to staff appraisals. Increasing and reflecting the community, staff and student voice in development planning and school review processes would enhance and sustain the school’s focus on improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

16 May 2014

About the School

Location

Mangere, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

1322

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

424

Gender composition

Girls 53%

Boys 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

Tongan

Cook Island Māori

Fijian

Indian

Niue

African

other Asian

other Pacific

other

14%

2%

36%

17%

13%

6%

4%

3%

1%

1%

1%

2%

Special Features

Māori Enrichment Class ( Year 4 to 5)

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

16 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2011

February 2008

February 2005