Wairere School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Education institution number:
2075
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
46
Telephone:
Address:

Wardville Road, Wardville, Waharoa

View on map

School Context

Wairere School is located in the rural Waikato district of Wardville, north east of Waharoa. It provides education for students in Years 1 to 6. The current roll of 47 includes 17 Māori and 12 Filipino students.

The school’s mission is for ‘quality education in a caring environment’. Values of teamwork, caring, responsibility, respect, honesty, consideration and positivity are promoted. The school has strategic goals for raising achievement levels of at-risk learners in reading, writing, mathematics. 

The school is part of the Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako, Matamata. Since ERO’s last review in 2015 there have been several changes to the teaching team and a number of school trustees are new. In 2017/2018 professional learning and development is focused on learning languages, including te reo Māori, and students leading their own learning.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics
  • literacy support programmes.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is working towards achieving equitable outcomes for its students. School achievement data for 2017 shows that most students achieved at expected levels in reading and mathematics and the large majority achieved at expected levels in writing. The school’s achievement information from 2015 to 2017 showed a trend of improved results for all students, including Māori, in reading and mathematics. However in writing, achievement for all students remained at similar levels over these three years, with some decrease in achievement of girls.

There is some disparity in achievement levels within the school. Māori students are achieving less well than other groups in writing and mathematics. Boys are achieving at lower levels than girls in reading, writing and mathematics.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is effectively accelerating progress for some Māori and other students in reading. School data for 2016 shows that all students targeted for additional literacy support made accelerated progress. In 2017, students who participated in this programme made expected progress and some accelerated their learning. School leaders have yet to track the accelerated progress of at-risk students in writing and mathematics.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Students participate and learn in a caring and inclusive environment. School values are well established and highly evident across the school. They are well understood by students, staff and parents. Students with additional learning needs are well supported to access the curriculum alongside their peers. Students demonstrate a strong sense of belonging that is fostered in this small family-like setting, conducive to students’ wellbeing and learning.

The curriculum offers breadth of opportunities across all learning areas. Teachers use a range of strategies and authentic contexts that respond to individual needs and interests.

Leadership promotes relational trust at all levels and professional collaboration. The principal and teachers actively participate in the local kāhui ako. They are open to learning and engage in available professional learning and development, taking a collective approach to improving teaching strategies and learner outcomes.

Teachers are actively seeking ways to build positive partnerships with the school’s Māori community. Te reo and tikanga Māori are evident and developing throughout the school. The school is at an early stage of realising its vision for te reo me ōna tikanga Māori.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Teaching practice focused on student agency needs further development. Assessment for learning practices, including the use of learning progressions for literacy and mathematics need to be implemented. This should enable students to understand their own learning and what they need to progress.

The management and use of student achievement information needs strengthening. The board, principal and teachers need to make better use of achievement information to identify patterns and trends in achievement and monitor and track rates of progress for at-risk learners in relation to school targets. More effective analysis of school-wide data would better inform internal evaluation of strategies and programmes to ascertain what is most successful for accelerating progress and achievement.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • shared values that underpin the school’s curriculum and relationships
  • leaders’ and teachers’ openness to learning that allows them to reflect on and improve their practice.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • effective analysis and use of school-wide achievement information to strengthen internal evaluation
  • teacher knowledge and capability to improve students’ understanding and ownership of their learning
  • internal evaluation processes and practices
    [ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop for trustees and senior leaders.]

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Adrienne Fowler
Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

9 October 2018

About the school 

Location

Wardville, Waikato

Ministry of Education profile number

2075

School type

Contributing Primary School Years 1-6

School roll

47

Gender composition

Boys      31
Girls       16

Ethnic composition

Māori                                    17
Pākehā                                  17
Filipino                                  12
Other European                       1

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

No

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

9 October 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review            February 2015
Education Review            January 2012

 

Findings

The Wairere School curriculum provides students with opportunities to learn about their local environment. Parents and whānau actively participate in their children’s learning and school programmes. Trustees, the principal and staff have made good use of professional development to improve, assessment and sustainability.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Wairere School is a small, rural contributing primary school catering for students in Years 1 to 6. It is located near Waharoa, north of Matamata. It has a roll of 49 students of whom 14 identify as Māori and 11 who are Filipino children from the local farming community.

Since the last ERO review, a new board chair has been appointed. The board has undertaken significant trustee training to improve their knowledge of governance matters, and financial management practices have been reviewed and strengthened. The current principal was appointed in 2012 and teaching staff has remained constant. The board has continued to fund an additional teacher. A special feature of the school is the small-class sizes and a strong focus on student well being.

The school’s van provides a service to the community. It is used to transport most students attending the school, and for excursions such as sporting and cultural events.

Students, staff and parents take great pride in, and responsibility for, maintaining a safe and attractive learning environment. They have strong respectful relationships and there is a high level of community support for the school. Traditional events are valued and well attended by the wider community. ‘Friends of Wairere’ is a proactive community group that works closely with the board and co-ordinates fundraising events.

Teachers are committed to on-going professional learning and development to improve their practice. Throughout 2013/14 they have been involved in a local school cluster development focused on effective teaching in writing. The principal’s strong knowledge in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance teaching and learning is impacting positively on the school’s curriculum, and is an area of on going development for teachers.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes effective use of student achievement information to promote learning. Teachers gather information from a range of sources, including standardised tests as well as their day-to-day observations. Ongoing professional development for teachers about assessment, and the involvement in moderation practices with other schools, is increasing the quality of teacher’s overall judgements about student achievement and progress in relation to National Standards.

The board receives regular reports from the principal about achievement and progress throughout the year. This information helps the board to make well considered decisions about future resource allocations and school development. The principal advises the board on achievement targets, as part of the annual planning process, for those students below expectation. The progress of these students is closely monitored.

Parents are kept well informed about their children’s progress and achievement. Teachers provide both informal and formal opportunities to meet and discuss their children’s learning. Individual achievement portfolios provide a wide range of rich information about children’s involvement in the school’s curriculum. The principal has recently initiated a review on the reporting process to parents. This is timely and should ensure a more explicit process for reporting progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

The schools achievement information at the end of 2013 indicated that most students were achieving the expected National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics. A significant proportion of students are working below the standard and are receiving additional learning support.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The well-documented curriculum promotes and supports student learning. There are clear guidelines for teachers for the provision of programmes in all subjects. The agreed vision and values align closely with the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum. Teachers have good curriculum knowledge and plan programmes of work to meet the identified needs of students.

Teachers are continuing to benefit from professional development about the teaching and learning of writing. The principal and teachers believe that increased student voice and opportunities to achieve success in writing are leading to higher levels of student engagement and achievement.

The use of ICT as a tool for learning is a focus in the school. As part of the annual plan for 2014, there is an expectation that teachers will plan for the use of ICT in daily literacy, mathematics and inquiry programmes. Students access these tools and this motivates and engages them in learning.

As part of the appraisal process teachers are inquiring into their practice, and these inquiries are closely aligned to the school’s annual goals about raising achievement in literacy and mathematics. This is providing opportunities for teachers to reflect and have professional dialogue with their colleagues.

The principal and teachers are committed to ongoing review of the curriculum to ensure its relevance for students. The principal, in discussion with ERO, has recognised that there would now be benefit in developing a shared philosophy for learning and teaching with all teaching staff. This process should enable them to identify agreed best practice and expectations for teaching and learning to improve outcomes for all students.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Te reo Māori is celebrated through a school te reo blog and is used by teachers incidentally throughout the day. Māori tikanga and beliefs are recognised in the school including karakia to begin and end the day.

The board, principal and staff continue to seek guidance from members of the Māori community and plans for a local whānau to tutor a school kapa haka group.

Further investigation of Māori preferred ways of teaching and learning is likely to strengthen Māori student engagement and achievement.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed because:

  • the board is providing effective governance
  • the principal is knowledgeable in curriculum and has expertise in effective teaching in learning, and has developed and is committed to maintaining respectful relationships in the community
  • there is a continual focus on raising student achievement
  • there is a safe and inclusive school culture
  • the board and staff are actively engaged with the school community
  • staff and board are committed to ongoing training and professional development
  • there is a strong sense of pride and belonging by all stakeholders.

In order to continually improve its performance the board and principal have agreed to focus on:

  • continuing development of self-review processes and procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives and programmes
  • developing an agreed philosophy about best practice for teaching and learning.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The Wairere School curriculum provides students with opportunities to learn about their local environment. Parents and whānau actively participate in their children’s learning and school programmes. Trustees, the principal and staff have made good use of professional development to improve, assessment and sustainability.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

11 February 2015

About the School

Location

North of Matamata

Ministry of Education profile number

2075

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

49

Gender composition

Boys 26

Girls 23

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

South East Asian-Filipino

24

14

11

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

11 February 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

January 2012

February 2009

February 2006