Riverdale School (P North)

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Education institution number:
2437
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
330
Telephone:
Address:

95 Slacks Road, Awapuni, Palmerston North

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School Context

Riverdale School, in Palmerston North, has children from Years 1 to 6. The Riverdale School community represents a range of ethnicities. At the time of this review, 21% of students attending are Māori and 12 are of Pacific heritage.

The school’s vision statement, ‘Empowering successful inquiring learners’ is underpinned by the school’s Ngā Matapono - ‘confident, creative, effective communicator and self- managing’. This set of guiding beliefs and attitudes is seen as important for each child to have so they succeed at school and in the future.

The 2018 strategic plan prioritises on-going improvement in student achievement in reading and mathematics, with a focus on those at risk of underachievement.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics at mid-year and end-of-year in relation to the New Zealand Curriculum
  • progress in relation to the annual targets
  • engagement and wellbeing
  • valued outcomes in the schools localised curriculum as defined by the school’s Ngā Matapono.

The major areas of focus in 2018 for leaders’ and teachers’ professional learning and development includes writing and mathematics development. Since the July 2014 ERO report, the school has further extended its flexible learning and teaching spaces pedagogy across the school. 

Evaluation Findings

Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school achieves very good achievement outcomes for students. Since the previous ERO report, the school has maintained high levels of achievement in reading, writing and mathematics for students.

Most students achieve well, with over half of all learners achieving above curriculum expectations in reading and a third above in mathematics at the end of 2017.

Mid-year data shows the school is on track to maintain similar outcomes for 2018.

The achievement of Māori and Pacific children is appropriately tracked and monitored. Students achieve well with any disparities suitably identified and addressed. Trends over time indicate most students, including Māori and Pacific learners, achieve at or above achievement expectations in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6. 

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

Robust processes are soundly implemented to identify, monitor and suitably respond to needs of students.

Comprehensive systems and practices support equitable outcomes for students requiring additional support or those identified with complex learning needs. A strong focus is apparent on responding positively to student wellbeing.

Of the few students identified at risk of underachieving in their learning, many make progress, with some showing acceleration.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The kaupapa, common vision for, and focus on the potential of learners is reflected in the embedded mahi tahi, unity, of the school leadership. There are established goals and expectations for teachers and leaders with a relentless focus on ensuring excellence and equity for all students. School processes and practices effectively promote students’ wellbeing, engagement and achievement. School leaders ensure evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building is coherent, systematic and is used to purposefully promote innovation and improvement for student’s learning.

Manaakitanga, a culture of care, is strongly reflected in the inclusive, responsive, highly collaborative learning spaces and where mauri tau (harmony and balance) is promoted. Self-management practices and student choice strategies are strongly evident. Students have opportunity to learn and experience the breadth of curriculum through effective integration. The curriculum provides a range of authentic contexts to foster the culture, language and identity of Māori learners.

For those students identified with more complex learning needs, effective individual plans are collaboratively developed. Progress towards achieving these goals is suitably monitored, tracked and responded to by appropriate staffing and external agencies.

The documented curriculum provides explicit and specific guidance for teachers. Teaching clearly reflects the school beliefs and is aligned to the vision for learning. There is a strong and deliberate focus on building knowledge and skills that promote learning for now and in the future. Students are involved in a range of enrichment opportunities provided through cluster and community connections. Student leadership is promoted and contributes positively to the school culture.

The school environments value and suitably include Māori culture, language and identity. There are clearly planned actions tailored to promote and value te ao Māori across the curriculum and meet whānau aspirations for their children.

Leadership processes and practices encourage, strengthen and sustain professional learning and collaboration to improve teaching and promote student outcomes in achievement, engagement and wellbeing. There is a strong commitment to grow leadership capability. An improvement focused and highly reflective appraisal system includes opportunities for teachers and leaders to share their practice and learn from their peers.

A range of appropriate communication strategies and tools are used to engage and support whānau and families in their child’s learning. Parents and whānau are welcomed and involved in school activities and experiences. Relationships between students and their whānau and the school are clearly valued. The school identifies and draws on community expertise and resources to support students and their families. Comprehensive individual transition plans for children in, through and out of the school are appropriately developed and implemented.

The board of trustees bring a variety of skills to their stewardship role. They have undertaken training and provide competent oversight of school operation. There is a strong focus on resourcing the school to maximise student outcomes. Trustees demonstrate an embedded culture of review and evaluation. They perform their dual roles of accountability and improvement with clarity and rigour. Reports to the board support trustees to explore, scrutinise and deepen their knowledge of specific groups’ achievement within the school.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leadership has begun to consider ways to more systematically report to the board in relation to progress towards the board’s targets in the annual plan. Simplifying the focus on the acceleration of this small group of students should provide clearer knowledge about the actions taken and their success. 

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • leadership processes and practices that promote, strengthen and sustain professional learning and collaboration to improve teaching and learning
  • a rich curriculum, effective teaching practices and learning environments that are successfully developed to enable increased student collaboration, participation and engagement
  • internal review, evaluation and inquiry that meaningfully contributes to ongoing school improvement and contributes to success for Māori. 

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • revising and strengthening current annual achievement targets to more clearly focus on those students in need of acceleration.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services
Central Region

19 February 2019

About the school 

Location

Palmerston North

Ministry of Education profile number

2437

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

429

Gender composition

Male 55%, Female 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori                                  21%
Pākehā                               66%
Pacific                                    1%
Other ethnic groups             12%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

Yes

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

November 2018

Date of this report

19 February 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, July 2014
Education Review, February 2010
Education Review, August 2007

Findings

The Riverdale School curriculum supports the vision for ‘empowering successful, inquiring learners’. Students participate confidently and positively in learning. Meaningful engagement with te ao Māori supports Māori learners and their families. Effective leadership and governance promote learning and progress. A reflective, improvement-focused culture is evident throughout the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Riverdale School in Palmerston North caters for Years 1 to 6 students. Of the roll of 356 students, 21% identify as Māori and 2% are Pacific.

Since the 2010 ERO review, leadership has been restructured and classes have been reorganised. Renaming areas of the school has occurred in consultation with Māori and the community. A separate class continues to support students with high or complex learning needs.

Professional learning and development supports the inquiry and development of the curriculum and its vision for self-directed learners. Partnerships with parents and the wider community are valued and promoted.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses student achievement information effectively to promote achievement and progress for learners. There are high expectations for all students to achieve well. Cohesive schoolwide practices support a sustained focus on learning and progress.

There are clear expectations and good support for teachers to gather, analyse and respond appropriately to assessment information. Teachers regularly monitor progress for all learners to set and review targets, and to collaboratively explore strategies to promote improved outcomes. They regularly review and report on students’ progress in relation to introduced strategies.

School leaders promote their vision of educational success for all. They work in a coordinated way to develop a schoolwide overview of achievement and promote accelerated progress for students. Good processes are in place for sharing useful and timely student achievement information with the board.

Data shows that nearly all students are at and above National Standards in reading and mathematics, with increased numbers of students achieving above. Writing data for 2013 shows improved levels of achievement. This continues to be an appropriate focus for development. Māori and Pacific students achieve well in literacy and mathematics. Data shows some students make significant progress in their learning.

There is a well-considered approach to provision of programmes and support for students with identified special education needs. Students with high or complex needs are appropriately catered for and well integrated into school life. Comprehensive systems are in place for teachers and families to share information about the learning needs and progress of students. A range of practices promote student involvement in assessment and learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Ongoing review ensures the curriculum reflects the school’s vision for ‘empowering successful, inquiring learners’. A focus on creating conditions to support learning helps build a community of learners where students and teachers can explore, share and develop.

Students are motivated to participate confidently and positively in learning. Good quality teaching practices are evident. Useful structures and prompts, ‘te ako ritenga’ (the inquiry learning process) and integrated use of digital learning technologies support students’ learning and thinking. Students are encouraged to reflect on and make decisions about aspects of their learning. Respectful relationships are evident. Key competencies and values are promoted through ‘Ngā Mātāpono’.

Leaders communicate clear expectations for teaching and learning. This promotes consistency of practice across the school. A range of systems and processes helps build shared understandings of effective practice. This includes teaching as inquiry, professional learning opportunities and appraisal. Teachers work together to grow and develop their practice and improve outcomes for students. The school is exploring ways to support students' self-directed learning through flexible spaces and a collaborative teaching model.

Teachers include elements of Pacific cultures in learning contexts. Leaders acknowledge that a key next step is to investigate how to strengthen the curriculum to ensure the identity, language and culture of Pacific students and their aiga are affirmed.

Transition to school has been reviewed and strengthened to promote whānau connections and a sense of belonging. Processes are flexible and responsive to meet the needs of students and families.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

There has been a deliberate, strategic approach to increasing teachers’ capacity in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori to better support Māori learners. Teachers work regularly with external expertise to develop confidence and understanding in kaupapa Māori.

Action plans, developed in consultation with whānau Māori, guide development. Meaningful engagement and sustained development is evident. This is well supported by external and internal expertise. Strengthened links with iwi and marae provide rich opportunities for Māori students to learn about and be affirmed in their identity and culture. Connections and expressions of te ao Māori are evident within the environment.

School leaders recognise a next step is to develop and embed culturally responsive classroom practice. A clearly articulated vision for success as Māori should guide development and review.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. There is a well-considered, strategic approach to change. Well-aligned, sustainable systems help to promote and maintain improvement.

A reflective, improvement-focused culture is evident throughout the school. Learning is valued and modelled by teachers. Leadership development is well supported at all levels. School leaders work as a collaborative, cohesive team. The strengths of staff are recognised, valued and supported. Positive relationships are promoted and evident.

Trustees appropriately support the school’s priorities and resource initiatives. They inquire into the effectiveness of the school’s endeavours through data and reports. Student achievement is a focus. Most board members are new to their role. They demonstrate good understanding of their governance responsibilities and actively seek to improve their knowledge.

Self review and strategic planning informs decision-making and leads to ongoing improvement for students. A planned review of the self review framework should enhance the process. The framework ensure measures of success are clearly established and promote the use of a range of relevant sources of evidence in judging effectiveness.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The Riverdale School curriculum supports the vision for ‘empowering successful, inquiring learners’. Students participate confidently and positively in learning. Meaningful engagement with te ao Māori supports Māori learners and their families. Effective leadership and governance promote learning and progress. A reflective, improvement-focused culture is evident throughout the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

4 July 2014

About the School

Location

Palmerston North

Ministry of Education profile number

2437

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

356

Gender composition

Female 51%, Male 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/ Pākehā

Asian

Pacific

Other ethnic groups

21%

67%

6%

2%

4%

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

4 July 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Supplementary Review

February 2010

August 2007

November 2005