Crofton Downs Primary School

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Summary

Crofton Downs Primary School caters for students in Years 1 to 6. Pākehā children make up approximately 72% of the 257 students on the roll. Asian students are the next largest group at 17%. Māori children comprise 8% and there is a smaller group of Pacific learners.

Significant staffing changes since the June 2014 ERO report. These include a new member of the leadership team and a large number of new teaching staff. Teachers in the junior pod are all new to the school this year. The school’s roll has increased since previous ERO review. The Board of Trustees is made up of a group of experienced and new representatives.

Teaching staff have had professional learning and development opportunities, including Ministry of Education (MoE) initiatives, Accelerating Literacy Learning (ALL) and Accelerating learning in Mathematics (ALiM).

There has been a purposeful response to the areas for improvement identified in the previous ERO report. A refresh of the school’s values and vision has been carried out in consultation with families, resulting in changes to teaching and learning.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Leaders continue to strengthen practices to achieve equitable achievement outcomes for all students. The school’s analysed assessment information shows most students, including Māori, achieve very well in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6. There is disparity in mathematics and writing achievement for boys and Māori being over represented in the non-achieving groups. Leaders continue to focus on improving outcomes for learners in writing.

The culture of the school is inclusive and welcoming. Students’ and families’ aspirations are recognised and respected, contributing positively to children’s wellbeing, engagement and learning.

Further development of school systems has resulted in better identification of learners at risk of underachievement. Children’s progress and achievement are well monitored and outcomes are reported to families and trustees.

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds very well to those Māori and other children whose progress and achievement need acceleration. A wide range of data and information is collected and scrutinised by leaders. This information is used well to identify learners requiring acceleration, and those who would benefit from additional support. Leader and teachers:

  • have regular collaborative discussion suitably focused on promoting student progress and wellbeing

  • identify additional support, including the provision of teacher aides, to assist students with high learning needs.

Structured internal and external moderation for writing is well planned. Leaders recognise continuing to develop and enhance these practices as worthwhile. School processes and expectations assist teachers to make judgements against the National Standards in all three areas.

The school is considering the use of assessment tools such as The Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT) and Learning Progressions Framework. ERO’s evaluation affirms that the use of such tools should assist leaders and teachers to further improve assessment practice and the dependability of teacher judgements.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The culture of the school is inclusive and welcoming. Establishing educational relationships with families and the wider community are valued. Students’ and families’ aspirations are recognised and respected. This contributes positively to children’s wellbeing, engagement and learning. Improvement has been made in responding to Māori learners’ culture, language and identities.

A positive tone is evident in the school. Relationships amongst school staff and students are respectful and reciprocal. Children are engaged and purposefully involved in learning activities.

Digital learning options provided support engagement and extend the scope of children’s learning.The school’s vision and values express high expectations for children to lead their own learning, achieve well and have a strong sense of wellbeing. Curriculum development and renovations to physical learning spaces support teaching practice to promote and enact the school’s vision.

The board and leaders actively seek the views of children and the school community. Strategic goals reflect school priorities. Annual planning identifies actions focused on achieving the school’s desired outcomes.

Appropriate professional learning and inquiry assists the new teaching teams to build knowledge of the school’s curriculum and its approach to teaching and learning. Teachers are highly reflective and school processes enable staff to know learners’ strengths and needs well.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

To achieve and sustain equitable outcomes for all students, furthering understanding and use of deliberate, effective internal evaluation in relation to curriculum developments is necessary. This should help leaders, teachers and trustees to know how effective curriculum innovations and changes to teaching practice are, in achieving the enactment of the school’s vision, goals and targets. Evaluative judgements should highlight success to date, define limitations and inform planning for consistent sustainable practice.

Although activities and events provide children with opportunity to participate and celebrate Māori culture and te reo, meaningful inclusion of te ao Māori across the curriculum continues as an area of ongoing development.

Charter achievement targets should be revised and progress tracked against these to: further strengthen practice for those students identified as requiring acceleration; and to plan positive achievement trajectories for their success.

The school continues to work on strategies to embed consistent teacher practice. Refining teacher inquiry to link specifically with appraisal is a next step. Enhancing moderation processes to ensure consistent and dependable teacher judgements in relation to the National Standards, especially for children after 40 weeks and 80 weeks of schooling should continue.

The school’s appraisal process meets the requirements for issuing and renewing Teacher Practising Certificates.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. At the time of this review there were no international students attending the school.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • revise charter achievement targets and tracking of progress to further strengthen the school’s response to all students requiring accelerated progress

  • refine teacher inquiry to link specifically with appraisal
  • enhance moderation processes to ensure consistent and dependable teacher judgements in relation to the National Standards.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

3 November 2017

About the school

Location

Crofton Downs, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2823

School type

Contributing (Year 1 - 6)

School roll

257

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori 8%
Pākehā 72%
Asian 16%
Pacific 4%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

3 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014
Education Review June 2011
Education Review June 2008

Findings

Most students achieve well in a positive and inclusive environment. Parents and the community are well included in the school. The principal and senior leaders are purposefully developing shared curriculum expectations, and strengthening culturally responsive practices for Māori and Pacific learners. Teaching practice is strengthening in response to these expectations.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Crofton Downs Primary School in Wellington caters for students in Years 1 to 6. The school has experienced roll growth since the June 2011 ERO report. Currently there are 164 students enrolled, with 9% identifying as Māori and a small number of Pacific students. Parents and students experience a welcoming environment.

The new principal, appointed at the beginning of 2013, has suitably included teachers and trustees in developing the charter. This focuses on strengthening the relationship between the school's planned goals for development and expectations for effective teaching and learning.

The school has purposefully responded to the areas for development identified in the previous ERO report.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Assessment information is purposefully used to promote student achievement.

Reported achievement information shows most students achieved in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics at the end of 2013. Data is analysed to show the achievement of year, ethnic and gender groups. Reported data shows that accelerating the achievement of Māori and Pacific learners is a priority, especially in writing and mathematics.

Students involved in learning support programmes are well tracked to monitor their progress. The school has identified a number of actions as part of its annual targets to raise achievement of students identified as priority learners. To strengthen review of these actions, school leaders should identify all students achieving below National Standards in the target groups outlined in the school's charter.

School leaders encourage collaborative analysis of data between staff. Teachers meet regularly to discuss student outcomes from assessment. They consider the progress of individuals and decide about how best to match learning needs to strategies in the classroom. Increased reporting of achievement information to trustees supports the board's decision making about resourcing to address the needs of students.

Parents are well informed about students' progress and achievement. Interviews and written reports during the year promote parent involvement in their child’s learning.

Students with special learning needs, including individuals requiring extension, receive appropriate support. Specialist programmes impact positively on student achievement.

Students' individual needs are fully considered and the curriculum is modified to include parent aspirations and the developing skills of individuals. Reciprocal partnership between parents, school staff and external agencies supports learning opportunities and considers strategies to support students' wellbeing and development.

Students with complex needs are valued as an integral part of the school and included in a caring and supportive environment.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

School leaders and teachers continue to develop guidelines and expectations to fully promote the implementation and review of the Crofton Downs Primary School curriculum.

Students participate in learning opportunities to motivate and promote their learning. Involvement in electives, the arts, sporting and activities support students' interests and motivates their learning.

The shared vision for student success and values clearly underpin teaching and learning. Teachers have developed useful guidelines in the priority learning areas of literacy and mathematics. These promote a shared understanding for agreed curriculum delivery practice in the classroom.

The outcome of student inquiry learning is evident in the classroom. Authentic contexts for learning motivate the development of relevant skills, values and competencies for students. Learning experiences acknowledge the cultural backgrounds of students at the school, including Pacific learners.

Transition in and out of the school is responsive to student and parent needs. Pre-visits to school by children before five years of age are flexible to meet the needs of families and individuals. A welldeveloped relationship with local early childhood services provides a useful connection between educational services.

The principal has facilitated meaningful review and articulation of the school’s curriculum intent and expectations. Resulting changes are providing a useful foundation to inform a shared understanding of curriculum priorities. EROs evaluation affirms that change is well informed and that ongoing development is well considered as part of the school's strategic direction.

School leaders have a clear understanding of the effectiveness of current teacher practice and aspects for further development. Teachers continue to develop a shared understanding and use of strategies aligned to the school's expectations for effective practice. School leaders provide useful guidance through involvement in professional learning and development (PLD), appraisal feedback and opportunities to share practice.

The newly introduced model for teacher appraisal is usefully linked to teachers' inquiry into their practice. Teachers reflect on, and are beginning to gather evidence to show, how strategies used in the classroom improve student outcomes.

School leaders identify that continued development of teacher inquiry and appraisal is required. ERO agrees that further development of these processes should enable teachers to formally consider the impact of their practice on the progress, achievement and engagement of students.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students experience positive relationships with peers and teachers. They contribute purposefully to all aspects of school life.

Teachers report increased inclusion of relevant contexts to acknowledge Māori students' culture since the previous ERO review.

It is timely to continue to further develop culturally responsive practices and experiences across the school’s curriculum. The school should also explore and implement actions to build teacher's understanding and capability in this area.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to increase its understanding about the performance of the curriculum and to promote sustainable practice.

Collective development of the school's strategic and annual planning goals is strengthening the shared direction of the school. Goals align with strategies to guide development and strengthen priority areas.

To further develop review of the school's annual goals, school leaders and trustees should strengthen the related success indicators so that they are better able to determine how well outcomes are achieved.

Trustees liaise with the school community through surveys and have presented the strategic plan. Relevant training is accessed to support the board's governance of the school. Trustees are reviewing policies and procedures to improve the connection between these guiding documents and current school practice.

Leaders are effectively guiding improvement and promoting positive change. The new principal and senior leaders are usefully developing shared curriculum expectations and introducing review processes to support sustainable practice.

Collaboration by staff and clearer expectations for teaching practice are contributing to improved curriculum outcomes for students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusions

Most students achieve well in a positive and inclusive environment. Parents and the community are well included in the school. The principal and senior leaders are purposefully developing shared curriculum expectations, and strengthening culturally responsive practices for Māori and Pacific learners. Teaching practice is strengthening in response to these expectations.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

23 June 2014

About the School

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2823

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

165

Gender composition

Male 52%

Female 48%

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Indian

Other ethnic groups

74%

9%

3%

7%

7%

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

23 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

June 2011

June 2008

November 2005