Te Pahu Preschool Group

Education institution number:
34046
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
37
Telephone:
Address:

731 Te Pahu Road, Te Pahu

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ERO’s Akanuku | Assurance Review reports provide information about whether a service meets and maintains regulatory standards. Further information about Akanuku | Assurance Reviews is included at the end of this report.

ERO’s Judgement

Regulatory standards

ERO’s judgement

Curriculum

Meeting

Premises and facilities

Meeting

Health and safety

Meeting

Governance, management and administration

Meeting

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed non-compliances and is now taking reasonable steps to meet regulatory standards.

Background

Te Pahu Preschool Group is a non-profit, incorporated society. The service is governed by an elected volunteer executive committee. The preschool provides all-day education and care for children from three to six years of age. A head teacher and office manager are responsible for the management operation and leadership.

Summary of Review Findings

The centre philosophy reflects the service’s beliefs and values. The curriculum is inclusive, and responsive to children as confident and competent learners. Parents’ aspirations and children’s interests inform individualised learning plans. Children and their families are supported to be confident in their own culture. Children are encouraged to develop an understanding, and respect for the unique place of Māori as tangata whenua.

The design and layout of the indoor and outdoor environments support the provision of different types of learning and experiences. Management processes are in place to guide daily centre operation.

Actions for Compliance

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed the following non-compliances:

  • heavy furniture, fixtures and equipment that could topple and fall needing to be secured or removed (HS6)
  • a safety device attached to the kitchen door ensuring that children don’t have access to the kitchen without adult assistance or supervision (PF17)
  • consistent evidence of parental acknowledgement that medicine has been given to children (HS28).

Next ERO Review

The next ERO review is likely to be an Akarangi | Quality Evaluation.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

11 February 2021

Information About the Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Te Pahu Preschool Group

Profile Number

34046

Location

Te Pahu, Waikato

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

33 children

Percentage of qualified teachers

80%+

Service roll

35

Gender composition

Female 18, Male 17.

Ethnic composition

Māori 4
NZ European/Pākehā 29
Other ethnic groups 2

Review team on site

November, 2020

Date of this report

11 February 2021

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, December 2016

Education Review, August 2013

General Information about Assurance Reviews

All services are licensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The legal requirements for early childhood services also include the Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008.

Services must meet the standards in the regulations and the requirements of the licensing criteria to gain and maintain a licence to operate.

ERO undertakes an Akanuku | Assurance Review process in any centre-based service:

  • having its first ERO review – including if it is part of a governing organisation
  • previously identified as ‘not well placed’ or ‘requiring further development’
  • that has moved from a provisional to a full licence
  • that have been re-licenced due to a change of ownership
  • where an Akanuku | Assurance Review process is determined to be appropriate.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. Before the review, the staff and management of a service completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO assesses whether the regulated standards are being met. In particular, ERO looks at a service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher certification; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO also gathers and records evidence through:

  • discussions with those involved in the service
  • consideration of relevant documentation, including the implementation of health and safety systems
  • observations of the environment/premises, curriculum implementation and teaching practice.

1 Evaluation of Te Pahu Preschool Group

How well placed is Te Pahu Preschool Group to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Te Pahu Preschool Group is a non-profit, incorporated society, governed by an elected, volunteer executive committee. It is located west of Hamilton in the rural district of Te Pahu. The centre is licensed for 33 children over the age of two years. At the time of this ERO review there were 40 children on the roll. The centre provides full-day sessions from Monday to Friday for children up to school age. Younger children attend until 1pm. The centre aims to provide a quality learning and care environment that motivates children to explore, build their confidence and follow their interests alongside qualified, registered teachers. The programme is underpinned by Te Whāriki, and the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. A feature of the programme is the regular use of the local forest environment for children's learning.

Since the 2013 ERO report the centre has made good progress with the areas for development related to management and leadership structures, self review, appraisal, assessment and planning and te reo and tikanga Māori practices. Improvements include:

  • a review and update of the constitution leading to clear roles and responsibilities for human resource management and related policies

  • recently upgraded indoor and outdoor areas to enhance the facility for teachers, children and their families

  • improved systems and processes for self review

  • strengthened assessment and planning processes

  • teachers increased use of te reo and tikanga Māori practices during the sessions.

As a result of changes in centre leadership, the executive committee have created a new position of centre manager to oversee professional leadership and day-to-day management of centre operations. The newly appointed centre manager is due to take up her role in November. An administrator contributes to the smooth running of the centre. Two new teachers have joined the teaching team since the 2013 ERO report. The service is committed to employing qualified and registered teachers. 

The Review Findings

Te Pahu Preschool is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children and their families.

The centre enjoys strong support from the local community and reciprocal relationships with Te Pahu School. Families have worked cooperatively with a dedicated and well-qualified teaching team to establish and sustain a welcoming and caring environment for children. Strong and positive partnerships are evident where parents settle children to play, take time to read children's portfolios, centre displays, and engage in meaningful conversations with teachers about their children. This is contributing to a sense of wellbeing and belonging for families, children and teachers.

Children are confident to explore and experiment with a wide variety of interesting, readily accessible and good quality equipment and materials. Children explore early concepts of literacy and mathematics, and creatively use an interesting variety of tools for writing and for exploring mathematics concepts. They make choices and follow their interests in groups or as individuals. ERO observed children engaging in dramatic and imaginative play with their friends. They express themselves through opportunities to share their ideas and questions with their peers and interested teachers who know them well.

A feature of the centre programme is the weekly opportunities older children have to explore with teachers and parents in the nearby Kaniwhaniwha Bush reserve, and Pirongia Mountain area. This is contributing to their growing understanding of natural science and sustainability. The curriculum includes regular trips and excursions into the wider community and to places of local interest and visits from interested members of the community to share their skills such as beekeeping.

Celebrations of birthdays and significant special occasions provide focal points throughout the year. Flexible routines enable children to engage for long periods of time in activities of their choosing. There are age-appropriate, planned teacher-led experiences that are contributing to children's developing social skills. Teachers should consider reviewing the induction programme for families new to the centre. This process should include sharing knowledge about the culture of the service to help build parents' sense of belonging and ensure the ongoing sustainability of the service.

A strength of the service is the well-planned transition to school that includes reciprocal visits, detailed reports shared with new entrant teachers about children's strengths, interests and readiness for school, and inclusion in school celebrations and events.

Teachers have participated in professional development and an in-depth review of integrating bicultural perspectives into the curriculum. This has resulted in children's increasing confidence in the use of te reo Māori, respect for tikanga practices, and a growing appreciation and understanding of celebrations such as Matariki. There has been a recent focus on increasing resources that reflect Maori cultural values. Teachers and children have been welcomed onto Purekireki Marae, where kaumātua shared aspects of the history, stories and places of local significance. Children are learning about bicultural values, and Maori children are able to experience success as Maori.

The teaching team have established collegial and professional relationships. They are reflective practitioners with a shared philosophy that is focused on positive outcomes for children, and developing meaningful partnerships with families. They meet regularly to plan and assess children's learning, and document this in detailed reports and profile books for children and families to share the learning. They engage in professional conversations, willingly participate in regular and relevant professional development, and undertake effective self review. There is a culture of shared leadership amongst the staff. Models of good teaching practice observed by ERO were:

  • strategies that promote children's confidence to explore, experiment and make mistakes as important learning experiences

  • skilful settling of children as they arrive

  • identifying children's special needs and working positively with specialist agencies to support equitable and inclusive outcomes for children

  • noticing and following children's interests to foster their love of learning

  • enthusiastic, ongoing participation in relevant professional learning and development.

Centre leadership has undergone some changes and challenges in recent times. The acting supervisor has ensured continuity for children and families through her experienced and dedicated leadership. She regularly provides informative reports on many important aspects of centre organisation. She models best practice in early childhood for the teaching team and is providing effective mentoring and support for a teacher undergoing teacher registration. The centre administrator provides effective and efficient leadership and valued support for teachers and the management committee.

The executive committee are effectively governing the centre through:

  • a clear, shared and regularly reviewed philosophy and vision

  • a recently reviewed and updated constitution resulting in clear roles and responsibilities for members and staff

  • appropriate policies, guidelines and procedures

  • detailed and well-aligned strategic and annual plans that focus on meeting the intent of the centre philosophy

  • effective self review that leads to ongoing development and improvement of the centre.

The executive committee access appropriate external advice to support them to keep up to date with regulatory requirements and participate in training for their roles. Through effective governance they have placed the centre in a good position to sustain the service in the community.

Key Next Steps

ERO and centre leaders agree that useful next steps for centre development are to:

  • continue to review and strengthen human resource management systems and processes to ensure they align with current New Zealand Education Council expectations and other legislative requirements

  • increase the opportunities for older children and active learners to add complexity to their learning and take further leadership roles in the centre

  • consistently implement strategies to positively guide and engage children in the learning process.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Te Pahu Preschool Group completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Te Pahu Preschool Group will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

16 December 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

West of Hamilton

Ministry of Education profile number

34046

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

33 children, aged over 2

Service roll

40

Gender composition

Boys 23 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Other Asian

39

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2016

Date of this report

16 December 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

August 2013

Education Review

April 2010

Education Review

June 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.