Myross Bush School

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Education institution number:
3991
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
144
Telephone:
Address:

288 Mill Road North, Myross Bush

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Summary

This Year 1-6 school has 180 children. A small number of children identify as Māori, Pacific, or are from other ethnic backgrounds.

A new principal was appointed in Term 4, 2015. There have also been several changes in the senior leadership team.

Since the last review the school has:

  • introduced a more student-led model for learning, known in the school as the ‘Active Learner’

  • modified some classrooms to create a modern-learning environment to enable children to have greater choice in how and where they learn

  • developed more useful learning progressions for literacy, mathematics and the key competencies.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school effectively responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The school has a number of comprehensive processes that support children in achieving equitable and excellent outcomes. The quality and subsequent reliability of internal evaluation needs to be improved.

Particular strengths of the school that support equity and excellence include the ways in which:

  • children are actively supported by teachers to take responsibility for their own progress and achievement

  • the school has implemented research-informed and innovative approaches to teaching and learning

  • it is well led and governed.

Over time children continue to achieve at high levels in reading, writing and mathematics against the National Standards. There are no significant disparities in achievement between different groups in the school.

Several school practices need further development to improve the quality of school data and information gathering.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school effectively responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Across the school, there are high levels of achievement against the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. There are no significant disparities in achievement for different groups of children. The next step is for the school to improve its moderation practices in order for school leaders and the board to be confident about the reliability of teachers’ assessment judgements.

The school aspires for its children to be ‘active learners’ and has adapted teaching practices and the school environment to achieve this. As a result, most children could talk about how well they are achieving and their next learning steps.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Most processes and practices are effective in achieving equity and excellence for all children.

All children benefit from a more culturally responsive curriculum. Māori children have gained a greater sense of identity and belonging through learning more about their language and culture. Regular consultation with parents of Māori and Pacific children supports this.

There is a deliberate focus on lifting the achievement of any child who is below the National Standards. Teachers work intensively with small groups of children to address gaps in their learning. They inform, regularly update and involve parents and teacher aides in this support.

The school is well led and governed. Leadership is reflective and improvement focused. Change has been managed in a consultative and responsive manner.

The school’s priorities for development are well considered, planned and kept to the fore. School initiatives, actions and practices align well with school priorities and plans for raising achievement. Teachers are well supported to grow professionally. They value their collaborative work culture.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

Some school processes need further development in order to improve the quality of school data and information gathering.

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The principal has identified, and ERO agrees, that the school needs to strengthen:

  • assessment and moderation practices so that school leaders and the board are fully assured about the reliability of teachers’ judgements
  • the frequency of monitoring and reporting on the progress of target students
  • the quality and frequency of internal evaluation of different curriculum areas and other aspects of teaching and learning.

Steps are underway to address the first two areas but these will require further work.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • strengthen assessment and moderation practices
  • tighten the monitoring and reporting of target children’s progress
  • implement regular and ongoing, formal internal evaluation of the curriculum and other aspects of teaching and learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

14 August 2017

About the school 

Location

Invercargill

Ministry of Education profile number

3991

School type

Contributing

School roll

179

Gender composition

Girls: 49% Boys: 51%

Ethnic composition

Māori: 2%
Pākehā: 90%
Pacific: 2%
Other: 6%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2017

Date of this report

14 August 2017

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review: February 2013

Education Review: June 2009

Education Review: May 2006

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Myross Bush is a rural school, located on the outskirts of Invercargill. Since the last ERO review in 2009, there have been changes to the senior leadership team. The strengths and abilities of leaders and teachers are well used to help achieve the school’s goals. All aspects of school operations are strategically developed and monitored.

Students’ learning benefits from an experienced and collaborative staff. Students learn in secure and caring environments. The community, board and staff have high expectations for students learning. The school’s vision of “from strong foundations we grow and stand tall together” and its values are strongly reflected in the school’s curriculum and student outcomes.

Parents and the wider community are valued and seen as an integral part of the daily life of the school. Partnerships between home and school are developed and nurtured to maximise children’s learning.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. This judgement is evident through the following strengths.

The school has a range of valid, reliable and useful information about student learning in all areas of the curriculum.

Senior leaders and teachers effectively use achievement information:

  • with students to discuss and reflect on their progress and achievement, and to set appropriate goals
  • to identify trends to inform their teaching and to identify the students’ next learning steps
  • to identify, plan for and monitor the progress and achievement of students needing extra support with their learning
  • to monitor closely the learning and wellbeing of all students
  • to review the relevance and coherence of the school-wide learning progressions.

Trustees make appropriate decisions to allocate resources based on achievement and other relevant information to meet identified needs and priorities, and monitor the progress towards their strategic aims.

Area for review and development

Senior leaders need to use the high quality classroom information to collate, analyse, track and report rates of progress at school-wide level and for groups of students. This information would further assure senior leaders and trustees that students are making appropriate progress in relation to their needs and abilities.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is highly effective in promoting and supporting students’ learning. The principles of the New Zealand Curriculum are clearly evident in the design and implementation of the school’s curriculum. These judgements are based on the following strengths.

The school puts the students at the centre of teaching and learning.

The curriculum offers students a broad education that makes relevant links within and across the different learning areas.

All students are purposefully taught how to reflect on their own learning and learning processes.

The school’s community is well reflected in the school’s curriculum content.

Curriculum documents clearly set out the expectations for teaching and learning. These are regularly reviewed to ensure that they are still meeting the needs and abilities of students.

Students benefit from very good to high quality teaching across all learning areas.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Trustees, leaders and teachers show a strong commitment to creating a more bicultural school. School leaders have developed sound systems to support teacher development and the delivery of meaningful bicultural learning across the school. Māori students benefit from a learning environment that values and reflects their culture. They regularly hear and use te reo Māori throughout the school day. Learning information shows that Māori students enjoy success with their learning. Surveys indicate that Māori students are happy to be at school.

A next step is for the board and senior leaders to include bicultural development in their strategic planning to further support success for Māori students, as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

This judgement is based on the following strengths:

  • the high expectations that trustees, school leaders and teachers have for students’ engagement and learning, and for themselves as professionals
  • highly effective leadership and management that is distributed across the school
  • the very strategic approach that school leaders and trustees have to all school developments
  • a holistic approach to planning and school development that ensures all school practices lead to continued improvement and positive outcomes for students
  • the high level of knowledge that trustees have about their roles and responsibilities, and the school.

The school’s practices and classroom programmes are well aligned with the school’s vision, values, policies and procedures. This alignment is well supported by the school’s ongoing cycle of robust self review. Well developed review and planning practices help trustees, leaders and teachers effectively:

  • identify priorities for improvement
  • develop and implement plans
  • monitor progress
  • evaluate effectiveness.
Area for review and development

The school leaders and trustees need to review their planning processes to:

  • ensure that the strategic plan clearly reflects and focuses on the school’s key priorities
  • improve the clarity of the links between the strategic and annual plans.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services Southern Region

15 February 2013

About the School

Location

Invercargill

Ministry of Education profile number

3991

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

185

Gender composition

Boys: 52% Girls: 48%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other

91%

3%

6%

Review team on site

October 2012

Date of this report

15 February 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Accountability Review

June 2009

May 2006

March 2002