Appendix 2: Principles of pedagogical leadership in AE

The indicators below represent a broad structure of good practice in pedagogical leadership in Alternative Education. They are designed to be used alongside other ERO AE indicators as prepared for the reports Good Practice in Alternative Education (Appendix 3) and Secondary Schools and Alternative Education (Appendix 4).

ORGANISATIONAL PRINCIPLES

Managing school responsibility

  • The managing school actively ensures that pedagogical leadership contributes to improved social, academic and exit outcomes for students in AE
  • Managing school ensures that there are processes in place to review (and continuously improve) the effectiveness of pedagogical leadership
  • Managing school personnel actively and positively contribute to pedagogical leadership plans for the consortium and/or school-based AE programme
  • The managing school ensures that staff in pedagogical leadership roles are suitably appraised and have access to effective professional development and support

Partnership between schools and providers

  • Managing school personnel work with providers in the appointment of staff in pedagogical leadership roles
  • The goals or objectives for pedagogical leadership are developed in consultation with AE providers

The status of pedagogical leadership

  • Pedagogical leadership is valued across the cluster for its role in improving student outcomes in AE
  • Pedagogical leadership is supported with withdrawal time for tutors and cluster-wide professional development and support processes

IMPLEMENTATION PRINCIPLES

Pedagogical leadership staff with credibility and expertise

Background and experience

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles have teaching experience beyond the mainstream classroom. This could include, for example, special education, pastoral leadership positions, residential schooling, social or youth work or activity centres.

Building effective working relationships

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles have the social skills (emotional intelligence) to build positive working relationships with AE tutors and managers
  • Staff in pedagogical leadership actively listen to AE tutors, identifying their strengths and development areas
  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles work constructively with teachers and leaders from managing and enrolling schools
  • Pedagogical leadership is authoritative but not authoritarian or coercive in working with AE tutors and students

Educational theory and practice

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles have a good understanding of educational theory and practice, including an understanding of the teaching and learning issues faced in settings such as Alternative Education (see also ERO’s indicators of Good Practice in Alternative Education, especially Pedagogy for At-Risk students)
  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles help develop the numeracy and literacy skills of AE tutors while also supporting the development of innovative and relevant teaching and learning, including that linked to students’ study/career paths after AE

Māori pedagogy

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles appreciate the pedagogical issues associated with teaching the diverse Māori students in AE and can support tutors to respond to this in line with good practice (see also ERO’s indicators of Good Practice in Alternative Education, especially Pedagogy for At-Risk students)

Ethical, creative and strategic leadership focussed on improvement

Emphasis on student outcomes

  • Pedagogical leadership is focused on improving the social, academic and destination outcomes for students in AE
  • Pedagogical leadership models enthusiasm and optimism about making a difference for students

Creative, flexible and persistent leadership

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles understand that AE can differ from mainstream schooling and may require an eclectic, innovative and creative approach to improving student outcomes
  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles are able to flexibly respond to the variety of social, academic, logistical and professional development issues that can arise in AE
  • Persistence is used alongside creativity and flexibility in working through the complex educational, social and logistical issues facing AE tutors

Ethical values and action

  • Staff in pedagogical leadership roles model inclusive practices and emphasise the potential of all students to achieve and make positive transitions from AE
  • Pedagogical leadership recognises the importance of pastoral care in support of student academic, social and destination outcomes
  • Pedagogical leadership supports the development of an inclusive culture and approach in the provision of AE
  • Staff in pedagogical leadership positions are able to both build good relationships in the cluster while also challenging the status quo in terms of student achievement levels and accepted practices

The strategic use of data to inform change

  • Pedagogical leadership improves the analysis of achievement information and the quality of self review, which in turn helps identify strategies for the ongoing improvement of the social, academic and exit outcomes for students in AE
  • Pedagogical leadership is strategically concentrated on areas that will make the greatest contribution or difference to social, academic and exit outcomes for students in AE

Using effective PLD practice

Effective PLD methods and approaches

  • Pedagogical leadership processes are consistent with effective PLD practice, for example those in the Ministry of Education’s Teacher Professional Learning and Development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration (BES).[22] Pedagogical leadership development processes for AE tutors will therefore:be focused on student outcomes, with links between classroom activity and the improved social, academic and exit outcomes for students in AE
  • use assessment information about the performance of tutors and students to make a difference in the classroom
  • involve many different sorts of activities for tutors to learn and apply newly acquired knowledge
  • work with and challenge tutor assumptions about learning
  • allow tutors to work with others to explore and develop their new knowledge about teaching
  • draw on experts (including subject teaching experts) who can facilitate tutors to develop their own understandings of new ideas
  • have active provider management who can create a vision for professional learning as well as lead and organise staff learning
  • maintain momentum in improving AE delivery and outcomes

Aligned with PLD plans of providers

  • Pedagogical leadership and the specific PLD plans of providers complement one another in supporting the development of tutor expertise

Pedagogical leadership as part of an effective set of networks

Managing schools

  • Managing schools support pedagogical leadership with access to educational resources, including careers support and guidance, in line with their contractual responsibilities and the need to improve the social, academic and destination outcomes of students in AE

Enrolling schools

  • Enrolling schools are active participants in managing the transitions of students they place in AE - both into and out of AE

AE providers

  • AE providers are active partners in working to improve teaching and learning, the Professional Learning and Development culture, and the social, educational and destination outcomes of students

Pedagogical leaders

  • Pedagogical leaders build effective relationships with RTLBs, RT:Lits and Special Education Services etc in support of specific student learning needs
  • Pedagogical leaders have suitable professional mentoring and support relationships