Appendix 2: Criteria for judgements of effectiveness

Evaluation Question

Criteria for making the judgment “highly effective”

Evaluation Question One

How effectively is student achievement information sought and used at key transition points (Years 8-9, Years 10 -11)?

There are well developed and well understood systems established for exchanging/sharing information about students as they transition at key points. These systems apply within and beyond the school.

The systems for gathering information and responding to students’ learning needs are appropriately inclusive of multiple parties (students, teachers, school leaders, parents, whānau, external agencies, Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO).

Decisions about: (a) the placement of students (b) subjects students take (c) programmes to address student’s learning needs

appropriately address all student groups (ethnic, gender, students with educational learning needs, children with special abilities).

Leaders regularly review (a) the processes they use in gathering and analysing data, and (b) the appropriateness of the responses they make for transitioning students.

Evaluation Question Two (a)

How effective are the processes used in determining the achievement and progress students make in literacy and mathematics at Years 9 and 10?

Gathering achievement information

The tools teachers use are appropriate for gathering useful data about student achievement and progress in literacy and mathematics.

Multiple sources of data are collected and analysed to arrive at valid judgements about each student’s achievement and progress in literacy and mathematics.

Data is collected at multiple points in time so that there is longitudinal evidence of student achievement and progress.

Data is collected for all groups of students (ethnic, gender, students with special education needs and students with special abilities) in literacy and mathematics.

Analysing and interpreting achievement information

Data is disaggregated for each student group (ethnicity, gender, students with special education needs and students with special abilities) in literacy and mathematics.

Data is analysed for trends in the performance of groups of students in literacy and mathematics.

Evaluation Question

Criteria for making the judgment “highly effective”

Evaluation Question Two (a) continued

How effective are the processes used in determining the achievement and progress students make in literacy and mathematics at Years 9 and 10?

External standards and/or criteria are used as tools to aid in the interpretation of mathematics and literacy data.

Comparison is made to expected learning standards throughout the year.

Comparison is made to expected learning standards over successive years.

Multiple people know about the findings through such processes as collaborative data teams and professional learning communities. Inquiry is embedded in the culture of the school.

Evaluation Question Two (b)

How effective are the processes used in setting improvement goals and targets for these students?

Goals and targets for groups of students align appropriately with the findings about their achievement and progress.

Goals and targets appropriately address all identified student groups (ethnic, gender, students with educational learning needs, students with special abilities).

Multiple parties know about, and are involved in fostering the attainment of the goals and targets that are set for students in literacy and mathematics.

Teachers have a clear understanding of the implications of the goals and targets for programme planning and implementation. The goals and targets are in evidence in their programmes across the curriculum.

Leaders have a clear understanding of the implications of the goals and targets for curriculum management (planning, resourcing and policy development) in literacy and mathematics.

Evaluation Question Three

How effectively is assessment information used to plan and implement and review actions to improve student achievement in literacy and mathematics at Years 9 and 10?

TeachersTeachers, in all subject areas, use literacy and mathematics assessment data to plan for groups of students, and individual students. (Literacy across the curriculum (LAC) and mathematics across the curriculum (MAC))

Teachers in all subject areas cater for the diversity of achievement in their classes.

Evaluation Question

Criteria for making the judgment “highly effective”

Evaluation Question Three (continued)

How effectively is assessment information used to plan and implement and review actions to improve student achievement in literacy and mathematics at Years 9 and 10?

Teachers regularly review whether the literacy and mathematics programmes they provide in their classrooms are meeting students’ needs.

Students

Students know about their achievement and progress relative to expected levels/standards, and help to plan future learning that specifically addresses their learning strengths and next steps.

Leaders, teachers and trustees

Leaders provide time and guidance to teachers that support them to make appropriate provision for students in their classes.

The programmes/initiatives leaders and teachers make are sustainable over time. Programmes are appropriately resourced (through materials and personnel) and the rationale for these is clearly articulated and understood.

Leaders implement well-coordinated systems in which teaching is clearly linked to strategic planning and expectations for professional practice.

The responses/initiatives leaders and teachers make are supported by board of trustee resourcing and ongoing interest.

School leaders undertake robust review of initiatives (the review is focused on gathering evidence of outcomes for students).

The review process is inclusive of the perspectives of multiple parties (students, teachers, leaders, teacher aides, SENCO, parents/whānau and trustees) and the results are shared with them.

The review findings result in improvement to programme provisions for students in literacy and mathematics.