Appendix 3: A framework for self review

How effectively is our school’s mathematics curriculum designed, enacted and reviewed to respond to the strengths and needs of all students and accelerate their progress and raise achievement?

  • we have a clear rationale for the choices made in designing the mathematics curriculum and in selecting learning areas of emphasis
  • our learning programmes show adaptations to support students with diverse needs
  • teachers confidently use their knowledge of: learning area content; pedagogy; the deeper features of The New Zealand Curriculum; their students and their needs; and the school’s vision, values and learning priorities when selecting content and designing their teaching approach
  • teachers use evidence from: research; their colleagues; and their own past practice to reflect on and improve their teaching
  • teachers recognise students’ identities, languages, abilities and talents and ensure their learning needs are addressed
  • teachers undertake regular professional learning relating to pedagogy, their teaching areas, and pedagogical content knowledge
  • our school’s community is reflected in school documentation, curriculum content and resources
  • we use self-review processes to investigate the effectiveness of curriculum decision-making in improving student engagement and achievement
  • the opinions and views of students, parents and whānau are incorporated as part of ongoing review and development of the curriculum and learning programmes
  • board members are engaged in the design of the school’s curriculum.

To what extent is achievement information in relation to the mathematics standards used by our board of trustees to inform governance decisions?

  • the board receives comprehensive, clear, and accurate reports about achievement and uses this information to plan for improved student outcomes
  • trustees are highly interested in progress and achievement information to identify needs, trends and patterns, compare progress over time and to inform decisions for future planning
  • the board has an ongoing cycle of robust self review that identifies priorities for improvement, develops and implements plans, monitors progress, and evaluates effectiveness
  • our strategic plan identifies the most urgent learning needs for all learners who are at risk of not achieving
  • our targets are challenging and encompass year levels, learning areas, and key groups including priority learners
  • the actions in our annual plan are focused on priorities likely to lead to improved student outcomes, and outline what will be put in place, who will be responsible and manageable timelines
  • we ensure that there is clear alignment from the strategic plan, through the annual plan, to curriculum implementation
  • our board has clear expectations about the extent and timeliness of reports they should receive from school leaders about student progress and achievement
  • strategic and other planning is based on analysed student achievement data and other information
  • our self-review processes are well understood and embedded in a way that ensures their ongoing use.

To what extent is achievement information in relation to the mathematics standards used by our school leaders to inform curriculum decisions?

  • student achievement information provides clear evidence of how well students are achieving in relation to the National Standards
  • our analysis of achievement data identifies achievement patterns and trends for the school, for cohorts, and groups of learners
  • individuals or groups of students who need support or extension are identified
  • our analysis of student achievement data (including separated data for Māori and Pacific achievement and special needs and abilities) is used to improve teaching and to identify areas for teacher professional development
  • learning programmes have appropriate sequences and coherent progression over the class and year levels
  • achievement data is analysed to improve future learning programmes
  • we have a clear rationale for the choices we make in designing the curriculum and in selecting learning areas of emphasis
  • we compare achievement for year levels from year-to-year to identify trends and patterns
  • content taught in one part of the programme is well integrated with other parts of the programme
  • we use self-review processes to investigate the effectiveness of curriculum decision-making in improving student engagement and achievement.

To what extent is achievement information in relation to the mathematics standards used by our teachers to inform their teaching?

  • our student achievement information provides clear evidence of how well students are achieving in relation to National Standards
  • assessment data is used effectively to inform planning, identify individual students for support or extension and to set goals with students and their parents/whānau, support staff or specialist teachers
  • our learning programmes show adaptations to support students with diverse needs
  • we analyse achievement data to improve future learning programmes
  • teachers establish high expectations for learning
  • all teachers demonstrate the belief that all learners can achieve regardless of their ethnicity, social background, gender, ability or needs
  • teachers identify strengths and potential in all students to support their learning and development
  • teachers use their knowledge of their students to decide on the teaching content and approach that will motivate and challenge them
  • teachers develop clear learning goals based on knowledge of individual students
  • learning activities and content are relevant, authentic and interesting for all learners
  • students’ learning is carefully sequenced to build on their prior knowledge
  • deliberate acts of teaching are targeted to students’ learning needs
  • teachers provide timely, accurate and meaningful information to parents about their child’s progress and achievement.

To what extent is achievement information in relation to the mathematics standards understood and used by our students to inform their next steps in learning?

  • students can talk about their own learning and achievements and their next steps for learning
  • teachers provide sufficient and effective opportunities for all students to engage in purposeful learning
  • students understand and use processes, tools and strategies to learn new concepts and transferable skills
  • assessment processes are fair and inclusive enabling all students to demonstrate their learning
  • all students receive regular, specific and constructive teacher feedback that contributes to the next stage of learning
  • teachers assist students to understand more about their own learning
  • teachers encourage students to set high personal learning goals and take their share of the responsibility for achieving these
  • exemplars are effectively used to help students understand what high quality work looks like.