Appendix 1: Evaluation framework and indicators

Early childhood services can use this evaluation report to review their policies and practices to determine how well their curriculum supports children to develop their social and emotional competence, and understanding of appropriate behaviour. The following questions and indicators could be used to guide self review.

Overall evaluation question

  • How effectively does this service’s curriculum support children to develop their social and emotional competence and understanding of appropriate behaviour?
  • Relationships and interactions in the service are warm and promote respect between children, between children and educators, and amongst educators, children and parents and whānau.
  • Children are empowered to take increased responsibility for the wellbeing of themselves, others and the group.
  • Through the programme and interactions with others, children have opportunities to develop strategies, skills and dispositions that support them in their social interactions with others.
  • Children are developing social competencies such as the ability to take on other points of view and develop negotiation strategies.
  • Children know the limits and boundaries of acceptable behaviour.
  • Children are developing strategies to manage their own behaviour.
  • Children are learning appropriate ways of letting other children know that their behaviour is unacceptable or inappropriate.
  • Children are offered genuine choices.
  • Children are involved in developing the service rules, limits and boundaries.
  • The service curriculum provides opportunities for children to discuss and negotiate rights, fairness, and justice with adults.
  • Educators, through their interactions with children, emphasise what to do and why, rather than what not to do, in explanations and instructions.
  • There are enough resources to promote children’s choices for challenge, revisiting prior learning, wider community experiences, exploration, solitary and group play and their choices are respected.
  • Educators use learning conversations (a range of conversation skills) to encourage children to talk and think about relationships, decision making and the consequences of different responses to a given situation or problem.
  • Educators notice and positively respond to children’s developing social and emotional competence.
  • Educators are responsive to children’s communication and behaviour and capitalise on the teachable moment to promote social and emotional learning.
  • Educators actively listen to children, interpret and respond to non-verbal and verbal communication.
  • Educators acknowledge and respond sensitively to children’s feelings.
  • Educators and children have developed trusting relationships where children are confident to ask questions and seek support.
  • Educators understand that challenging behaviour is often a form of communication and should be responded to and managed in accordance with the individual needs of the child.
  • Educators model and promote pro-social behaviour in the context of their relationships with children and with other adults (parents and other educators).
  • Managers and educators organise and manage the learning environment so that challenging behaviour is minimised or less likely to occur.
  • Routines and rituals foster children’s independence and respect their preferences.
  • Educators use consistent and positive guidance strategies to manage children’s challenging behaviours in understanding and dignified ways.
  • Educators are sensitive and knowledgeable of cultural factors that are contextually relevant for children.
  • Educators are sensitive to different behaviours and know when to seek support.
  • Educators use children’s interests and strengths to integrate social competencies into learning.
  • Assessment, planning and evaluation practices reflect, and are inclusive of, social and emotional development.
  • Children experience consistency of expectations/strategies for promoting social and emotional competence from all educators in the service.
  • Educators discuss emotions with children in meaningful and supportive contexts.
  • Educators are attuned to children’s cues.
  • The environment is emotionally safe and trustworthy.
  • Educators liaise with parents, other professional agencies and establish IEP’s for children who require additional support with their communication skills and social interactions.
  • The service regularly reviews manager/educator practice associated with supporting children’s social and emotional competence.

Investigative questions

  • In what ways does this service work in partnership with parents and whānau to support children’s developing social and emotional competence?
  • What opportunities are there for educators to regularly communicate with parents and whānau about their child’s learning and development?
  • What opportunities are there for educators to communicate with parents and whānau about their children’s developing social and emotional competence?
  • How do the service’s policy/procedures acknowledge and include different cultural expectations and practices that parents and whānau might have regarding their children’s social and emotional competence?
  • What does the service do to share/consult on its behaviour management policy or positive guidance procedures and practices with parents and whānau?
  • How does the service support parents and whānau in their role in developing their child’s social and emotional competence?
  • How does the service provide opportunities for parents and whānau to give feedback about how the service is supporting children to become socially and emotionally competent?
  • How does the service manage complaints about strategies for developing children’s social and emotional competence?

Investigative questions

  • How does this service’s behaviour management policy or positive guidance procedure align to educator practice?
  • How does the service review its behaviour management policy or positive guidance process and associated practice to ensure alignment of policy/process and practice?
  • How does this service evaluate the effectiveness of the strategies educators use to support children’s social and emotional competence?
  • How does the service ensure there is a shared understanding of policy/procedures and what it means for educator practice? How are new staff/educators or relievers made familiar with the policy or document guidance process, and service expectations?
  • How well are the strategies used by educators aligned to the service’s documented behaviour management policy or positive guidance procedures?
  • How does the service ensure there are regular opportunities for educators to reflect on how practice is working for them and for children?

Investigative questions

  • How are managers and educators supported to manage children’s challenging behaviours?
  • In what ways do educators support each other in understanding and managing challenging behaviour?
  • Do educators share a common understanding of the strategies they will use when children’s behaviour is challenging or disruptive?
  • How do leaders in the service access support from relevant agencies when they are dealing with a child with challenging behaviour?
  • Is the available support timely and responsive?
  • Do educators use children’s challenging behaviour as a potential learning opportunity?
  • How does the service involve children and their parents and whānau in decisions regarding situations where behaviour is challenging or disruptive?
  • What professional development have managers and educators accessed to support them in understanding and managing challenging behaviour?