Appendix 1: Evaluation Rubric

A rubric was developed to define preparedness and was used to make an overall “best-fit” judgement about preparedness in each early learning service in the sample. The rubric was developed from the following information:

Te Whāriki notes:

The expectation is that each ECE service will use Te Whāriki as a basis for weaving with children, parents and whānau its own local curriculum of valued learning, taking into consideration also the aspirations and learning priorities of hapu, iwi and community.(p.8)

The expectation is that kaiako will work with colleagues, children, parents and whānau to unpack the strands, goals and learning outcomes, interpreting these and setting priorities for their particular ECE setting. (p.23)

Planning involves deliberate decision making about priorities for learning that have been identified by the kaiako, parents and whānau and community of the ECE service. (p.65)

The online webinars and guidance information  include some key messages about engaging with Te Whāriki. Key messages in the webinars include:

  • the role of leaders in ensuring there are systems and processes for:
    • developing and reviewing the setting’s philosophy of teaching and learning
    • considering kaiako interests, beliefs, skills, and knowledge in the provision of curriculum
    • collecting and considering parent and whānau aspirations and wider community goals and concerns – including those of local iwi and/or hāpu
  • Te Whāriki underpins your philosophy (not the other way around)
  • making children’s learning visible in relation to collective priorities.

Questions guide the process of establishing and reviewing curriculum and learning priorities. Some examples include:

  • How are the key ideas of Te Whāriki reflected in this setting’s curriculum?
  • What is the learning that is valued in this setting? How are we ensuring that all children have fair and equitable opportunities to achieve this?
  • How is this setting’s internal evaluation (self review) informing and responding to collective priorities?
  • How are the collective priorities evident in planning and implementation?

Professional learning and development plays a key role in supporting leaders and kaiako to implement Te Whāriki, particularly in relation to the areas the Ministry has identified as needing strengthening. Engagement in PLD helps build shared understanding and identify next steps for implementation, taking account of kaiako needs and the implications of Te Whāriki for the service’s policies, processes and practices.

Rubric: preparedness to implement Te Whāriki

Not prepared

Leaders and kaiako have not engaged in PLD to support them to implement Te Whāriki (2017).

Leaders and kaiako have not reviewed their service’s philosophy to align it to Te Whāriki (2017).

Leaders and kaiako, are yet to review and design their local curriculum to reflect the learning that is valued in their service (priorities for children’s learning).

Leaders and kaiako have not identified their next steps for implementation in relation to
Te Whāriki (2017).

Leaders and kaiako are not confident to implement Te Whāriki (2017).


Preparation underway

Leaders and kaiako are just beginning to engage in PLD to build their capability to implement
Te Whāriki (2017).

Through PLD leaders and kaiako are starting to build a shared understanding of Te Whāriki (2017) and are considering the implications for their practice.

Leaders and kaiako have begun to:

  • review their service’s philosophy to align it to Te Whāriki (2017)
  • review and design their local curriculum so that it reflects the learning that is valued in their service (priorities for children’s learning)
  • identify their next steps for implementation in relation to Te Whāriki (2017).

Leaders and kaiako are developing confidence to implement Te Whāriki (2017).


Well prepared

Leaders and kaiako are engaged in PLD to build their capability to implement Te Whāriki (2017).

Through PLD leaders and kaiako are building a shared understanding of Te Whāriki (2017) and they are clear about the implications of this updated curriculum for their practice.

Appraisal processes are supporting leaders and kaiako to implement Te Whāriki(2017).

Leaders and kaiako have:

  • reviewed their service’s philosophy to align it to Te Whāriki (2017)
  • reviewed and designed their local curriculum to reflect the learning that is valued in their service (priorities for children’s learning)
  • identified their next steps for implementation in relation to Te Whāriki (2017).

Leaders and kaiako are confident to implement Te Whāriki (2017).