Appendix 1: Statistics for sample of schools

This evaluation involved 439 schools in which ERO carried out an education review in Terms 1, 2 and 3, 2011. The types of schools, roll size, school locality (urban or rural) and decile ranges of the schools are shown in Tables 1 to 4 below.

Table 1: School types

School type

Number

Percentage of sample

Nationalpercentage[7]

Full Primary (Years 1‑8)

217

49

49

Contributing Primary (Years 1‑6)

166

38

34

Intermediate (Years 7‑8)

28

6

5

Secondary (Years 7‑15)

17

4

5

Composite (Years 1‑15)

11

3

7

Total

439

100

100

Table 1 shows that composite schools were under‑represented, and contributing primary schools were slightly over‑represented, in comparison to national figures. Intermediate and Years 7-15 secondary schools were representative of national figures. The differences were not statistically significant.[8]

Table 2: Roll size

Roll size[9]

Number

Percentage of sample

Nationalpercentage

Very small

24

5

11

Small

104

24

22

Medium

172

39

39

Large

99

23

19

Very large

40

9

9

Total

439

100

100

Table 2 shows that very small schools were under‑represented, and large schools slightly over-represented, in comparison to national figures. The differences were not statistically significant.

Table 3: School locality

Locality[10]

Number

Percentage of sample

National percentage

Main urban area

219

50

52

Secondary urban area

Minor urban area

Rural

27

71

122

6

16

28

6

11

31

Total

439

100

100

Table 3 shows that minor urban schools were over-represented, and rural schools slightly under-represented. The differences were not statistically significant.

Table 4: School decile ranges

Decile[11]

Number

Percentage of sample

National percentage

Low decile (1-3)

118

27

30

Middle decile (4-7)

182

41

38

High decile (8-10)

139

32

32

Total

439

100

100

Table 4 shows that low decile schools in the sample were slightly under‑represented, and middle decile schools slightly over‑represented, in comparison to national figures. The differences were not statistically significant.