Horotiu School - 28/06/2017

Summary

Horotiu School is located north of Hamilton and caters for children in Years 1 to 8. The current roll of 227 includes 100 Māori and eight Pacific children. The roll has remained stable in recent years.

Since the 2012 ERO review a new board chairperson and trustees have been elected. Trustees have accessed training about school stewardship. There has been a considerable roll increase during this time. A new principal started at the beginning of 2016 and a deputy principal started in June. The school’s learning environments, have been modified to support a more collaborative approach to learning and teaching. The school leadership team has prioritised professional learning and development in reading and mathematics.

The school’s involvement in the Ngāruawāhia Community of Learning (CoL)|Kāhui Ako is in the establishment phase. Teachers continue to work with the Performance Enhancement (PEN) North Waikato group, which provides opportunities for professional development and discussion with colleagues in other schools in order to improve teaching and assessment practices.

The school recognises that Māori boys are most at risk of not achieving at national expectations especially in writing. The school is working towards addressing this issue.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Horotiu School is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Conditions contributing to equity and excellence are partnerships with iwi and professional leadership for learning.

Further developments in assessment and teaching practice are needed to achieve equity and excellence.

The school has the capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori boys remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child. 

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Horotiu School is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

In 2016 most Māori children achieved at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori boys are over represented in the group of students whose learning is at risk. The school has recognised the need to accelerate the progress of Māori boys and all other children who are at risk of not achieving.

Nearly all Pacific children in the school are achieving at and above in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to National Standards.

The school’s achievement information indicates that in 2016 most other children achieved at or above the National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics. This information also shows that overall girls are achieving better than boys.

Other valued outcomes such as children being respectful, active learners, thinkers and communicators are promoted and well understood throughout the school.

Collaborative discussions about achievement within teaching teams assist teachers to make decisions about children’s progress and contribute to overall teacher judgements (OTJs) in relation to National Standards. Teachers use achievement information to plan for children’s needs and extend their learning. They have participated in external and internal professional learning in literacy and mathematics to build their capability.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Conditions contributing to equity and excellence are partnerships with iwi and professional leadership for learning.

The school has close ties to Turangawaewae and Kingitanga. The whakatauki gifted by Tainui kaumātua ‘Ki te kotahi te kaakaho whati, ki te kaapuia e kore e whati,’ ‘Strive together for success,’ underpins the school’s intent to develop a bicultural curriculum. A culturally rich curriculum fosters equity and excellence for children.

Manaakitanga, whanaungatanga, ako and mahi tahi contribute to a welcoming environment. Children, parents, whānau, teachers and members of the community have a sense of shared belonging and a strong focus children’s wellbeing and learning. There are many events and activities that celebrate children’s identity and sense of belonging.

Trustees are very supportive of the principal, staff and children. They guide the strategic direction of the school and have a commitment to ongoing training to improve their stewardship capabilities. They work alongside the principal and have a well-considered, collaborative approach to managing change.

The introduction of innovative learning environments in 2016 resulted in teachers working together to integrate and plan literacy and mathematics programmes. They share their reflections about the learning of at-risk children. Children are increasingly provided with many opportunities to manage their own learning.

A focus on developing a positive culture, which is responsive to community aspirations is well understood. Frequent and effective communication with parents and whānau is strengthening learning partnerships between home and school.

The performance management system, including teaching as inquiry, has been strengthened and focuses on improving teacher practice to accelerate the progress of identified groups of children.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Further developments in assessment and teaching practice are needed to achieve equity and excellence. The following aspects are not fully implemented:

  • Trustees should continue to strengthen targeted action to accelerate the progress of identified groups of at risk learners including Māori boys.

  • Assessment systems to enable a more consistent approach to making overall teacher judgements in relation to the National Standards.

  • Teachers need to increase their knowledge and understanding in the teaching of written language, for Māori boys and other children at risk of not achieving equitable outcomes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori boys remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Recommendation

ERO recommends that, as part of its strategic and annual planning framework, the school develops an action plan to address the next steps identified in this report.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

28 June 2017

About the school 

Location

Waikato

Ministry of Education profile number

1746

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

227

Gender composition

Boys 52% Girls 48%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 49%
Māori 44%
Cook Island Māori 2%
Samoan 1%
South East Asian 1%
Other 3%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

April 2017

Date of this report

28 June 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

August 2012 
September 2009 
September 2006