Hunterville Consolidated School - 04/02/2015

Findings

School culture is characterised by inclusive relationships and respect for individuals. Students are highly capable and confident. Educational success for Māori, as Māori is promoted. Senior staff and teachers are improvement-focused. The board of trustees is well informed. Trustees maintain traditions that are important to the community. Parents are active participants in their children’s learning. The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Hunterville Consolidated School is situated in the rural community of Hunterville. Many of the 160 students travel to school by bus. ‘Quality Behaviour, Quality Environment, Quality Learning’ is the philosophy that underpins the curriculum.

School culture is characterised by warm, inclusive relationships and respect for individuals. Students take an active role in managing their learning. Senior students are very capable and confident.

Staffing is stable. Most teachers are very experienced practitioners. All work collaboratively to achieve sound levels of student progress and achievement across the school.

An active Home and School group assists the board to resource a broad curriculum that fosters students' engagement and success. Parents and whānau work in partnership with teachers to ensure students have a wide range of opportunities in which to participate and excel. Trustees represent the values and aspirations of parents.

The school has a very positive ERO reporting history and has made significant gains since the 2010 review.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Assessment information is well used to plan programmes that impact positively on student progress and achievement. The school’s assessment information indicates that the majority of students achieve at or above in relation to the National Standard in literacy and mathematics. There is also evidence of steady gains across the year with many students making accelerated progress.

Guidelines for teachers to collect, collate and use data are clearly stated and efficient. Teachers work together to analyse results and to identify strategies that have the greatest impact on students’ progress. As a result, teaching to close gaps in students’ learning is deliberate. Senior leaders monitor progress at regular intervals. The focus is on individuals and groups of students who require additional help or different learning approaches.

Students make a positive start to schooling from aged five years. Teachers focus on success in the early years as a foundation for future learning. By Year 8, students capably self-assess their work and identify aspects to improve. Students understand the learning tasks and what success looks like.

Close working relationships between parents and teachers impact significantly on the achievement of students requiring additional assistance. Making a difference is a shared responsibility, assisted by supportive partnerships. Increased rates of progress are evident and sustained.

Trustees and parents receive regular reports about student progress and achievement. Information shared is clearly stated, including how parents may assist at home and the impact of board resourcing.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The curriculum is highly responsive to students’ experiences, interests and learning needs. Authentic, local contexts underpin a broad curriculum that begins with the rural locality and extends into the world beyond.

The school’s expectations for effective teaching are explicit and evident in the deliberate strategies observed in classrooms. Teachers refer to best educational practice and research as part of their professional learning. Students and teachers share an enthusiasm for learning. Quality is valued and teachers create an environment that is challenging and invites students to take risks. Students demonstrate belief in their ability to learn.

Skilled teacher aides work with students, parents and teachers in a highly inclusive way. Outcomes for students’ academic, social and emotional progress are considerable.

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are increasingly integrated as learning tools. Trustees and teachers are very clear about the direction for ICT and parents’ views about their children keeping fit and playing a wide range of sports. Use of ICT is well considered.

Science learning is a curriculum priority. A community and school partnership continues to grow. The focus on agriculture, horticulture and biology is relevant to students and their families.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school actively promotes educational success for Māori as Māori. Sixteen per cent of the roll identify as Māori and a number whakapapa to Ngāti Hāuiti iwi. Formal reports to iwi show that most students achieve at or above in relation to the National Standard and at levels comparable or exceeding those of the total roll. Reports also indicate that Māori students experience success across the breadth of the curriculum.

Teachers are progressing te reo and te āo Māori in classrooms. There has been notable growth since the 2010 ERO review. Whole staff professional learning and weekly, external leadership continues to build teacher and student confidence. The progressive review of the school’s curriculum includes the integration of new learning.

Partnership with Rata Marae is supporting the school’s commitment to a marae-based model for developing student and teacher capability. Parents are helping, through sharing knowledge, to add complexity to the curriculum.

As a result, students lead confidently, demonstrate pride in their achievements and have good knowledge of their language, culture and identity.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The board of trustees governs capably and is well informed. Decisions are considered and students’ wellbeing is given priority. Trustees maintain traditions that are important to the community and resource new and forward thinking initiatives.

The charter is an effective planning document that supports developing ‘Quality Life Capabilities’ considered essential for students’ holistic progress. A methodical, efficient approach to self review includes processes to respond to issues as they arise. Curriculum review is collaborative and purposeful. The school’s focus on improvement has resulted in high quality outcomes for students.

Teachers actively lead curriculum development in their areas of interest and expertise. They are highly thoughtful practitioners. Senior students are role models and ambassadors for their school. They assume a variety of leadership responsibilities across the curriculum and influence decisions that affect their learning. Year 8 students are well prepared for secondary education.

Senior leaders are drivers of improvement and informed change. They model good practice and are open and inclusive, while ensuring that expectations for student progress are met across the school.

Trustees enjoy respectful relationships with parents and whānau. There is a strong sense of community, collaboration and shared decision-making. Parents and community members have opportunities to lead in the curriculum and actively do so.

Students’ transition pathways to school and to secondary school are designed to maintain a confident and positive attitude to lifelong learning. The school has evidence to show that students continue to succeed beyond primary education.

Trustees, senior leaders and teachers should continue to use effective self review to sustain and improve the school’s curriculum.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

School culture is characterised by inclusive relationships and respect for individuals. Students are highly capable and confident. Educational success for Māori, as Māori is promoted. Senior staff and teachers are improvement-focused. The board of trustees is well informed. Trustees maintain traditions that are important to the community. Parents are active participants in their children’s learning. The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.index-html-m2a7690f7.gif

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

4 February 2015

About the School

Location

Hunterville

Ministry of Education profile number

2366

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

168

Gender composition

Male 55%

Female 45%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

Other ethnic groups

80%

16%

4%

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

4 February 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2010

June 2007

June 2004