Maraenui Bilingual School (Napier) - 15/08/2014

Findings

How effectively is this school’s curriculum promoting student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

Maraenui Bilingual School has two educational streams, rumaki and bilingual. Students are socially supported within a culture of well-embedded values and learn through language, culture and identity. However, low student achievement is an ongoing concern. The school must implement consistent, high quality teaching, leadership and governance practices to improve student progress and achievement.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Maraenui Bilingual School has a long history of educating students from the local community. Many students who have left the school, return to visit with their families.

There are two educational streams within the school: rumaki (Māori immersion); and bilingual. Both streams operate as one with Maraenui Marau-ā-Kura the document that guides school direction.

Since the May 2011 ERO review, the positive tone and strong sense of whanaungatanga remains highly evident. However, student underachievement remains a concern for all.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The majority of students continue to require critical support to achieve National Standards expectations in literacy and mathematics. Student achievement in writing is of significant concern. It is difficult to establish how students achieve in other essential learning areas. Assessment practices are still developing across the curriculum.

Achievement information is regularly gathered in literacy and aspects of mathematics. This information is collated by the senior leadership team to consider changes needed to improve learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Leaders are continually working to improve the accuracy of schoolwide data, trends and patterns. They make recommendations to teachers towards increasing rates of progress.

Teachers have access to achievement information to better know each student’s strengths and learning needs. Data is beginning to be used to identify individual students' next learning steps.

Over time, senior leaders have assisted teachers to strengthen their analysis of student achievement information. This is now better used to implement appropriate learning programmes.

Students with special education needs are identified. Internal and external support is put in place. Students' progress is monitored and documented. The special education needs coordinator (SENCO) and senior leadership team are yet to evaluate the effectiveness of resourcing and interventions in supporting these learners to achieve.

Staff, through professional development, continue to refine their overall teacher judgements about students' achievement in relation to National Standards and Ngā Whanaketanga. Further work is urgently needed to ensure National Standards judgements are reliable.

Families receive information about their children’s learning. Many participate in school activities in a wide range of ways, including sporting, breakfast club and cultural initiatives.

Key next steps

Develop and implement consistently high quality teaching practices to improve student achievement.

Improve assessment practices to make reliable and valid judgements about student progress and achievement.

Evaluate the effectiveness of resourcing and interventions that support students with special education needs.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Kaupapa Māori is central to the school curriculum, Maraenui Marau-ā-Kura. This is a blend of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). Its implementation is across bilingual and rumaki classes.

The next step is to further develop the curriculum document to provide a more useful framework for teaching and learning. This should better support teachers to plan programmes that offer balance and progression in learning. Guidelines should include the NZC key competencies and curriculum principles.

Students in most classes are engaged in learning. The school pou (values) are embedded. These result in positive relationships between adults and students, and amongst students. A caring, respectful tone pervades the school.

Teachers reflect on their practice. Some are more deeply inquiring into whether their teaching is effective in meeting the needs of students who are well below expected achievement levels. A more consistent approach is needed to develop high quality teaching practices across the school.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Students experience learning through language, culture and identity. This is especially evident in the rumaki classes where kaiako are proficient in te reo Māori. Students are confident speakers who talk about their learning.

From Year 5, students from rumaki classes experience high quality, specialist teaching to assist their transition from te reo Māori to English learning across the curriculum. The graduate profile for these students is that they are competent in te reo Māori and English by the end of Year 8. There is evidence to show this profile is a useful aspirational tool.

The next step is to review the level of te reo Māori in teaching and learning across the bilingual classes. This should align with the criteria for each level in the Māori Language Provision funding.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Maraenui Bilingual School is not well placed to sustain or improve its performance.

Senior leaders work as a collaborative team and complement each other. They continue to implement initiatives with the desired outcome of improved student achievement. However, evidence-based self-review practices are not sufficiently embedded for systematic review and evaluation of programmes and initiatives. The board of trustees should receive more regular student achievement reports with explanation to guide decision making.

For many students, progress and achievement are not sufficient for them to access learning at an appropriate level of the curriculum. Implementation of school expectations for teaching is inconsistent. High expectations and accountability are required by all teachers to urgently respond to this challenge. As the professional leader of the school, the principal must lead improvement.

All teachers are regularly observed with useful feedback and feed forward to improve their teaching. The next step is to link these observations to a robust appraisal system.

It is unclear how effectively the board fulfils its governance role. Trustees had minimal input into this ERO review. Many aspects of governance are led by the principal. Since the on-site phase of the review additional documentation has been received by ERO. This demonstrates an induction process for trustees with the Maraenui Bilingual School Policy Framework guiding the direction.

Key next step

Develop and embed evidence-based self review to improve professional leadership and governance practices focused on accelerating student achievement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

The board of trustees should ensure policies and procedures for appraisal of staff are implemented.

[s 77C State Sector Act 1988]

Recommendations to other agencies

ERO recommends that the Secretary for Education consider intervention under Part 7A of the Education Act 1989 in order to bring about the improvements identified in this report.

Conclusion

Maraenui Bilingual School has two educational streams, rumaki and bilingual. Students are socially supported within a culture of well-embedded values and learn through language, culture and identity. However, low student achievement is an ongoing concern. The school must implement consistent, high quality teaching, leadership and governance practices to improve student progress and achievement.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years.

Joyce Gebbie National Manager Review Services Central Region

15 August 2014

About the School

Location

Napier

Ministry of Education profile number

2604

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

189

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

99%

1%

Special Features

5 Māori Immersion/Rumaki classes 4 Bilingual classes

Review team on site

June 2014

Date of this report

15 August 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2011

February 2008

March 2005