Mokoia Intermediate - 02/02/2017

Findings

A wide range of educational opportunities are provided and experienced by children. Trustees and leadership are committed to raising the achievement of all children, and particularly Māori children. An active partnership with Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi has been established. Learning partnerships between school whānau and parents is encouraged.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Mokoia Intermediate, is situated on Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi whenua, in the eastern suburbs of Rotorua City. It provides education for students from Years 7 to 8. The school’s roll of 302 includes 138 Māori students, most of whom whakapapa to Te Arawa. Since the previous ERO review in 2013, there have been several changes in the teaching staff. A rumaki class continues to provide an education for children in te reo and tikanga Māori practices. Teachers are participating in professional learning and development in writing and mathematics. Ngāti Whakaue provides additional funding to support reading and mathematics.

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are 'Educational excellence for lifelong learning, respect, relishing learning, and reflection'. Te Pae tawhiti whaia kia mau Te pae tata whakamaua kia tina. Mokoia is a community which values respect, honesty and positive relationships for learning.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO and is a member of the Eastern Rotorua Community of Learning.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

A range of appropriate assessment tools is used by the school to make informed decisions about children’s learning, progress and achievement, in particular those students at risk of not achieving.

School leaders identify Māori students and others whose achievement and progress is below expectations. They have established achievement plans in reading, writing and mathematics that outline expectations and guidelines for teachers. A school-wide register tracks and monitors children at risk of not achieving. This deliberate approach to accelerating progress is leading to improved outcomes for students.

Teachers use assessment information well to identify learners at risk of not achieving. They plan programmes and monitor their progress. These targeted learners are central to teachers' inquiries. Teachers monitor the effectiveness of their teaching to accelerate the progress of these learners.

The recently reviewed school appraisal systems and processes closely align to Education Council requirements. Teachers are increasingly confident to provide specific learning opportunities for those children at risk of not achieving. It is important to leaders to ensure there is a clear alignment between teacher goals and the school’s strategic targets for at risk learners.

Student achievement information reported to the board, assists trustees to focus on decision making matters to improve student outcomes. Senior leaders and trustees are able to clearly identify the number of students who are at most risk of not achieving. They now need to develop specific targets for Māori boys to more closely and frequently monitor the progress and acceleration of their learning. Regular reporting and monitoring on the progress of target groups enables leaders and trustees to evaluate programmes and teacher effectiveness leading to improved outcomes for children.

The Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) implements effective systems to identify students requiring additional learning support. She works collaboratively with parents, teachers and external agencies to develop relevant programmes for children with high learning needs. The progress of these students is closely monitored.

The school’s 2016 achievement information shows that half of Māori and other children are achieving at and above the National Standards in reading and mathematics. In writing, all boys and in particular Māori boys, were most at risk of not achieving expectations. Māori girls are achieving marginally better than Māori boys. Recent achievement data shows that an increasing number of students made progress or accelerated progress in writing and mathematics. Ngā Whanaketanga information shows that half of the children in the rumaki class achieved the expected level in pānui, tuhituhi and kōrero and more than half achieved in pāngarau.

Professional development for teachers in moderation practice has been provided by external facilitators. Teachers meet within learning centres and school wide to discuss and share samples of children’s work when making Overall Teacher Judgements (OTJs). School leaders recognize that there is a need to strengthen aspects of the management and use of student achievement data. Continuing to build moderation practices within the school and with contributing schools should ensure greater consistency in the making of overall teacher judgements.

There are examples in the school where teachers have established strong learning partnerships with whānau and parents. These partnerships involve teachers discussing strategies with parents and whānau to use at home to assist their child’s learning success. Children’s learning and progress is reported to parents. A systematic approach to engaging whānau and parents encourages them to become active participants in their children’s learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is well documented and provides clear expectations and guidelines for teaching and learning. There is a strong and appropriate focus on literacy and mathematics.

There is an increasing integration of meaningful context that enable children to have authentic learning experiences. A range of opportunities in the arts, sports, cultural experiences and education outside the classroom allows children to engage and participate in activities of their choice. Mixed-ability classes provide rich opportunities for children to work together and share and learn from one another.

There are models of effective teaching practice across the school. These include:

  • identifying, planning and monitoring to accelerate the learning of targeted students
  • planning deliberate acts of teaching
  • workshops where tuakana and teina work collaboratively in their learning
  • the use of digital devices to enrich thinking and learning.

There are caring positive relationships among students and teachers. Students are increasingly able to talk about what they are learning and what they need to do next. They are being provided with opportunities to take increased responsibility for their learning.

Leaders have implemented a distributive leadership model that is focused on building teacher capability in literacy and mathematics. This is promoting a learning culture amongst staff which encourages all teachers to grow their professional learning and practice. Leaders recognise that aspects of school management and professional learning need to be reviewed and consideration given to:

  • clarifying the roles and responsibilities within the senior leadership team
  • further developing an open culture that encourages and values all teachers and leaders to share their ideas.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

A strong relationship and active partnership with the local hapū Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi has been established. This promotes the building of partnerships with parents and whānau. Trustees are representative of the community and a whānau member of Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi has been co-opted onto the board. Kaumātua are valued for their participation and contribution and provide guidance for decisions regarding Māori language, practices and local history

The school should now review and evaluate the integration of a te ao Māori context within the curriculum. Developing the confidence and capability of teachers to support the provision of te reo and tikanga Māori should also assist them to strengthen children’s learning experiences.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance:

  • Student achievement information informs internal evaluation.
  • School leaders are focused on building professional capability and collective capacity to improve and sustain quality learning opportunities for children, and raise achievement particularly for those at risk of not achieving.
  • Trustees provide effective stewardship for the ongoing development and progress of the school. They have a clear focus on student achievement, and work with senior leaders to ensure that all children have access to equitable learning opportunities.
  • A distributive leadership model supports the sharing of teachers’ expertise and skills, and assists them to work collaboratively, and to share quality teaching practices that promote positive outcomes for children.
  • There is a strong relationship with whānau and an active partnership with tangata whenua, Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi.

5 Priority Area for Development

Senior leaders and trustees are able to clearly identify the number of students who are at most risk of not achieving. They now need to develop specific targets for Māori boys to more closely and frequently monitor the progress and acceleration of their learning.

Provision for international students

The Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (the Code) was introduced on July 1st 2016. The school is aware of the need to update its policies and procedures to meet the new code requirements by December 1st 2016

At the time of the ERO review there were 2 international students attending the school.

The school is making good progress in aligning its policies and procedures to meet the requirements of the new (2016) Code of Practice.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

A wide range of educational opportunities are provided and experienced by children. Trustees and leadership are committed to raising the achievement of all children, and particularly Māori children. An active partnership with Ngāti Te Roro o te Rangi has been established. Learning partnerships between school whānau and parents is encouraged.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

2 February 2017

About the School 

Location

Rotorua

Ministry of Education profile number

1832

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

302

Number of international students

2

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other European

Other

Asian

Pacific

46%

44%

4%

3%

2%

1%

Special Features

Rumaki class

Review team on site

November 2016

Date of this report

2 February 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

January 2013

January 2010

November 2006